Till August 1987 markets were favorable. In fact, as per the records of 25th August 1987, the Dow was of a 2722.44, which was almost a record hike. But after that, it only started to depreciate. An 8.4% drop was recorded on September 22nd, 1987. But then there was an increase of Dow again. A 5.9% increase was recorded on the 2nd of October 1987. But that was only for the time being. Once again the Dow started to fall and by October 19th the market had badly crashed; so much so that the Dow had dropped to 508. That would be almost a 22.6% drop on that single day. And if the drop had to be measured from the peak on 25th August, it was a whopping 36.7%. October 19th has since been referred to as the Black Monday.
During the 1920s, the U.S. stock market underwent rapid expansion, reaching its peak in August 1929, after a period of wild speculation. By then, production had already declined and unemployment had risen, leaving stocks in great excess of their real value. Among the other causes of the eventual market collapse were low wages, the proliferation of debt, a struggling agricultural sector and an excess of large bank loans that could not be liquidated.

Plummeting rupee: The domestic currency has set a fresh record this morning at 73.77 against the US dollar, after breaching the 73 mark yesterday. This weighed heavily on investor sentiment. It has depreciated nearly 14 per cent in the year so far. Meanwhile, the dollar has strengthened, boosted by a spike in Treasury yields following upbeat US data and the hawkish stance of the US Federal Reserve.
Interest rates are another important factor to consider. The Fed has only raised interest rates one half of a percent, but actual mortgage rates have come back down. That said, rates could eventually rise, so it’s wise for investors to prepare a strategy for when that occurs as it can impact their ability to finance an investment portfolio. Update: Mortgage rates have started to rise as the Fed continues to increase rates.
The next step that was taken was striving to make reforms in accounts. That implied that the companies now needed to make clearer balance sheets that disclosed more information on the transactions and investments of the company. The companies were asked to make a proper disclosure of all details such as stock options and investments that were made offshore by the companies. This was done to give the investors a better understanding of a company before they actually did invest in a particular company. Since this was not mandatory earlier, the investors couldn’t judge a company properly and invest in nonprofitable ventures which led to losses. Since the conflict of interest of the research firms led to losses, the new rule that was laid was that the investment bankers and the research analysts had to work separately. This was needed to be followed very strictly as there were high penalties charged in case of breach of regulations.

Market collapses can really hurt older investors. A stock market collapse can inflict damage across the board, demographically, but the impact on older Americans is especially onerous. Think of a 67-year-old retiree whose assets are largely tied up in the stock market: The value of those assets plummets after a market crash. While a 25-year-old has plenty of time to rebuild portfolio assets, a 67-year-old does not, and doesn't have the needed income any longer to even play "catch up" in the stock market.
These bold plans have led the rating agency Moody’s to downgrade Italy’s sovereign debt to one notch above junk.  Uncertainty in Italy is a major geopolitical factor weighing on global sentiment.  Investors are rightly concerned about the Rome-Brussels stand-off, given that Italy is the Eurozone’s third-largest economy and its debt is held by every major bank in Europe—and most in the U.S. As interest rates rise in Italy, the prospect of insolvency rises alongside.
So how do you react to this? The initial reaction towards a market crash prediction would be selling off all the assets. There are two reasons why this approach is not ideal. One, the market is a tricky place, which quite often messes with predictions. Even in 2012, speculations were rife that a market crash was imminent, but nothing of that sort happened.
Hi Sandy, I was just reading a post on Bnn.ca about how happy a couple who invested in rental housing investors were. They got their mortgage paid off and were living a lifestyle with retirement they couldn’t get any other way. If you’re becoming a landlord, make sure you do tenant screening really well. The economy in the Hamilton area and the housing market have been the best anywhere. It’s an excellent area with the escarpment and everything. Assuming you can afford the property, there are plenty of high paying tenants available. The rental squeeze won’t end, so you can pick and choose. Long term, it’s the smartest move to make. Unless, your tenant is prone to financial difficulty. One room for yourself? You’d better make a separate entrance thing, do it right, and it should change your life. Take a look at my posts over at ManageCasa and get immersed in the world of property management. Even if the market collapses, you’ll likely be fine if you manage your finances well. You can afford this right?
The internal reasons included innovations with index futures and portfolio insurance. I've seen accounts that maybe roughly half the trading on that day was a small number of institutions with portfolio insurance. Big guys were dumping their stock. Also, the futures market in Chicago was even lower than the stock market, and people tried to arbitrage that. The proper strategy was to buy futures in Chicago and sell in the New York cash market. It made it hard – the portfolio insurance people were also trying to sell their stock at the same time.[14]
Officials announced that new trading curbs, also known as circuit breakers, would be tested during a six-month trial period ending on December 10, 2010. These circuit breakers would halt trading for five minutes on any S&P 500 stock that rises or falls more than 10 percent in a five-minute period.[76][77] The circuit breakers would only be installed to the 404 New York Stock Exchange listed S&P 500 stocks. The first circuit breakers were installed to only 5 of the S&P 500 companies on Friday, June 11, to experiment with the circuit breakers. The five stocks were EOG Resources, Genuine Parts, Harley Davidson, Ryder System and Zimmer Holdings. By Monday, June 14, 44 had them. By Tuesday, June 15, the number had grown to 223, and by Wednesday, June 16, all 404 companies had circuit breakers installed.[78] On June 16, 2010, trading in the Washington Post Company's shares were halted for five minutes after it became the first stock to trigger the new circuit breakers. Three erroneous NYSE Arca trades were said to have been the cause of the share price jump.[79]
Shortly after the crash, the Federal Reserve decided to intervene to prevent an even greater crisis. Short-term interest rates were instantly lowered to prevent a recession and banking crisis. Remarkably, the markets recovered fairly quickly from the worst one day stock market crash. Unlike after the stock market crash of 1929, the stock market quickly embarked on a bull run after the October crash. The post-crash bull market was driven by companies that bought back their stocks that that the considered to be undervalued after the market meltdown. Another reason why stocks continued to rise after the crash was that the Japanese economy and stock market was embarking on its own massive bull market, which helped to pull the U.S. stock market to previously-unforeseen heights. After the 1987 stock market crash, as system of circuit breakers were put into place to electronically halt stocks from trading if they plummet too quickly.

A bear market evolves, often after a stock market crash, when investors grow pessimistic about the stock market, and as share prices fall as supply begins to outpace demand. Economists usually refer to a bear market as the result of the stock market losing 20% of its value over a 52-week period. They usually last about four years, although many don't last even that long. Historically, bear markets are a great time to buy stocks, as prices are low and value is high, and that's exactly what smart investors do.
Unemployment is near record lows. Corporations are bringing money from offshore accounts back into the U.S. Technology is driving thousands of new innovations. Of course, none of these conditions for prosperity will last forever, and there's certainly pockets of the U.S. still experiencing job loss and poverty. I loath being a cheerleader for stocks or the economy, but it's not as bad as it seems.

Book print ads| Online shopping | Matrimonial | Astrology | Jobs | Tech Community | Property | Buy car | Bikes in India | Free Classifieds | Send money to India | Used Cars | Restaurants in Delhi | Remit to India | Buy Mobiles | Listen Songs | News | TimesMobile | Real Estate Developers | Restaurant Deals in Delhi | Car Insurance | Gadgets Now | Free Business Listings | CouponDunia | Remit2India | Techradar | AliveAR | Getsmartapp App | ETMoney Finance App | Feedback | Auto

Benjamin Graham once observed that in the short term, the stock market is a voting machine. That's what it did today. It went up or went down based mostly on popular opinion, blown by the wind. In the long term, it's a weighing machine, which reflects the true value of businesses in their stock prices. That's why it's so important to think like an owner, and not just a trader.

With IL&FS getting closer to an absolute liquidity crunch and defaulting on its ICDs and CPs, the RBI has started tightening the vigilance on banks and other financial institutions. For starters, the RBI asked banks to be cautious about buying HFC bonds considering their exposure to IL&FS debt. IL&FS has outstanding debt to the tune of $12.5 billion and the market is rife with news that most of the HFCs have large exposure to IL&FS debt. Of course, the promoters of Indiabulls and DHFL have denied any exposure but the news refuses to go away. The mood was also sourced by a large Indian mutual fund selling DHFL bonds in the market at an above-market yield of almost 11%. That also took its toll on the markets.

U.S. stock futures rise sharply, with Wall Street getting a lift from a record Black Friday spending weekend and as oil prices rebound; Cyber Monday is expected to bring in $7.8 billion in sales, according to Adobe Analytics; Mitsubishi Motors dismisses Carlos Ghosn as chairman; General Motors plans to close all operations in Oshawa, Ontario, says a report.
Some of these motivations come from people all following each other, trying to predict the exact economic actions of other people all engaged in the same activity. (People who bought a stock at too high a price are looking for greater fools to unload it on.) While the market's open, everyone's trying to figure out the optimal value for the price of every stock everywhere. It's exhausting to think about the trillion or so variables that go into that immense labor of capitalism. It's crazy to consider how complicated the chains of cause and effect and overthinking are.
However, if China’s economy falters it might. Geopolitical turmoil concerning North Korea, Iran, Syria or Russia could also become a catalyst if things escalate enough. It’s most likely that the next market crash, whenever it occurs, will be the result of a perfect storm caused by several factors. But, since it’s not something anyone can predict, it’s best to concentrate on being prepared for a crash whenever it may occur.

Other scientists disagree with this notion, and note that market crashes are indeed “special.” Professor Didier Sornette, for example, a physicist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, argued that a market crash is not simply a scaled-up version of a normal down day but a true outlier to market behavior. In fact, he claims that ahead of critical points the market starts giving off some clues. His work focuses on interpreting these clues and identify when a bubble may be forming and, crucially, when it ends.
The affordability index continues to be stacked against potential home buyers. As housing and rental prices steadily increase, wages continue to stay relatively stagnant. Historically, the average income-to-housing cost ratio in the U.S. has hovered near 30 percent, but in some metro areas, that number is currently closer to 40 and even 50 percent! This strips away the opportunity to save money as a significant portion of a person’s monthly income is going to keeping a roof over their head.

It’s freeing up that $650,000 to invest with that really makes the strategy work, even if housing prices just plateau from here. Without going to my spreadsheets you can back-of-the-envelope it: yearly rents in Toronto are about 5% of house prices (i.e., yearly rent for a house that sells for $650k would be about $32.5k), and that gets you pretty much the same house (there are some nice rentals out there). In Vancouver, 4%.
Analysts say it's possible about 1 million barrels could be off the market by year-end. A much larger amount would squeeze supply and affect prices, Harris said. Already, companies have announced that they will step back from dealing with Iran, and Harris said the sanctions could create tensions between the U.S. and five countries that remain in the Iran nuclear deal. The U.S. broke from that group and decided on its own to reapply sanctions.
I’m less concerned than our friends at the Fed. Businesses are rebelling in mass against Trump’s punitive tariffs on steel, aluminum, and lumber. Trump is still blind to his own economic idiocy as I write. Given the torrent of negative press on tariffs in recent weeks, I suspect that a member or two of his retinue will force him to see the light. They’ll force him sooner than later.
×