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The current bull market is now in its 10th year. We have no idea when it might end and give way to a bear market. However, it’s inevitable that at some point it will. Twice during 2018 we have already seen a spike in market volatility. This inevitably leads to fears of a market crash. The truth is that a stock market crash can never really be predicted. People who predicted crashes in the past are the same people who predicted crashes in the years they didn’t happen.

Hi Gord. Thanks for this informative piece. Its best info I’ve found on the net. I plan to invest in a $250K – $300K property in Ontario without living in it as I am in UAE. Which town of Ontario do you suggest I should invest in to keep my rental income coming, along with chance of property appreciation. Toronto is surely very expensive now so we are think about these towns: Oshawa, Guelp, berries or Milton…what would you do if you had this much of savings and wanted to invest in Ontario Market for 2 years
Throughout his presidency, questions arose from his handling of various events, including one self-inflicted crisis after another. Tensions rose as he fired Michael Flynn and then FBI director James Comey. The selloff on the morning of May 17, 2017 occurred after reports that Comey was asked to drop the formal investigation into Flynn. If these allegations are true, this could represent the same sort of obstruction of justice which lead to the impeachment calls and, ultimately, resignation of President Richard Nixon.

But what drives the Toronto housing market? Will it succumb to the same fate as Vancouver or worse?   If you’re a buyer, you’re wondering which neighbourhoods and towns to focus on and whether this market will tank. If you’re a seller, you’re wondering if you’re going to miss the biggest payday of your life by not selling. If you’re close to retirement, you may want to carefully review your choice not to sell. 2017 is a grand time for you to sell and move onto a better life.
Some experts cite the euphoria of stock markets during their bull runs. They suggest the heightened unrealistic expectations create a platform for disaster and when reality strikes, truth launches panicked sell offs. Some say the overvalued stocks, economy, and general optimism present right is a sure predecessor of a crash. It may have been that way in 1987.
Following the sharp plunge in the stock market, Looks like a technical sell-off, Madhusudan Kela of Reliance Capital told ET Now. Their short-term liquidity is very very good and this is a speculative unwinding in share markets, Madhusudan Kela said. Long-term investor, if you understand the company and faith in management, excellent opportunity to buy these companies; if you think the management is good and will come out stronger, then it’s a good opportunity to buy the shares, Madhusudan Kela said further.
US data remains strong. Manufacturing conditions remained strong in the New York and Philadelphia regions and the Markit manufacturing PMI rose, the Conference Board’s leading indicator is continuing to rise, and jobless claims fell further. Housing-related data, like starts, permits and sales, doesn’t have a lot of momentum but it’s consistent with a flat/modest contribution to economic growth and at least it’s a long way from the pre-GFC housing boom that went bust.
It’s hard prepping on limited funds especially with young children, believe me I know. Every two weeks when I get groceries I take an extra $20 and get basic staples to store in my emergency pantry. It doesn’t seem like much but it adds up especially If you use it a Aldis, shop n save, etc. Then when I have extra cash I use it on the other important things besides food. Just keep going your doin a lot better than most. Your kids will thank you for it. 🙂
The un prepared survivors become canibals and begin to eat each other for food. Ted Turner and his elite buddies sit back and watch the show go down from satiltes in orbit and the cleansing procees commenses in time for the Hunger Games reset. The survivors run to the outskirts of the city to allow the rotting decalying bodies to finish decomposing, to return to scavange the abundance of resurces, batteries, etc
Did you ever stop to think about how goods and services can’t teleport? We don’t have teleportation technology – or magic, for that matter. So when a president/congress decides to move the economy, it takes *time* for the economy to react. Policies take time to come in force, markets take time to guage impacts and respond accordingly, equilibrium is established only after a long series of interractions. It takes *years* not days or weeks. You don’t judge a president (or congress) by what happens immediately after they take office (read: the economic meltdown during Obama’s first term, or the economic uptick during Trump’s first few months). You look at what happens two years into their term of office, with acknowledgement of the context.
Although this latest round of fiscal and monetary stimulus has not had the anticipated economic effect to date, it has produced a negative effect on the Chinese yuan. Leaving some to wonder if China is finally losing control over its currency. In August 2015, an unexpected devaluation in the yuan led to a capital flight as Chinese companies, citizens and investors sought to protect themselves from further declines in the currency. If the yuan weakens too quickly again—either naturally or by another planned devaluation—this would add even more chaos to the already fragile global markets.

There are other mitigating factors too such as the strengths in the economy, foreign investors buying property, and rising optimism and confidence since Donald Trump won the election.  At this point, we’re wondering if Obama and Clinton are relieved not to have to face the mess they created? Trump seems to be up to the task and yet, he has purportedly said he would enjoy watching the crash, even if it takes down some of his real estate empire. Is this just a comment on high home prices?


Sixth, Europe, too, will experience slower growth, owing to monetary-policy tightening and trade frictions. Moreover, populist policies in countries such as Italy may lead to an unsustainable debt dynamic within the eurozone. The still-unresolved “doom loop” between governments and banks holding public debt will amplify the existential problems of an incomplete monetary union with inadequate risk-sharing. Under these conditions, another global downturn could prompt Italy and other countries to exit the eurozone altogether.
Stock valuations aren’t extended and can support higher bond yields (the spread between the forward earnings yields and 10-Year Treasury yield is roughly 300 basis points, far above its long-term average). GDP growth is below trend, and every recession since 1970 has been preceded by above-trend GDP growth (GDP has followed a nice trend since World War II, and we are well below that trend currently due to a slow recovery from a big 2008 wipe-out). Debt levels remain reasonable and in line with long-term averages (net corporate debt to GDP is well off record highs, and simply in line with its long-term average).

This book has lots of good statistical information to back up its premises...which seem to boil down to...Buy a home within your means (and he does define how to find that out, which is a good thing if you can't figure it out on your own)...Anticipate that the home market could go down as interest rates rise making your home harder to sell in a pinch (to his credit, he tells you how to avoid that too)...and a few other common sense rules of buying that could be applied to many things. If a person is going to spend 6 figures on anything, you would think that they would take the time to learn what they are doing, but it is obvious to the author and to many other people watchers in the world that too many people just don't put effort into watching where they put their money. So, if you are a person who carefully spends your money without rushing into any purchase, you probably have enough sense to not have to buy this book; and if you are person who is just the opposite, you probably aren't too concerned even now about learning anything about your home purchase, so you aren't even reading this review. Last note: if you were going to buy properties to use for investment purposes, this book could be of assistance. Hope this helps.
As a Young Family (married with one child) home buyer, we made a loss when we sold out to move to the Toronto area and currently rent. Our landlord is selling up a the Townhouses in our area have grown from $280,000 10 years ago to one just selling a few days ago for $630,000. Last month they were selling for $450,000. We now have no option but to continue renting and are now looking at the city for a Rental Condo (which is now cheaper than the 3 hour daily �suburb commute) . We didn’t even have the money to buy when it was worth $280,000. Our house hold income is around $80,000 a year. The reality is, the average Canadian has a debt load at a level even higher than the unsustainable US pre 2008 crash.
A truly stunning result of these investigations is that the real-life frequency and size of market returns bear a notable resemblance to what is obtained by running very simple computer models. This also goes for earthquakes, solar flares, forest fires, and river floods: most of the simulations yield similar results to real life where events are frequent but small, but occasionally some gigantic one appears from nowhere.
Fast forward thirty years. I’ve discovered an analog chart model that correlates the markets of the 1980s to the markets of the 2010s. Specifically, it correlates the S&P 500 from 1978 to 1987 to the S&P 500 from 2010 to 2018. The correlation rate? 94%. In other words, this model shows that the stock market of the past eight years is trading similar to the stock market of the 1980s.
1st, sorry you lost your home. That said, had you read your loan documents you’d have seen the language advising you that loans are bought and sold on the secondary market all the time and the originator did not NEED your permission to do so. The sale of your loan to another bank, investor, Fannie, etc., had no effect on your payment, interest rate, term, etc. So the sale of your loan, regardless of how many times it was repackaged and sold, did not cause you to lose your house. If along the way the new holder of your “note” did not have an auto pay option, that was up to you follow up on and find out exactly HOW/WHERE they wanted you to make your payment. Again, sorry you lost your home, but the sale of mortgage backed securities (your loan) has no effect on the Payor (you) as terms cannot be altered (now THATS something they would need your approval on). The only way an eventual noteholder could foreclose on you is if you failed to make your payments as required…Did you stop making payments for some reason? A lot of good people got hurt in the crisis but there seems to be more to this than a repeated sale of the original note…I’ve been in my present home 26 years, have had several mortgages sold and sold again with no issues…most important thing is to confirm with your present lender that they had, in fact sold your note and the party telling you they now own your note are, in fact, who they say they are. Best of luck.
It look really bad in 2012 and I took everything and pushed it conservative. Bad timing. I wasn’t thinking and I wasn’t looking at the charts. I am now and I know exactly what to do. I retire in just about 15 years. By then, if we don’t have a full on collapse, I expect to be STINKING RICH. Everyone could be. All you have to do is look at the charts. The right ones of course. I’ve been sworn to secrecy and that is all the clue I will give, but, suffice it to say that there is a pattern that even a monkey could see if he looked.
The Trump tax reform plan might trigger a fall in prices that could lead to a collapse. Congress has suggested removing the deduction for mortgage interest rates. That deduction totals $71 billion. It acts like a federal subsidy to the housing market. The tax break helps homeowners have an average net worth of $195,400. That's much greater than the $5,400 average net worth of renters. Even if the tax plan keeps the deduction, the tax plan takes away much of the incentive. Trump's plan raised the standard deduction.
It is just another business cycle, albeit an extended one, coming to an end: not TEOTWAWKI. Therefore it is safe to say that the downturn will be extended too because foreclosures (as an example) have not been assimilated from the last crash yet; and a new round of bankruptcies and foreclosures will follow the economic decline for those who are levered.

So how do you react to this? The initial reaction towards a market crash prediction would be selling off all the assets. There are two reasons why this approach is not ideal. One, the market is a tricky place, which quite often messes with predictions. Even in 2012, speculations were rife that a market crash was imminent, but nothing of that sort happened.
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