Some enduring red flags, Filia said, are in the form of politics and geopolitics — growing populism across Europe as well as Middle East and Asian tensions. But more than that he sees shrinking liquidity — central bank spending flows in reverse for the first time in a decade — as the "first real crash test" for momentum and volatility, as well as rising interest rates.
Markets can also be stabilized by large entities purchasing massive quantities of stocks, essentially setting an example for individual traders and curbing panic selling. However, these methods are not only unproven, they may not be effective. In one famous example, the Panic of 1907, a 50 percent drop in stocks in New York set off a financial panic that threatened to bring down the financial system. J. P. Morgan, the famous financier and investor, convinced New York bankers to step in and use their personal and institutional capital to shore up markets.

Filia pointed to the increasing frequency of value-at-risk shocks, or swift market corrections, as an indication of fragility for global markets. The report cited as evidence the VIX volatility index spike in February, the Turkish lira's dramatic drop in recent months, and Italy's roller-coaster bond price moves, among other examples, as early warning signals for "system instability of the broader financial network."
"I've been in retailing 30 years and I have never seen any category of goods get on a self-destruct pattern like this", a Service Merchandise executive told The New York Times in June 1983.[12] The price war was so severe that in September Coleco CEO Arnold Greenberg welcomed rumors of an IBM 'Peanut' home computer because "IBM is a company that knows how to make money". "I look back a year or two in the videogame field, or the home-computer field", Greenberg added, "how much better everyone was, when most people were making money, rather than very few".[15] Companies reduced production in the middle of the year because of weak demand even as prices remained low, causing shortages as sales suddenly rose during the Christmas season;[16] only the Commodore 64 was widely available, with an estimated more than 500,000 computers sold during Christmas.[17] The 99/4A was such a disaster for TI, that the company's stock immediately rose by 25% after the company discontinued it and exited the home-computer market in late 1983.[18] JC Penney announced in December 1983 that it would soon no longer sell home computers, because of the combination of low supply and low prices.[19]
The US Fed meets on September 26th but the CME Fed tool is already indicating a probability of 95% for a rate hike by the Fed. That is not good news for the Indian markets. It will impel the RBI to front end another rate hike to prevent any risk of capital market outflows. Also higher Fed rates will lead to a stronger dollar and that by itself will put pressure on the INR, which is already vulnerable at this point of time.
The US Fed meets on September 26th but the CME Fed tool is already indicating a probability of 95% for a rate hike by the Fed. That is not good news for the Indian markets. It will impel the RBI to front end another rate hike to prevent any risk of capital market outflows. Also higher Fed rates will lead to a stronger dollar and that by itself will put pressure on the INR, which is already vulnerable at this point of time.
Our deficit and debt as numbers alone are kind of meaningless.. It only matters relative to other countries and relative to our GDP. For better or worse current economic theory under globalization seems to expect every country to grow and amass more debt while keeping those two values in some kind of balance. So it is hard even for an economist to say how relevant the size of the number is. And a lot of that theory is working out rather poorly for many Euro countries right now.
Whether Professor Sornette is right or not that a critical point can be anticipated, the entire concept of market self-organization deals a blow to the “fundamental” approach to investing in equity markets – the idea that opinion-based research can lead to investment success when it seems quite apparent that outcomes cannot be predicted even when initial conditions are known.
Deanna, yes I did read and write about it actually. It’s horrible for Californians. Brown’s lack of hope, imagination, and entrepreneurialism reflects what’s happened in the US in the last 30 years. If it doesn’t benefit the multinationals, you’ll see neglect, and “water opportunity” is just scorned. Whoever solves California’s water problem will be a Trillionaire many times over!
After a very brief rally earlier in the week, stocks have been getting hammered again.  The S&P 500 has now fallen for 9 out of the last 11 trading sessions, and homebuilder stocks have now fallen for 19 of the last 22 trading sessions.  It was a “sea of red” on Thursday, and some of the stocks that are widely considered to be “economic bellwethers” were among those that got hit the hardest…
Scenario:  Big money chases few homes, and when governments persist in stopping or not supporting land development, speculators become more confident prices will rise further. Then a politician or FED president steps in with their reactive solution, at the end of the business cycle where employment and profits will begin to drop. Speculators/investors pull out fast, and the slide begins.
The S&P 500 ended 1999 at  1,469 and was recently at 2,814. That's an increase of 92% -- almost doubling -- over the nearly 19 years represented in the table, and it represents an average annual gain of about 3.5%. That's well below the average annual gain, driving home the lesson that over any particular investment period, your average returns may be well above or below average.
Housing has typically been a hedge against inflation. This time it will be inflation that kills the housing market. President Bush recently spent 800 Billion in 2 days. Federal spending is up over 30%. The Medicare bill will cost the US between 2 and 3 TRILLION dollars in the next 20 years. Only through devaluing the dollar (which has already begun) and massive tax increases, can the government hope to pay its bills. This means inflation, and lots of it. The people that are investing in real estate have a chronic myopia when it comes to economic history.
As the large seller's trades were executed in the futures market, buyers included high-frequency trading firms—trading firms that specialize in high-speed trading and rarely hold on to any given position for very long—and within minutes these high-frequency trading firms started trying to sell the long futures contracts they had just picked up from the mutual fund.[23] The Wall Street Journal quoted the joint report, "'HFTs [then] began to quickly buy and then resell contracts to each other—generating a 'hot-potato' volume effect as the same positions were passed rapidly back and forth.'"[23] The combined sales by the large seller and high-frequency firms quickly drove "the E-Mini price down 3% in just four minutes".[23]
When you think of oil production, the Middle East or OPEC is probably what comes to mind. But substantial shale finds in the United States in recent decades have pushed the nation the No. 3 spot in terms of daily production as of 2016, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. At 8.88 million barrels of oil production per day, the U.S. is responsible for more than 10% of global production. 
Tulip Mania (in the mid-1630s) is often considered to be the first recorded speculative bubble. Historically, early stock market bubbles and crashes have also their roots in socio-politico-economic activities of the 17th-century Dutch Republic (the birthplace of the world's first formal stock exchange and market),[3][4][5][6][7] the Dutch East India Company (the world's first formally listed public company), and the Dutch West India Company (WIC/GWIC) in particular. As Stringham & Curott (2015) remarked, "Business ventures with multiple shareholders became popular with commenda contracts in medieval Italy (Greif, 2006, p. 286), and Malmendier (2009) provides evidence that shareholder companies date back to ancient Rome. Yet the title of the world's first stock market deservedly goes to that of seventeenth-century Amsterdam, where an active secondary market in company shares emerged. The two major companies were the Dutch East India Company and the Dutch West India Company, founded in 1602 and 1621. Other companies existed, but they were not as large and constituted a small portion of the stock market (Israel [1989] 1991, 109–112; Dehing and 't Hart 1997, 54; de la Vega [1688] 1996, 173)."[8]

Sensex and Nifty observed a major crash in the afternoon trade today following a sharp fall in housing finance stocks. However, benchmark indices soon rebounded as Sensex recovered nearly 900 points after falling over 1,100 points and Nifty reclaimed 11,100-level within a matter of minutes in afternoon session. The 30-share index fell 1127.58 points, or 3.03 percent, to hit an intra-day low of 35,993.64. The index was trading 171.39 points, or 0.46 percent, lower at 36,949.83 at the time of reporting.

In a less extreme market—for example, one where the Warren Buffett Indicator is around 100 or less—the risks are easier to identify, count, and classify. But in a situation where this indicator is approaching 140%, it’s clear that we’re long past the realm of logic. The markets are ignoring all risks while the Dow keeps climbing. Yet, there is one major risk at the macro level that could slam open the doors for a crash.
The NASDAQ has surged by a similar percentage. In other words, the winds that brought Trump to the White House fueled some $5.0 trillion into Wall Street’s market capitalization. How much more energy can this already remarkable—and improbable—rally have? Chances are the rally will taper off. It could do this gradually or with a bang—that is, a crash.

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Thanks for writing the article. It makes some sense. but how about if the amounts are very different? I am currently considering selling my home which will now sell for $1.7 mil. when I purchased 6 years ago it was just under $600k. a 20% drop would be a gain of $340k which would be nice. But the main reason I would consider selling is to re purpose the tax free gains and invest in a range of different investments. I never intended for my house to be an investment tool, but as it has given me such large gains it seems foolish not to take them. In the perhaps 5% to 10% chance the housing market does continue to soar upwards then I guess I’ll never own again! but I will still have considerable assets that will secure me for life.

Yes, he’s applying national stats only to local markets. It’s difficult to deny the severe housing shortage in most markets inlcuding Los Angeles, New York, San Jose, San Francisco, Dallas, Seattle, detc. He takes aim at Millennials, whose dreams he doesn’t regard as worthy. There are a lot of people who would like to stifle new housing growth as a way to increse the value of their own property investments. As long as they control politics, housing shortages will continue.
However, what I like about the first strategy is that the dollar amounts are limited up front (and we don’t have to make any assumptions about future implied volatility). The worst case scenario is you spend 0.5% of your portfolio every month buying worthless put options. The only way they would all be worthless is if the stock market went almost straight up for the entire year. And in that case, the equity portfolio should do far better than the losses spent on this sort of insurance against a crash.
"I've been in retailing 30 years and I have never seen any category of goods get on a self-destruct pattern like this", a Service Merchandise executive told The New York Times in June 1983.[12] The price war was so severe that in September Coleco CEO Arnold Greenberg welcomed rumors of an IBM 'Peanut' home computer because "IBM is a company that knows how to make money". "I look back a year or two in the videogame field, or the home-computer field", Greenberg added, "how much better everyone was, when most people were making money, rather than very few".[15] Companies reduced production in the middle of the year because of weak demand even as prices remained low, causing shortages as sales suddenly rose during the Christmas season;[16] only the Commodore 64 was widely available, with an estimated more than 500,000 computers sold during Christmas.[17] The 99/4A was such a disaster for TI, that the company's stock immediately rose by 25% after the company discontinued it and exited the home-computer market in late 1983.[18] JC Penney announced in December 1983 that it would soon no longer sell home computers, because of the combination of low supply and low prices.[19]
As the year drew to a close, the Bureau of Economic Analysis revised its growth estimate higher. It said that the nation’s gross domestic product had increased 0.5 percent in the third quarter. Its prior estimate said it had shrunk 0.5 percent. It seemed the U.S. economy could shrug off a housing downturn and banks’ liquidity constraints. The Dow ended the year just slightly off its October high, at 13,264.82.
The housing market experienced modest but steady growth from the period of 1995 to 1999. When the stock market crashed in 2000, there was a shift in dollars going away from the stock market into housing. To further fuel the housing bubble there was plenty of cheap money available for new loans in the wake of the economic recession. The federal reserve and banks praised the housing market for helping to create wealth and provide a secured asset that people could borrow money to help the economy grow. There was a lot of financial innovation at the time which included all sorts of new lending types such as interest adjustable loans, interest-only loans and zero down loans. As people saw housing prices going up, they were stepping over each other to buy to get in on the action. Some were flipping homes in an effort to take advantage of market conditions. If you understand fractional banking, you would know that with a 10% reserve requirement, in theory, it would mean that 10 times that money can be created for each dollar. With 0% down needed to buy new homes, an unlimited supply of money could be created. With each loan, banks would quickly securitize the loan and pass the risk off to someone else. Rating agencies put AAA ratings on these loans that made them highly desirable to foreign investors and pension funds. The total amount of derivatives held by the financial institutions exploded and the total % cash reserves grew smaller and smaller. In large areas of CA and FL, there were multiple years of prices going up 20% per year. Some markets like Las Vegas saw the housing market climb up 40% in just one year. In California, over ½ of the new loans were interest only or negative-amortization. From 2003 to 2007 the number of subprime loans had increased a whopping 292% from 332 billion to 1.3 trillion.
Most importantly, China’s debt binge was taken up in record time; soaring by over 2,000% in the past 18 years. And this earth shattering debt spree wasn’t used to generate productive assets. Rather, it was the non-productive, state-directed variety, which now requires a constant stream of new debt to pay off the maturing debt. Therefore, the schizophrenic communist party is caught between the absolute need to deleverage the economy; and at the same time, trying to maintain the growth mirage with additional stimulus measures.
Research at the New England Complex Systems Institute has found warning signs of crashes using new statistical analysis tools of complexity theory. This work suggests that the panics that lead to crashes come from increased mimicry in the market. A dramatic increase in market mimicry occurred during the whole year before each market crash of the past 25 years, including the recent financial crisis. When investors closely follow each other's cues, it is easier for panic to take hold and affect the market. This work is a mathematical demonstration of a significant advance warning sign of impending market crashes.[19][20]
While there are risks for local bubbles in markets experiencing inorganic growth, like the Miami condo market for example, it’s wise for investors to focus more on their own investment strategy and less on speculation of the overall market. If able to identify and clearly understand a market and its economy, investors can find success with single-family investments.
Preparation is key. The best time to react to any potential market crash is before it occurs. Not after. Reacting in the moment can lead to expensive and costly mistakes. For example, if you saw that socks were on sale, you'd be more interested in buying socks. However, when it comes to stocks, people take a different view. When stocks are on sale, as can occur in a market crash, then often investors' instincts are to run away. Thinking about your strategy ahead of time and writing it down, just in a couple of paragraphs, can be key. Then if the markets do crash, make sure to look at that document before you act.
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