In 1979, Activision became the industry's first third-party developer.[23] It was founded by Atari programmers who left the company because Atari did not allow credits to appear on their games and did not pay employees a royalty based on sales. At the time, Atari was owned by Warner Communications, and the developers felt that they should receive the same recognition that musicians, directors, and actors got from Warner's other divisions. After Activision went into business, Atari quickly sued to block sales of Activision's products, but failed to secure a restraining order and ultimately settled the case in 1982.[24] This court case legitimized third-party development, encouraging companies such as Quaker Oats (with their US Games division) to rush to open video-game divisions, hoping to impress both stockholders and consumers.


For a few years now, the reason for fast rising home prices have been blamed on tight inventory. After seeing what has happened in Toronto, I’m starting to question these claims of tight inventory in almost all major housing markets (US and globally). In Toronto, within two weeks, they went from having very low inventory to having a 50% increase. Where did all of their extra inventory come from? Could the same happen to other major cities as well? It’s possible that there are low inventory in so many places due to aggressive investor speculation, which is then causing locals to panic buy. Very similar to the irrational exuberance happening before the housing crash 10 years ago. Something can trigger these property investors to sell all at the same time, and cause buyers to pull back, similar to what’s happening in Toronto. Another housing crash is possible, and it doesn’t have to be caused by bad loans like last time.
Did you ever stop to think about how goods and services can’t teleport? We don’t have teleportation technology – or magic, for that matter. So when a president/congress decides to move the economy, it takes *time* for the economy to react. Policies take time to come in force, markets take time to guage impacts and respond accordingly, equilibrium is established only after a long series of interractions. It takes *years* not days or weeks. You don’t judge a president (or congress) by what happens immediately after they take office (read: the economic meltdown during Obama’s first term, or the economic uptick during Trump’s first few months). You look at what happens two years into their term of office, with acknowledgement of the context.
However, what I like about the first strategy is that the dollar amounts are limited up front (and we don’t have to make any assumptions about future implied volatility). The worst case scenario is you spend 0.5% of your portfolio every month buying worthless put options. The only way they would all be worthless is if the stock market went almost straight up for the entire year. And in that case, the equity portfolio should do far better than the losses spent on this sort of insurance against a crash.
Stock prices began to decline in September and early October 1929, and on October 18 the fall began. Panic set in, and on October 24, Black Thursday, a record 12,894,650 shares were traded. Investment companies and leading bankers attempted to stabilize the market by buying up great blocks of stock, producing a moderate rally on Friday. On Monday, however, the storm broke anew, and the market went into free fall. Black Monday was followed by Black Tuesday (October 29), in which stock prices collapsed completely and 16,410,030 shares were traded on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors, and stock tickers ran hours behind because the machinery could not handle the tremendous volume of trading.
But you should also crunch a few numbers and then do a little soul searching. Estimate how Vanguard's suggested mix would have performed during the late 2007-through-early 2009 slump, when stock prices declined nearly 60% in value and investment-grade bonds gained about 7%. If you think you would cave and begin selling in the face of such a loss, you might want to dial back your target stock position a bit.
The next step that was taken was striving to make reforms in accounts. That implied that the companies now needed to make clearer balance sheets that disclosed more information on the transactions and investments of the company. The companies were asked to make a proper disclosure of all details such as stock options and investments that were made offshore by the companies. This was done to give the investors a better understanding of a company before they actually did invest in a particular company. Since this was not mandatory earlier, the investors couldn’t judge a company properly and invest in nonprofitable ventures which led to losses. Since the conflict of interest of the research firms led to losses, the new rule that was laid was that the investment bankers and the research analysts had to work separately. This was needed to be followed very strictly as there were high penalties charged in case of breach of regulations.

The rising dollar has already caused "an emerging market slowdown aggravated by U.S. tariffs, which already contributed to a bear market in China and Turkish lira crash. Dollar upside risk remains as the U.S. Federal Reserve intends to hike despite risks abroad, including a contentious Brazilian Presidential election, Italian budget, Brexit planning," he added.
I am not an expert on what a president should do and most can be picked apart pretty readily by experts. But it would seem that the current trajectory of the Republicans under Trump is not one of reducing our deficit. Yes they want to scale back a great deal of spending. The problem is they want to dump a lot of that savings back into a bloated military budget and on top of that are considering drastic tax cuts. No analysis thus far has been at all optimistic about any potential increase in growth outrunning the addition this will make to our debt over the long term. So if that number is a concern neither party has shown a willingness to fix it.
At the time of the Flash Crash, in May 2010, high-frequency traders were taking advantage of unintended consequences of the consolidation of the U.S. financial regulations into Regulation NMS,[3][13] designed to modernize and strengthen the United States National Market System for equity securities.[14]:641 The Reg NMS, promulgated and described by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, was intended to assure that investors received the best price executions for their orders by encouraging competition in the marketplace, created attractive new opportunities for high-frequency-traders. Activities such as spoofing, layering and front-running were banned by 2015.[citation needed] This rule was designed to give investors the best possible price when dealing in stocks, even if that price was not on the exchange that received the order.[15]:171
Enjoyed reading the article. What do you think about the Atlanta market? Since the last crash, the housing market has skyrocketed with new folks/millennials moving into the area. I can’t imagine how people are able to continue to afford these rising prices. The pay out is not matching this rising cost of living. Any words or advice for the Atlanta market?
"If I'm going to rank the risks this fall, trade wars are one. Iran oil sanctions are two, then the European crisis is three. You have the Italian budget, due at the end of September, which is a very contentious thing, where the government promised a budget the European Commission is very likely to reject," said Harris. "I think you've already seen a foretaste with the Italian bond yields spiking up and staying higher."

It is not just the uber rish who lose the most. It is the middle class workers. Those of us who have worked hard and survied years of down sizing in larger corporations who will lose a great deal…along with all those who also benifit from our generosity over the years. All the school supply drives, blood drives, holliday food drives to name a few. We try to contribute the amount to our 401’s to earn the companies matching benifits. We are pentalized for taking out our money until we reach the age of 59. Those of us who are to close to retiring don’t have the opportunity to recoup our money. So we will be faced with working to a much older age then we planned. So in reality…while we may be middle income…we don’t have the ability to just put out our money. If we lose a great portion of our 401’s and there is another housing market crash they have managed to chip away yet another chuck of middle imcome households. Sooner or later it will only be the very poor and the very rich! We need a solution to bring back the middle income and a solution for more and more folks to have the opportunity to move beyond lower income! We have done our best to prepare for what life might throw at us short term and long time, but I do believe it is going to be a bummpy ride, so buckle up my prepper friends.
My guess is we’ll see a continued decline overall this fall with the luxury market seeing a bigger drop. The liberal’s vacant home tax would be pathetic, just a psychological tactic to scare away Asian buyers. The overall Canadian market isn’t strong which indicates the economy isn’t great. The Toronto market has a lot of downward momentum that could continue right through to spring. Vancouver has bounced back from government meddling so maybe by spring Toronto can do it too. Can Toronto continue to be isolated from the Canadian economy? The NAFTA deal is what could send the Toronto Housing Market and the economy crashing. Overall, homeowners would be wise to sell because prices are high and availability limited. Why wait for lower prices in 6 months?
The Indian rupee strengthened further against US dollar in the early afternoon deals on Friday following the sustained weakness in the crude oil prices. The domestic currency (rupee) extended morning gains on Friday and hit a fresh 2-week high at 71.7663, up 62 paise per unit US dollar, the Bloomberg data showed. The rupee is trading 120 paise higher from the all-time low of 72.97 apiece US dollar. Earlier on Tuesday this week, the rupee went very close to hitting 73/$ and made a record low at 72.9675 against US dollar. 
The S&P BSE Sensex surged 368 points on Friday, the recovery after 970-point fall in this week earlier, to a day's high of 37,489.24 tracking the strongness in Indian rupee value against US dollar, lower crude oil prices, government's directive to oil marketers to book future prices of crude oil and positive Asian cues. Shares of ICICI Bank, Reliance Industries, HDFC Bank, ITC, Axis Bank, HDFC and SBI were the biggest positive point contributors to the benchmark index, as these stocks collectively added about 350 points. 

Some academics view the Wall Street Crash of 1929 as part of a historical process that was a part of the new theories of boom and bust. According to economists such as Joseph Schumpeter, Nikolai Kondratiev and Charles E. Mitchell, the crash was merely a historical event in the continuing process known as economic cycles. The impact of the crash was merely to increase the speed at which the cycle proceeded to its next level.
When asked if today’s stock market carnage could be a contagion effect of IL&FS default, Deven Choksey, Managing Director of KRChoksey Shares & Securities Private Ltd told CNBC TV18,”It is an asset-liability mismatch. The fear you have a money recovery taking place; the government of India is required to pay off the money pertaining to the projects, and particularly i think the road projects, where I think a question of Rs 10,000 crore of collection is required to be taken care of. According to me it’s a temporary mismatch, and I don’t think they are undercover on debt. We have sufficient amount of cover as far as the assets are concerned; may be they have defaulted on their payments, and as a result the ratings agencies have downgraded them, and that has led to this kind of a cascading effect. But to me, as I understand, this money should come back to IL&FS and that should ultimately help them in resolving the asset liability mismatch situation or a liquidity situation in which they are right now.”
The heads of the SEC and CFTC often point out that they are running an IT museum. They have photographic evidence to prove it—the highest-tech background that The New York Times (on September 21, 2010) could find for a photo of Gregg Berman, the SEC’s point man on the Flash, was a corner with five PCs, a Bloomberg, a printer, a fax, and three TVs on the wall with several large clocks.
In addition, the rapid growth of the video game industry led to an increased demand for video games, but which the manufacturers over-projected. An analyst for Goldman Sachs had stated in 1983 that the demand for video games was up 100% from 1982, but the manufacturing output increased by 175%, creating a surplus in the market.[4] Raymond Kassar, the CEO of Atari, had recognized in 1982 that there would become a point of saturation for the industry, but did not expect this to occur until about half of American households had a video game console; at the time, only about 15 million machines had been sold, far below this expected point.[4]
US data remains strong. Manufacturing conditions remained strong in the New York and Philadelphia regions and the Markit manufacturing PMI rose, the Conference Board’s leading indicator is continuing to rise, and jobless claims fell further. Housing-related data, like starts, permits and sales, doesn’t have a lot of momentum but it’s consistent with a flat/modest contribution to economic growth and at least it’s a long way from the pre-GFC housing boom that went bust.

Brexit is another issue that continues to wax and wane. Lately the risks of a “no deal” or “hard Brexit”, which risk throwing the UK into recession, have shot up again. The EU rejection of the British Government’s Brexit plan with the “four freedoms” and the Irish border remain sticking points and time is running out. It’s still too early to take a bullish British pound bet.

On November 8, 2016, Donald Trump was declared to have been elected as the 45th president of the United States. During the evening and night of the 8th and through the morning of the 9th, global financial markets lost a tremendous amount of value—at one point, US markets had lost a trillion dollars in one of the biggest crashes ever. While the overnight US markets showed big losses, even hitting the circuit breakers, the day of November 9 closed with the three major stock indexes up over a point each. It's too early to tell what this means in the long term.

There are some good reasons for high valuations, such as the new, lower corporate tax rate, the generally business-friendly administration, a prolonged period of historically low interest rates, low unemployment, high consumer confidence, and soaring corporate earnings, just to name a few. I'd even go so far as to say that the fact that the Buffett Indicator doesn't take some of these things into account is perhaps its biggest flaw. For example, if you look at the stock market during a high-interest period and a low-interest period, examining stock valuations isn't exactly an apples-to-apples comparison.


Another criticism of certain conventional risk models, is that they regard market crashes as extremely unlikely. Market models suggested 2008 was an incredibly rare event. However, the 1930s crash was fairly similar. Having extremely improbable events just eighty years apart makes very little sense. Of course, we could be massively unlucky, but it is of course far more likely that the model is wrong. And by wrong, we should be clear that we mean inappropriate for the high stress environments of a crash. Most of the time these models hold up just fine, but at the extremes they don't.
These bold plans have led the rating agency Moody’s to downgrade Italy’s sovereign debt to one notch above junk.  Uncertainty in Italy is a major geopolitical factor weighing on global sentiment.  Investors are rightly concerned about the Rome-Brussels stand-off, given that Italy is the Eurozone’s third-largest economy and its debt is held by every major bank in Europe—and most in the U.S. As interest rates rise in Italy, the prospect of insolvency rises alongside.

To help maintain a clear head during stock market crashes, investors should remember that they are business owners -- not ticker symbol owners. While stock prices may plummet, the majority of companies with good business models and strong competitive advantages will likely see a far smaller negative impact to their underlying businesses during these periods. So, be sure to detach stock price performance from business performance.
A bull market -- just like the one the U.S. stock market has experienced since 2009 -- happens when investors are optimistic about the markets and the economy, and when demand outpaces supply, thus driving up share prices. As bull markets peter out -- they can last anywhere from two years to nine years -- all it takes is a significant market event to create a crisis of confidence among investors and draw more sellers into the market. This can create a stock market crash that leads to a bear market.
From October 6–10 the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) closed lower in all five sessions. Volume levels were record-breaking. The DJIA fell over 1,874 points, or 18%, in its worst weekly decline ever on both a points and percentage basis. The S&P 500 fell more than 20%.[36] The week also set 3 top ten NYSE Group Volume Records with October 8 at #5, October 9 at #10, and October 10 at #1.[37]
Whereas London was once the financial capital of western Europe, it remains to be seen if it will continue to be the financial capital of the European Union. Hence the drop in the value of the pound. Hence economic uncertainty for all companies which do business in the UK or the rest of the Continent. Will the UK fall into a recession? How will that affect global demand?
At the same time, affordable housing has plummeted. In 2010, 11 percent of rental units across the country were affordable for low income households. By 2016, that had dropped to just 4 percent. The shortage is the worst in cities where home prices have soared. For example, Colorado's stock of affordable rentals fell from 32.4 percent to only 7.5 percent since 2010. 
If you haven't been periodically rebalancing your portfolio, you may be invested more aggressively than you think. Someone who started out with a mix of 70% stocks and 30% bonds when this bull market began back in 2009 and simply re-invested all gains in whatever investment generated them, would have something close to a portfolio 90% stocks and 10% bonds today.
Or it may not be. Think about it. Doomsayers have pointed to any number of reasons in recent years why they believed the market was headed for a downturn: Standard & Poor's downgrading of U.S. Treasury debt in 2011; the growth-slowdown scare in China that sent stock prices down 12% in the summer of 2015; Brexit and the election of Donald Trump, both of which were supposed to be catalysts for a market rout. But none of these warnings panned out.
Our deficit and debt as numbers alone are kind of meaningless.. It only matters relative to other countries and relative to our GDP. For better or worse current economic theory under globalization seems to expect every country to grow and amass more debt while keeping those two values in some kind of balance. So it is hard even for an economist to say how relevant the size of the number is. And a lot of that theory is working out rather poorly for many Euro countries right now.
Dennis Cisterna III was kind enough to provide this article that discusses the key factors that drive the housing market. Dennis is Chief Revenue Officer of Investability Real Estate, Inc. and an expert on housing trends and economic indicators. I chose Dennis to write this piece because I was so impressed with his podcast interview on my show. Dennis talks about the actual numbers when it comes to new house builds, lending guidelines, and if we are in fact due for another housing crash anytime soon. I also did a lot of research on my own about lending guidelines, affordability, building starts, and other issues affecting the housing market.
Indian stock markets witnessed a steep and sudden sell-off in the afternoon deals on Friday. Rajat Sharma of Sana Securities told FE Online that stock markets are "extremely overvalued" and Sensex can fall even 2,000 points from here while NSE Nifty can correct by about 1,000 points. "Nothing has changed fundamentally, I mean we have the same macro-economic situation, etc, but when a sell-off happens, nobody can predict, Rajat Sharma said further. 

Still lacking sufficient demand from fundamental buyers or cross-market arbitrageurs, HFTs began to quickly buy and then resell contracts to each other—generating a “hot-potato” volume effect as the same positions were rapidly passed back and forth. Between 2:45:13 and 2:45:27, HFTs traded over 27,000 contracts, which accounted for about 49 percent of the total trading volume, while buying only about 200 additional contracts net.


I’m less concerned than our friends at the Fed. Businesses are rebelling in mass against Trump’s punitive tariffs on steel, aluminum, and lumber. Trump is still blind to his own economic idiocy as I write. Given the torrent of negative press on tariffs in recent weeks, I suspect that a member or two of his retinue will force him to see the light. They’ll force him sooner than later.
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