The American mobilization for World War II at the end of 1941 moved approximately ten million people out of the civilian labor force and into the war.[28] World War II had a dramatic effect on many parts of the economy, and may have hastened the end of the Great Depression in the United States.[29] Government-financed capital spending accounted for only 5 percent of the annual U.S. investment in industrial capital in 1940; by 1943, the government accounted for 67 percent of U.S. capital investment.[29]
Professor:        I certainly believe so, but this will happen with extreme volatility. I am more worried about the retail investor the so called silent majority. With this wild fluctuation, his survival rate in the market is next to zero. He will not easily believe that the market will bounce back in the near term. You cannot blame him. His ability to withstand paper loss (temporary) is very small. So he will easily buckle and sell out. All I can say is that we are slowing moving into a panic mode. We still have to wait a while to see the green shoots. Are we ready to wait?
People who were caught in the 2008 crash are spooked that a 2018 bubble will lead to another crash. But that crash was caused by forces that are no longer present. Credit default swaps insured derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities. Hedge fund managers created a huge demand for these supposedly risk-free securities. That created demand for the mortgages that backed them.
But what drives the Toronto housing market? Will it succumb to the same fate as Vancouver or worse?   If you’re a buyer, you’re wondering which neighbourhoods and towns to focus on and whether this market will tank. If you’re a seller, you’re wondering if you’re going to miss the biggest payday of your life by not selling. If you’re close to retirement, you may want to carefully review your choice not to sell. 2017 is a grand time for you to sell and move onto a better life.
Adjust accordingly. If you have to take some course of action, change the stocks you're buying. Historically, some stock sectors do better than others in declining markets. For example, high-dividend stocks tend to be less volatile than other stocks. They are usually insulated from big bear market drops due to the dividend alone. Sector-wise, utility stocks, consumer cyclicals, service-oriented companies, food and pharmaceutical stocks tend to do better during an economic downturn than other companies. Some stock sectors just tend to outperform others during a bear market. The bad news is that when the market does turn bearish again these stocks won't rise as fast and as high as, say, technology or emerging market stocks.
Filia pointed to the increasing frequency of value-at-risk shocks, or swift market corrections, as an indication of fragility for global markets. The report cited as evidence the VIX volatility index spike in February, the Turkish lira's dramatic drop in recent months, and Italy's roller-coaster bond price moves, among other examples, as early warning signals for "system instability of the broader financial network."
The difficulty in getting a mortgage combined with extremely high student debt strapping down the millennial generation continues to nudge people toward renting. Americans don’t have the savings they used to have that allowed them to put a down payment on a home. Historically, the average savings rate of a person’s income was 8.3 percent, but today that number is 5.5 percent. Rising education and housing costs continue to burden the new generation of potential home buyers, driving down home ownership rates in the U.S.
Hey DK. Since your brain is pegged to the 4th dimension. The $30 K I lost was back in 2002 when the dot com blew. I was making $90 K a year. Like spilled beer. Did not affect me. I was trading $20 K blocks at a time day trading. Its called the market maker, making the stock move. These are things you could only dream of. You cant even understand foreign exchange. The Yuan is not pegged to the dollar as you claim. You should stick to simple shit like beans and bullets. Economics is beyond you…

Although we’ve seen more recognition of cryptocurrencies as investment vehicle, they’re still considered high-risk investments. Some see Bitcoin as safe-haven in case of a global crash due to its decentralized nature, the low correlation with the stock markets and the limited supply. Though, there is no reliable data available on how cryptocurrencies behave during a stock market crash. However, if you’re willing to take the risk, adding a small percentage of Bitcoin or cryptocurrency stocks to a diversified portfolio could be a worthwhile investment decision.
Professor:        I certainly believe so, but this will happen with extreme volatility. I am more worried about the retail investor the so called silent majority. With this wild fluctuation, his survival rate in the market is next to zero. He will not easily believe that the market will bounce back in the near term. You cannot blame him. His ability to withstand paper loss (temporary) is very small. So he will easily buckle and sell out. All I can say is that we are slowing moving into a panic mode. We still have to wait a while to see the green shoots. Are we ready to wait?

Indeed, Tesla’s performance has all the makings of a stock market crash chart to reflect the irrational exuberance of 2018. Investors have pushed Tesla’s stock market valuation to such a degree that it has infected the healthiest hedge fund. It’s a one-stock Black Monday warning! Note the Tesla stock market chart. It’s moving on hope and expectations alone; every time the quarter results are released, the stock tends to drop.
The big banks expect interest rates to continue to rise to between 2.25 per cent and 2.75 per cent by the end of 2019. And that will keep turning the screws on Canadians’ budgets, with more money going toward mortgage and other debt payments and less left as disposable income. Climbing rates will also continue to raise the bar for wannabe homeowners who to pass the federal mortgage stress test in order to qualify for a new mortgage.
"Dollar dominated the last 24 hours as the rupee collapsed to a fresh all-time low on spot. Policymakers tried everything, monetary intervention, and verbal steroids and even tried to circulate rumours about an "oil window". Nothing worked," said a Kotak Securities report. "The RBI added fuel to fire by denying any attempts to introduce special dollar window for the oil marketing companies." Moreover, rising Italian credit spreads whacked the euro, further pressuring the rupee.

If you are concerned about how much you could lose on some of your largest positions, you can also think about using stop loss orders to mitigate potential losses. For each stock, you can set a few price levels below technical support where you will begin to reduce the size of the position. It’s best to do this long before stock prices begin to fall so that your decisions are rational and not driven by emotions. Stop losses are not generally a strategy used by long term investors. However, they can help you manage the emotional pain of a bear market.


One mitigation strategy has been the introduction of trading curbs, also known as "circuit breakers", which are a trading halt in the cash market and the corresponding trading halt in the derivative markets triggered by the halt in the cash market, all of which are affected based on substantial movements in a broad market indicator. Since their inception, circuit breakers have been modified to prevent both speculative gains and dramatic losses within a small time frame.[43]
Indian stock markets witnessed a steep and sudden sell-off in the afternoon deals on Friday. Rajat Sharma of Sana Securities told FE Online that stock markets are "extremely overvalued" and Sensex can fall even 2,000 points from here while NSE Nifty can correct by about 1,000 points. "Nothing has changed fundamentally, I mean we have the same macro-economic situation, etc, but when a sell-off happens, nobody can predict, Rajat Sharma said further. 
The next day, "Black Tuesday", October 29, 1929, about 16 million shares traded as the panic selling reached its peak. Some stocks actually had no buyers at any price that day ("air pockets"[citation needed]). The Dow lost an additional 30 points, or 12 percent.[11][12][13][14] The volume of stocks traded on October 29, 1929, was a record that was not broken for nearly 40 years.[12]
Predicting housing prices is famously difficult. And forecasting housing meltdowns like the one that nearly brought down the global financial system in 2008 may be downright impossible. For now, though, the way experts cautiously paint the future for next year is closer to the picture of a landing plane than that of a rocket ship plummeting earthward.
As of July 2011, only one theory on the causes of the flash crash was published by a Journal Citation Reports indexed, peer-reviewed scientific journal.[50] It was reported in 2011 that one hour before its collapse in 2010, the stock market registered the highest reading of "toxic order imbalance" in previous history.[50] The authors of this 2011 paper apply widely accepted market microstructure models to understand the behavior of prices in the minutes and hours prior to the crash. According to this paper, "order flow toxicity" can be measured as the probability that informed traders (e.g., hedge funds) adversely select uninformed traders (e.g., market makers). For that purpose, they developed the Volume-Synchronized Probability of Informed Trading (VPIN) Flow Toxicity metric, which delivered a real-time estimate of the conditions under which liquidity is being provided. If the order imbalance becomes too toxic, market makers are forced out of the market. As they withdraw, liquidity disappears, which increases even more the concentration of toxic flow in the overall volume, which triggers a feedback mechanism that forces even more market makers out. This cascading effect has caused hundreds of liquidity-induced crashes in the past, the flash crash being one (major) example of it. One hour before the flash crash, order flow toxicity was the highest in recent history.
Its pretty obvious she's completely failed. She may as well have said she never wrote the current Brexit deal, Barnier did or Merkel did. In more enlightened times her head would be on a spike by now, down by the Thames. But what do we expect from just the latest traitor to Sovereignty on the list, that includes: Heath, Major, Brown and the rest . . We need a new broom to sweep all this rubbish away, once and for all . .
You have to pay ~2.5-4% in unavoidable ownership fees as an owner even with your mortgage paid off (property taxes, insurance, maintenance, amortized transaction costs, etc). Even if we’re generous and assume that’s just 2.5%, that means all that that equity is only making you 2.5% (1.5% in Vancouver) in rent savings. If you don’t have the equity, you have to pay more than than to borrow it from the bank (or take on the risk of paying more). If you do and you invest it, then that can be substantial savings.
It’s not over.  The worst October stock market crash since 2008 got even worse on Friday.  The Dow was down another 296 points, the S&P 500 briefly dipped into correction territory, and it was another bloodbath for tech stocks.  On Wednesday, I warned that there would be a bounce, and we saw that happen on Thursday.  But the bounce didn’t extend into Friday.  Instead, we witnessed another wave of panic selling, and that has many investors extremely concerned about what will happen next week.  Overall, global stocks have now fallen for five weeks in a row, and during that time more than 8 trillion dollars in global wealth has been wiped out.  That is the fastest plunge in global stock market wealth since the collapse of Lehman Brothers, and it is yet another confirmation that a major turning point has arrived.
The Roaring Twenties, the decade that followed World War I that led to the crash,[3] was a time of wealth and excess. Building on post-war optimism, rural Americans migrated to the cities in vast numbers throughout the decade with the hopes of finding a more prosperous life in the ever-growing expansion of America's industrial sector.[4] While the American cities prospered, the overproduction of agricultural produce created widespread financial despair among American farmers throughout the decade.[4] This would later be blamed as one of the key factors that led to the 1929 stock market crash.[5]

Of course, that's an average and the market's return is seldom steady and predictable. Yet, it's important to remember that these attractive returns include many periods when the markets have lost a quarter or half their value, or worse. As a result, even if you know a crash is coming at some point, which it very likely is at some point in the coming years, then it's not a reason to avoid stocks. Provided you can stick with it you'll likely see decent returns from diversified global stocks even including the catastrophic crashes that scare you.

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