Agreed, the timing is huge, I know a few people who sold in 2007-2008 in Vancouver and, well, it’s 5 years later and now they’re looking at probably another 5 at least if the market does crash. They thought a crash was coming and were wringing their hands when GFC hit. Then the credit taps were turned to 11 and prices in parts of Vancouver are way up from then, including properties these people were eyeing on MLS. Now it’s another few hundred K on top at least. Ouch.
Consider hiring a fee-only financial advisor to kick the tires on your portfolio and provide an independent perspective on your financial plan. In fact, it’s not uncommon for financial planners to have their own financial planner on their personal payroll for the same reason. An added bonus is knowing there’s someone to call to talk you through the tough times.
The equity market actually peaked in late 2007, and appeared to be undergoing a correction in early 2008. However, after a brief recovery in April 2008 failed to reach the all-time highs, the market fell for the following 11 months. By March 2009 the S&P 500 index had fallen more than 55%. Unprecedented action by the Federal Reserve to stimulate the economy and market led to the beginning of the bull market that has continued until today.
The cost of ownership in the most high priced markets is going up even more. Why? The limitation on the mortgage interest deduction to $750K and the limitation on the sales and property tax deduction to $10K. With the increase in interest rates, the partial non deductibility of interest and taxes, the overall cost of ownership is going up. Most people will feel the punch in their guts next year when they file the 2018 taxes. That is when most folks would realize what hit them was not a pleasant surprise!
One particular kind of stock to give special consideration to are dividend-paying stocks. That's because they can simply be great investments on their own and also because when they fall in price, their dividend yields get pushed up. That's a matter of simple math, because a dividend yield is just a fraction -- a stock's total annual dividend divided by its recent stock price. As a simple example, imagine a company that pays out $0.25 per quarter per share, or $1 per year per share. Imagine that it's trading for $50 per share pre-crash and that it falls to $40 post-crash. The dividend stays the same -- though companies in deep trouble may indeed cut or eliminate their dividend. Divide $1 by $50 and you'll get 0.02, or a 2% dividend yield. Divide $1 by $40, and you'll get 0.025, or a 2.5% yield. If the stock falls in half, to $25 per share, its dividend yield will be 4%. That's why market downturns can be great for dividend investors -- not only are dividend yields boosted, but depressed stock prices can also be bargains, with the promise of growth when the market recovers.
The next day, "Black Tuesday", October 29, 1929, about 16 million shares traded as the panic selling reached its peak. Some stocks actually had no buyers at any price that day ("air pockets"[citation needed]). The Dow lost an additional 30 points, or 12 percent.[11][12][13][14] The volume of stocks traded on October 29, 1929, was a record that was not broken for nearly 40 years.[12]
The trade-sensitive industrial stocks led the Dow Jones Industrial Average to a record closing high on Thursday, the last of Wall Street's main indexes to fully regain ground since a correction that began in January with all three major US indexes finishing higher as trade worries subsided. Microsoft Corp and Apple Inc rose 1.7% and 0.8%, respectively. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 251.22 points, or 0.95% to 26,656.98, the S&P 500 gained 22.8 points, or 0.78% to 2,930.75 and the Nasdaq Composite added 78.19 points, or 0.98% to 8,028.23.
I’m ready, but nervous. IF, this is the big one, and you are wanting this or think you will pop some corn and enjoy the show, then you are unaware of the big picture. Yes it may be enjoyable for a while (I get no joy from this BTW), it WILL effect you in ways you haven’t yet thought of. Yes those of us that are prepared will weather it better than those not prepared, but this isn’t going to be fun in the long run.
Whereas London was once the financial capital of western Europe, it remains to be seen if it will continue to be the financial capital of the European Union. Hence the drop in the value of the pound. Hence economic uncertainty for all companies which do business in the UK or the rest of the Continent. Will the UK fall into a recession? How will that affect global demand?
The difficulty in getting a mortgage combined with extremely high student debt strapping down the millennial generation continues to nudge people toward renting. Americans don’t have the savings they used to have that allowed them to put a down payment on a home. Historically, the average savings rate of a person’s income was 8.3 percent, but today that number is 5.5 percent. Rising education and housing costs continue to burden the new generation of potential home buyers, driving down home ownership rates in the U.S.
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Robbins has also sold a crazy number of books. And while he may not be best known for his investing chops, he draws on the likes of Ray Dalio, Jack Bogle and others for the inspiration behind his #1 best-seller “Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook,” which MarketWatch earlier this year counted among the eight best books about money published in 2017.
Stepping back from statistics and the numbers, it's a general perception that stock market crashes are a response to unexpected and severe bad news. That would make sense right? The market is a very sophisticated machine whereby each individual buyer and seller trades on their information and the result is a market price that is, in a sense, smarter than any individual.
Some of this volatility reflects the uncertainty that switching the White House between two major parties always provides, but it also demonstrates how global markets see a Trump administration as unpredictable, unmoored, and even dangerous. Investors seeking safer investments turned to the stability of bonds, precious metals, and even cash while they wait to see what will come.
Housing has typically been a hedge against inflation. This time it will be inflation that kills the housing market. President Bush recently spent 800 Billion in 2 days. Federal spending is up over 30%. The Medicare bill will cost the US between 2 and 3 TRILLION dollars in the next 20 years. Only through devaluing the dollar (which has already begun) and massive tax increases, can the government hope to pay its bills. This means inflation, and lots of it. The people that are investing in real estate have a chronic myopia when it comes to economic history.
Throughout his presidency, questions arose from his handling of various events, including one self-inflicted crisis after another. Tensions rose as he fired Michael Flynn and then FBI director James Comey. The selloff on the morning of May 17, 2017 occurred after reports that Comey was asked to drop the formal investigation into Flynn. If these allegations are true, this could represent the same sort of obstruction of justice which lead to the impeachment calls and, ultimately, resignation of President Richard Nixon.
Note that the source of increasing "order flow toxicity" on May 6, 2010, is not determined in Easley, Lopez de Prado, and O'Hara's 2011 publication.[50] Whether a dominant source of toxic order flow on May 6, 2010, was from firms representing public investors or whether a dominant source was intermediary or other proprietary traders could have a significant effect on regulatory proposals put forward to prevent another Flash Crash. According to Bloomberg, the VPIN metric is the subject of a pending patent application filed by the paper's three authors, Maureen O'Hara and David Easley of Cornell University, and Marcos Lopez de Prado, of Tudor Investment Corporation.[58]
The Fed underestimated the size and impact of the mortgage-backed securities market. Banks had hired "quant jocks" to create these new securities. They wrote computer programs that sorted packages of mortgages into high-risk and low-risk bundles. The high-risk bundles paid more but were more likely to default. The low-risk bundles were safer, but paid less.
Obviously, some prediction of the market's downfall is going to turn out to be right. The market will go into a major slump again at some point. After all, since 1929 we've suffered through 20 bear markets where stock prices have fallen 20% or more, and even before the current turbulence, we've endured 26 corrections of at least 10% but less than 20%. But it's impossible to know in advance whether heightened volatility or even a decline that appears to gathering momentum will turn out to be The Next Big One.

The North American video game crash had two long-lasting results. The first result was that dominance in the home console market shifted from the United States to Japan. By 1986, three years after its introduction, 6.5 million Japanese homes—19% of the population—owned a Family Computer, and Nintendo began exporting it to the U.S.;[44] by 1987 the Nintendo Entertainment System was very popular in North America.[48] When the U.S. video game market recovered in the late 1980s the NES was by far the dominant console, leaving only a fraction of the market to a resurgent Atari. By 1989, home video game sales in the United States had reached $5 billion, surpassing the 1982 peak of $3 billion during the previous generation. A large majority of the market was controlled by Nintendo; it sold more than 35 million units in the United States, exceeding the sales of other consoles and personal computers by a considerable margin.[49] Other Japanese companies also rivaled Nintendo's success in the United States, with Sega's Mega Drive/Genesis in 1989 and NEC's PC Engine/TurboGrafx 16 released the same year.
China’s economy has been on a downward trajectory in the past few months, with auto and retail sales on the decline. Fixed-asset investment rose a mere 5.3% in the January-August period from a year earlier. It was the most lackluster growth rate since 1992. This was mostly a planned slowdown; an edict from the government that realized its economy was beginning to resemble a Ponzi scheme.

On September 20, the London Stock Exchange crashed when top British investor Clarence Hatry and many of his associates were jailed for fraud and forgery.[8] The London crash greatly weakened the optimism of American investment in markets overseas.[8] In the days leading up to the crash, the market was severely unstable. Periods of selling and high volumes were interspersed with brief periods of rising prices and recovery.

However, what I like about the first strategy is that the dollar amounts are limited up front (and we don’t have to make any assumptions about future implied volatility). The worst case scenario is you spend 0.5% of your portfolio every month buying worthless put options. The only way they would all be worthless is if the stock market went almost straight up for the entire year. And in that case, the equity portfolio should do far better than the losses spent on this sort of insurance against a crash.

October 2018 is turning out to be a lot like October 2008.  The S&P 500 has now fallen for 12 of the last 14 trading days, and it is on pace for its worst October since the last financial crisis.  But the U.S. is actually in much better shape than the rest of the world at this point.  Even though they have fallen precipitously in recent days, U.S. stocks are still up 3 percent for the year overall.  On the other hand, global stocks (excluding the U.S.) are now down more than 10 percent for the year, and they are down more than 15 percent from the peak of the market in January.  All it is going to take is a couple more really bad trading sessions to push global stocks into bear market territory.


There's always a chance that the sell-off can morph into a decline of 10 percent or more from the market's September peak, which could thrust the market into its second so-called price correction of the year, Zaccarelli says. Still, he predicts that any downturn won't become a bear market, or 20 percent drop, and will instead turn out to be a good buying opportunity for investors with time to ride out any storm.
My guess is we’ll see a continued decline overall this fall with the luxury market seeing a bigger drop. The liberal’s vacant home tax would be pathetic, just a psychological tactic to scare away Asian buyers. The overall Canadian market isn’t strong which indicates the economy isn’t great. The Toronto market has a lot of downward momentum that could continue right through to spring. Vancouver has bounced back from government meddling so maybe by spring Toronto can do it too. Can Toronto continue to be isolated from the Canadian economy? The NAFTA deal is what could send the Toronto Housing Market and the economy crashing. Overall, homeowners would be wise to sell because prices are high and availability limited. Why wait for lower prices in 6 months?
DSP Mutual Fund sold Dewan Housing bonds this week to boost its cash holdings before an expected tightening of market liquidity in September, Kalpen Parekh, president of DSP, said in an interview. The firm sold 3 billion rupees ($41.6 million) of the bonds to express “our interest view, not a credit view,” Parekh said. “This has been done across issuers over last few days.”
The NASDAQ has surged by a similar percentage. In other words, the winds that brought Trump to the White House fueled some $5.0 trillion into Wall Street’s market capitalization. How much more energy can this already remarkable—and improbable—rally have? Chances are the rally will taper off. It could do this gradually or with a bang—that is, a crash.
This sluggish growth and a near 30% plunge in Shanghai shares prompted swift action from the Chinese government, which announced plans to cut personal income taxes and cut the Reserve Requirement Ratio for the fourth time to encourage more leverage on top of the debt-disabled economy. The government has even bought ETF’s to prop of the sinking Chinese stock market. As a result, shares recently surged 4% in one day. However, more than half of those gains were quickly reversed the following day as investors took a sober look at whether the Chinese government is starting to lose its grip on the economy. 
As longtime China watchers know, the country’s still-immature markets are in many ways more bubble-prone than their Western counterparts, thanks to heavy involvement from retail investors who often take cues from government policy, rather than quaint notions like earnings. Tanking Chinese stocks—the Shanghai Composite is now down nearly 25% from its January peak—could therefore be taken...
Is funny, the tropical depression is well away from us but we are getting an extremely wet weather system over the state, they call it an anti-cyclone, whatever that is, all i know is i could use some sunshine, been raining for weeks, only one or two days here and there that didnt rain. Too damn wet, crops rotting in the field, at least the market crops, oh well, such is life as a farmer!
If you’ve gone with a “set it and forget it” strategy — like investing in a target-date retirement fund, as many 401(k) plans allow you to do, or using a robo-advisor — diversification already is built in. In this case, it’s best to sit tight and trust that your portfolio is ready to ride out the storm. You’ll still experience some painful short-term jolts, but this will help you avoid losses from which your portfolio can’t recover.
Right now, Republicans have control of the legislative branch of the U.S. government, albeit by a slim margin in the Senate. Having a majority of seats in both houses of Congress, and a Republican President in Donald Trump, increases the probability of legislation being passed. Not to mention, the GOP is often viewed as a party that’s friendlier to businesses. This Republican majority is responsible for passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in December 2017, which slashed the peak marginal corporate income tax rate to 21% from 35%.
The Fed underestimated the size and impact of the mortgage-backed securities market. Banks had hired "quant jocks" to create these new securities. They wrote computer programs that sorted packages of mortgages into high-risk and low-risk bundles. The high-risk bundles paid more but were more likely to default. The low-risk bundles were safer, but paid less.
The real estate market turns downward. Homeowners and commercial property owners often suffer severe financial loss after a stock market crash (like the loss of a job or significantly reduced demand for housing.) That scenario picks up steam and causes demand for new homes and apartments to fall, even as property owners may suddenly be unable to afford their loan payments, leading to property foreclosures and personal bankruptcies.
After a one-day recovery on October 30, where the Dow regained an additional 28.40 points, or 12 percent, to close at 258.47, the market continued to fall, arriving at an interim bottom on November 13, 1929, with the Dow closing at 198.60. The market then recovered for several months, starting on November 14, with the Dow gaining 18.59 points to close at 217.28, and reaching a secondary closing peak (i.e., bear market rally) of 294.07 on April 17, 1930. The following year, the Dow embarked on another, much longer, steady slide from April 1931 to July 8, 1932, when it closed at 41.22—its lowest level of the 20th century, concluding an 89 percent loss rate for all of the market's stocks.
It was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States, when taking into consideration the full extent and duration of its after effects.[1] The crash, which followed the London Stock Exchange's crash of September, signalled the beginning of the 12-year Great Depression that affected all Western industrialized countries.[2]
Agreed, the timing is huge, I know a few people who sold in 2007-2008 in Vancouver and, well, it’s 5 years later and now they’re looking at probably another 5 at least if the market does crash. They thought a crash was coming and were wringing their hands when GFC hit. Then the credit taps were turned to 11 and prices in parts of Vancouver are way up from then, including properties these people were eyeing on MLS. Now it’s another few hundred K on top at least. Ouch.
Martial law is now implemented, the Natzi cabal suspends the election, and congratulate Donal Trump for his PR stunt, and he laughs his ass off because he happy to finally see the New World Oder commensing. Mr, you should see what we do to tritors, in regard to Edward Snowden. The drones have the locations of the people of interest and begin tactical strikes in broad daylight on veterans, patriots, whites, etc. MS 13, he mexican army, the jihadist enter Texas and start launch attacks, russain pulls into the Texas guld and does and anphibian invasion, China attacks Texas with the Mexacn army from the south, the russians come down from Colorado from the East North and south. Not a nice time or place to be in as i see.
The Wall Street Crash had a major impact on the U.S. and world economy, and it has been the source of intense academic debate—historical, economic, and political—from its aftermath until the present day. Some people believed that abuses by utility holding companies contributed to the Wall Street Crash of 1929 and the Depression that followed.[33] Many people blamed the crash on commercial banks that were too eager to put deposits at risk on the stock market.[34]
It is not just the uber rish who lose the most. It is the middle class workers. Those of us who have worked hard and survied years of down sizing in larger corporations who will lose a great deal…along with all those who also benifit from our generosity over the years. All the school supply drives, blood drives, holliday food drives to name a few. We try to contribute the amount to our 401’s to earn the companies matching benifits. We are pentalized for taking out our money until we reach the age of 59. Those of us who are to close to retiring don’t have the opportunity to recoup our money. So we will be faced with working to a much older age then we planned. So in reality…while we may be middle income…we don’t have the ability to just put out our money. If we lose a great portion of our 401’s and there is another housing market crash they have managed to chip away yet another chuck of middle imcome households. Sooner or later it will only be the very poor and the very rich! We need a solution to bring back the middle income and a solution for more and more folks to have the opportunity to move beyond lower income! We have done our best to prepare for what life might throw at us short term and long time, but I do believe it is going to be a bummpy ride, so buckle up my prepper friends.
Obviously, some prediction of the market's downfall is going to turn out to be right. The market will go into a major slump again at some point. After all, since 1929 we've suffered through 20 bear markets where stock prices have fallen 20% or more, and even before the current turbulence, we've endured 26 corrections of at least 10% but less than 20%. But it's impossible to know in advance whether heightened volatility or even a decline that appears to gathering momentum will turn out to be The Next Big One.
Bush came into office just as the terrorists mounted their attack. Clinton was the President previously. I think Bush was stunned at the attack just as he was sitting down in the Oval Office. Are you suggesting they attacked because of what they thought Bush might do in future? Half of the debt came with Obama so why is he innocent of all this? Why couldn’t the trillions dished out be tracked? Wouldn’t it have been better spent on badly needed infrastructure spending? Joe, I’m not sure you have a good argument here, but thanks for contributing.
During 1930 and 1931 in particular, unemployed workers went on strike, demonstrated in public, and otherwise took direct action to call public attention to their plight. Within the UK, protests often focused on the so-called Means Test, which the government had instituted in 1931 as a way to limit the amount of unemployment payments made to individuals and families. For working people, the Means Test seemed an intrusive and insensitive way to deal with the chronic and relentless deprivation caused by the economic crisis. The strikes were met forcefully, with police breaking up protests, arresting demonstrators, and charging them with crimes related to the violation of public order.[39]
These five tech and consumer service giants have accounted for a significant portion of the S&P 500’s and Invesco QQQ Trust’s gains in recent years. Further, data from Bloomberg finds that the original FANG stocks (minus Apple) are slated to grow sales at an average rate of 36% in the second quarter, which is four times faster than the average S&P 500 company.  However, the FAANG stocks aren’t impervious to a change of heart.
Mati Greenspan, an analyst with the trading platform eToro, told Business Insider on Tuesday that volumes from Japan and South Korea had been tailing off in recent days. Traders in these markets are usually buyers, and a large-scale exit could have created an imbalance in the market, with more sellers than buyers driving down prices and sparking a panic.
Note that the source of increasing "order flow toxicity" on May 6, 2010, is not determined in Easley, Lopez de Prado, and O'Hara's 2011 publication.[50] Whether a dominant source of toxic order flow on May 6, 2010, was from firms representing public investors or whether a dominant source was intermediary or other proprietary traders could have a significant effect on regulatory proposals put forward to prevent another Flash Crash. According to Bloomberg, the VPIN metric is the subject of a pending patent application filed by the paper's three authors, Maureen O'Hara and David Easley of Cornell University, and Marcos Lopez de Prado, of Tudor Investment Corporation.[58]
Network snapshots before (left) and during (right) the simulated flash crash. The last 400 transactions in the order-book are plotted by connecting the HFT agents who transact with each other. The node color indicates the inventory size of the HFT agent. When the market operates normally (left subplot), almost all of the HFT agents are in control of their inventory (greenish color). In crash period (right), most of the HFT agents gain large inventories (red) and the network is highly interconnected: over 85 percent of the transactions are HFT-HFT.[51]

According to estimates from JPMorgan Chase in June 2017, just 10% of all stock-trading volume is the result of investors picking stocks to buy and sell. The remainder of trading volume primarily derives from quantitative-based computer trading. Essentially, we’re talking about computer programs that aim to secure small profits via high-frequency trading (HFT) hundreds or thousands of times a day.
The mathematical description of stock market movements has been a subject of intense interest. The conventional assumption has been that stock markets behave according to a random log-normal distribution.[9] Among others, mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot suggested as early as 1963 that the statistics prove this assumption incorrect.[10] Mandelbrot observed that large movements in prices (i.e. crashes) are much more common than would be predicted from a log-normal distribution. Mandelbrot and others suggested that the nature of market moves is generally much better explained using non-linear analysis and concepts of chaos theory.[11] This has been expressed in non-mathematical terms by George Soros in his discussions of what he calls reflexivity of markets and their non-linear movement.[12] George Soros said in late October 1987, 'Mr. Robert Prechter's reversal proved to be the crack that started the avalanche'.[13][14]
It used a hodge-podge menu of about $150 billion in short- and long-term debt, and $180 billion in repurchase, or "repo" agreements, as collateral on short-term repo loans. Once investors began doubting the quality of the collateral Lehman was using, they largely stopped allowing the company to roll over the repo loans into the next 24-hour period, and began asking for their money back -- in full.
Also, be sure you're focused on percentages, not points, when thinking about stock market movements. This is something the media doesn't sufficiently understand, often reporting market drops in points instead of percentages. As an example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped by a whopping 1,175 points in a single day in February 2018, which sure sounds like a lot -- especially compared with 1987's "Black Monday," when the Dow fell 508 points. But in percentage points, it was a meaningful yet not catastrophic 4.6% decline -- while 1987's drop wiped out 22.6% of the market's value at the time. The Dow was near 26,000 at the time of this writing, and the S&P 500 was around 2,800. At those levels, if the Dow "plunges" by 260 points, remember that it would be just a 1% move. Even a 1,000-point drop would be just a 3.85% decline.
Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology suggests that there is evidence the frequency of stock market crashes follows an inverse cubic power law.[15] This and other studies such as Prof. Didier Sornette's work suggest that stock market crashes are a sign of self-organized criticality in financial markets.[16] In 1963, Mandelbrot proposed that instead of following a strict random walk, stock price variations executed a Lévy flight.[17] A Lévy flight is a random walk that is occasionally disrupted by large movements. In 1995, Rosario Mantegna and Gene Stanley analyzed a million records of the S&P 500 market index, calculating the returns over a five-year period.[18] Researchers continue to study this theory, particularly using computer simulation of crowd behaviour, and the applicability of models to reproduce crash-like phenomena.
During this growth boom, the SEC found it increasingly difficult to prevent shady IPOs and conglomerates from proliferating. In early 1987, the SEC conducted numerous investigations of illegal insider trading, which created a wary stance among many investors. At the same time, inflation and overheating became a concern due to the high rate of economic and credit growth. The Federal Reserve rapidly raised short term interest rates to temper inflation, which dampened some of stock investors’ enthusiasm. Many institutional trading firms began to utilize portfolio insurance to protect against further stock dips. Portfolio insurance is a hedging strategy that uses stock index futures to cushion equity portfolios against broad stock market declines. As interest rates rose, many institutional money managers scrambled to hedge their portfolios at the same time. On October 19th 1987, the stock index futures market was flooded with billions of dollars worth of sell orders within minutes, causing both the futures and stock markets to crash. In addition, many common stock investors attempted to sell simultaneously, which completely overwhelmed the stock market.
The past week saw “risk on” with the latest escalation in the US/China trade conflict being less than feared. This saw shares rally, bond yields rise, commodity prices gain, the US$ fall and the A$ rise. US shares rose 0.9%, Eurozone shares gained 2.1%, Japanese shares rose 3.4%, Chinese shares rose 5.2% and Australian shares rose 0.5%. While the Australian share market participated in the global share market rebound, over the last week it has gone back to underperforming again, reflecting its relatively defensive/high-yield characteristics.
However, with managements of these NBFCs trying to allay fears and dismissing reports of debt defaults, the market staged a recovery. Reports also emerged that DSP Mutual Fund had managed to sell some short-term paper of DHFL at 11 percent discount in a bid to build liquidity against its exposure to IL&FS. This led to the massive fall in the market as well.
A market collapse can wipe out what economists call "paper wealth." Paper wealth is money tied up in investments like the stock market or the real estate market that could be sold for a gain, but hasn't yet. In contrast, "real wealth" refers to actual, physical assets, like the money in your bank account, or a vehicle you own that is fully paid off and can be sold for a definite financial gain.

Adjust accordingly. If you have to take some course of action, change the stocks you're buying. Historically, some stock sectors do better than others in declining markets. For example, high-dividend stocks tend to be less volatile than other stocks. They are usually insulated from big bear market drops due to the dividend alone. Sector-wise, utility stocks, consumer cyclicals, service-oriented companies, food and pharmaceutical stocks tend to do better during an economic downturn than other companies. Some stock sectors just tend to outperform others during a bear market. The bad news is that when the market does turn bearish again these stocks won't rise as fast and as high as, say, technology or emerging market stocks.


The major factors that drive housing demand growth to Toronto: immigrant investors, better economy, low interest rates, increasing numbers of buyers in their home home buying years (millennials), and optimism all look on the upswing.  As mentioned in the Los Angeles Real Estate and US housing crash post, orecast post, here are the key factors that affect home prices:
What on earth could be responsible for such optimism? After all, the oft-repeated adage that Trump’s tax cuts have been feeding the bulls on Wall Street has run its course. The tax cuts have not been approved and with the divide in Congress—a divide also within Republicans themselves—there’s little chance of the major reductions occurring. Moreover, the U.S. debt now exceeds $20.0 trillion.
Investors bore the emotional scars from the crash for the next four years. On June 1, 2012, they panicked over a poor May jobs report and the eurozone debt crisis. The Dow dropped 275 points. The 10-year benchmark Treasury yield dropped to 1.443 during intraday trading. This was the lowest rate in more than 200 years. It signaled that the confidence that evaporated during 2008 had not quite returned to Wall Street. 
Indeed, Buffett's ability to tune out the noise and remain optimistic amid these downturns has played a vital role in his unrivaled performance over decades. Between 1965 and the end of 2017, Berkshire's market value has increased at an annualized rate of 20.9%, more than doubling the S&P 500's average annual growth of 9.9% during this same period. This 20.9% annualized growth rate for Berkshire's market value translates to a total return of 2,404,748%, obliterating the S&P 500's 15,508% gain during the same timeframe.

hcks, we’ve been looking all over Houston for you. We have reserved a seat for you on Niburu when it gets close enough to board via the secret mind control surf boards we’ve stashed away for those of us in the ” know.” We’re making sure you’ll be sitting next to Dave Hodges and your scientist friend, you know, the one whose name can never be mentioned lest the Earth be ravaged by brain eating dreadlock zombies, you know, THAT scientist friend. By the way, we have been able to confirm that Ted Turner is indeed and has been a cannibal for years now, so he’s looking forward to some fine dinning once the shtf next April. Stay on your normal frequency as we may need to transmit additional instructions to you without delay.
None of the research however, seems to be applied to human expectations, human happiness, and human panic. Human’s don’t pay attention to historical trends and data, nor what AI systems advise. They generally pay attention to now just like herding animals before a stampede. The signal that sets the herd off, could be one or two animals stumbling over a pothole.
The housing market will not grow forever, but it is hard to say when things will change. As Dennis said, real estate trends are very different in various parts of the country. Some parts of the country may see increasing prices for a few more years, while others may see a drop right away. I agree with Dennis that a housing crash like we saw in the mid-2000s is not coming anytime soon. I could see prices steadying out due to the affordability problems in some areas, especially if interest rates rise. Those two factors will not cause a crash when so few homes are being built and the quality of new loans is so high.
The next day, "Black Tuesday", October 29, 1929, about 16 million shares traded as the panic selling reached its peak. Some stocks actually had no buyers at any price that day ("air pockets"[citation needed]). The Dow lost an additional 30 points, or 12 percent.[11][12][13][14] The volume of stocks traded on October 29, 1929, was a record that was not broken for nearly 40 years.[12]
Slingshot, you have me laughing, thats a good one. Hopefully i am not responsible for run on the ammo. Me like everyone else, has heard it from the horses mouth. No one knows the exact date when it will hit in September. I was told by my scientist that by Novermber, people will literally be on the streets in mass, raising hell on earth, and he is not sure why, its just what he was told. Food and water shortage, civil war, revolution, uprising? etc. Who knows. All that crap i am tryping up, its what i am being told is likely to commense.
As you can see from the numbers Dennis has on the housing market, things are much better than they were before the last crash. Lending guidelines are much tougher no matter what you hear. I see posts on Facebook all the time about how people can get low-money-down loans now, and that means the housing crash is coming. Low-money-down loans have been available for decades, and that is not what caused the housing crash. Really bad loans to people who should not buy houses is what caused the housing crisis. Those loans do not exist anymore, as you can see by the data Dennis provided. Yes, it is possible to get a loan with less than a 600 credit score, but very few people are actually getting those loans. When you look at the housing market, you need to look at the real numbers of how many houses are being built, what kind of loans people are getting, and how much house people can afford. Houses are not being built like they were before. The loans people are getting are much higher quality, and the market is much more stable than it was before.
But you should also crunch a few numbers and then do a little soul searching. Estimate how Vanguard's suggested mix would have performed during the late 2007-through-early 2009 slump, when stock prices declined nearly 60% in value and investment-grade bonds gained about 7%. If you think you would cave and begin selling in the face of such a loss, you might want to dial back your target stock position a bit.
Although this latest round of fiscal and monetary stimulus has not had the anticipated economic effect to date, it has produced a negative effect on the Chinese yuan. Leaving some to wonder if China is finally losing control over its currency. In August 2015, an unexpected devaluation in the yuan led to a capital flight as Chinese companies, citizens and investors sought to protect themselves from further declines in the currency. If the yuan weakens too quickly again—either naturally or by another planned devaluation—this would add even more chaos to the already fragile global markets.
In 2013, the stock market finally recovered. In the first six months, it gained more points than in any year on record. Stock prices rose faster than earnings, creating an asset bubble. The Dow set over 250 closing records until February 2018. Fears of inflation and higher interest rates almost sent the Dow into a correction. Like many other past stock market crashes, it did not lead to a recession.
While the note's warnings are ominous and contradict many other more rosy outlooks for the current bull market, the London-based fund was on point in calling February's market correction weeks before it happened. Filia told CNBC in late January that stock valuations were in "bitcoin territory," "totally disconnected from fundamentals," and that markets were on the "edge of chaos."
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