On Black Monday, the markets were a bit different than today. That’s the explanation that many market optimists like to offer when they explain why another Black Monday can’t happen. That is, the market cannot lose some 23% of its value in a single trading session. They might be right, but in the opposite direction. The markets now have human as well as computer input through so-called robot trading. They have more variables and are more complicated. But information and risks travel much faster. If anything, the risks of a major market crash are higher today.
The Toronto situation is similar to Vancouver’s housing market where prices have really plummeted (43%). With the resolution of trade with the US, it appears no Toronto housing crash is imminent, and prices will return to their upward climb.  Inevitably, high interest rates and Canada’s lack of competitiveness will create a new crisis. New listings will likely drop as homeowners feel more comfortable with their employment outlook, and enjoy the housing price rise.

I’m in the market to buy a house in San Diego County and turn it into a vacation rental. I own one and it is very successful. I’m wondering if I should wait to buy, and if a recession would lead to a decrease in vacation rental bookings? I’m concerned and do not want to find myself under water. Any updates on this fascinating chain of discussion as of April, 2018?

PUBLICATIONS: India Today | India Today - Hindi | Business Today | Cosmopolitan | Oddnaari | Money Today | Reader's Digest | Good Housekeeping | Design Today | Time | Gadgets & Gizmos TELEVISION: Aaj TakRADIO: Ishq 104.8FM EDUCATION: Vasant Valley | Online Courses | U Learn Today | India Today Education ONLINE SHOPPING: India Today Diaries EVENTS: Agenda Aajtak | India Today Conclave | Ideaplex | India Today Woman's Summit | India Today Youth Summit | State Of The States Conclave | India Today Education Summit MUSIC: Music Today PRINTING: WELFARE: Care Today B2B MARKETPLACE: USEFUL LINKS :Newsletter | Partners | Press Releases SYNDICATIONS: IndiaContent


Book print ads | Online shopping | Matrimonial | Astrology | Jobs | Tech Community | Property | Buy car | Bikes in India | Free Classifieds | Send money to India | Used Cars | Restaurants in Delhi | Remit to India | Buy Mobiles | Listen Songs | News | TimesMobile | Real Estate Developers | Restaurant Deals in Delhi | Car Insurance | Gadgets Now | Free Business Listings | CouponDunia | Remit2India | Techradar | AliveAR | Getsmartapp App | ETMoney Finance App | Feedback | Auto
By the end of October, stock markets had fallen in Hong Kong (45.5%), Australia (41.8%), Spain (31%), the United Kingdom (26.45%), the United States (22.68%) and Canada (22.5%). New Zealand's market was hit especially hard, falling about 60% from its 1987 peak, and would take several years to recover.[5][6] The damage to the New Zealand economy was compounded by high exchange rates and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand's refusal to loosen monetary policy in response to the crisis, in contrast to countries such as West Germany, Japan and the United States, whose banks increased short-term liquidity to forestall recession and would experience economic growth in the following 2–3 years.[7]
Efforts to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement have proved more problematic than many in markets had hoped. Instead of ending Friday, talks with Canada will continue with expectations a deal could be reached within 90 days. Talks with Mexico had proceeded but the U.S. and Canada, as of Friday, appeared to have reached a sticking point.

That's a short term shock which makes a lot of people catch their breath. When a country as big as China has a short term shock (even in stocks), a lot of people in other countries get nervous. It's not just stocks, either; the price of oil has dropped dramatically in recent months—good for a lot of people who consume oil (airlines, transportation, individuals), but bad for people who produce oil (oil-rich countries, petrochemical refineries).
I am not an expert on what a president should do and most can be picked apart pretty readily by experts. But it would seem that the current trajectory of the Republicans under Trump is not one of reducing our deficit. Yes they want to scale back a great deal of spending. The problem is they want to dump a lot of that savings back into a bloated military budget and on top of that are considering drastic tax cuts. No analysis thus far has been at all optimistic about any potential increase in growth outrunning the addition this will make to our debt over the long term. So if that number is a concern neither party has shown a willingness to fix it.
Throughout his presidency, questions arose from his handling of various events, including one self-inflicted crisis after another. Tensions rose as he fired Michael Flynn and then FBI director James Comey. The selloff on the morning of May 17, 2017 occurred after reports that Comey was asked to drop the formal investigation into Flynn. If these allegations are true, this could represent the same sort of obstruction of justice which lead to the impeachment calls and, ultimately, resignation of President Richard Nixon.
On October 24, many of the world's stock exchanges experienced the worst declines in their history, with drops of around 10% in most indices.[38] In the US, the DJIA fell 3.6%, i.e. not as much as other markets.[39] Instead, both the US dollar and Japanese yen soared against other major currencies, particularly the British pound and Canadian dollar, as world investors sought safe havens. Later that day, the deputy governor of the Bank of England, Charles Bean, suggested that "This is a once in a lifetime crisis, and possibly the largest financial crisis of its kind in human history."[40]
In years when there are midterm elections, CFRA says the returns have been erratic, and the S&P has averaged a 1 percent decline in September, going back to 1946. But it's often just temporarily bad news for the market, if history is a guide. In those midterm years, the market most often has rallied in the final quarter for an average gain of 7.5 percent.
Hi Sadaf, Thanks and as you saw, the economy is fairly strong so towns well outside the GTA might be the best bet for a 2 year time frame. Check out Orillia. This is a town that never took off which is a shame because it’s right on the highway and Lake Couchiching, close to cottage country, and prices are low. They’ve remodeled the town park waterfront and it still has a nice small town feel. Here’s an example:https://www.royallepage.ca/en/property/ontario/orillia/120-dunlop-street/7142115/mls30615008/ of a house near the town. $300k is about as low as you’ll get. The Orillia housing market could take off as “stress tested out” homebuyers get desperate for an affordable home to buy further out from the GTA.

This post delves briefly into the theory and factors involved in market crashes, corrections and selloffs including investor expectations and mood, FED decisions, government meddling and AI systems (Note: even the people who make Artificial intelligence and self-learning algorithms have admitted they don’t understand how the AI systems make decisions. They learn and make decisions independent of human input and may not be  able to report to humans how and why they acted).


Hi Lavanya. Some believe the sky over Toronto will fall in 2018, but with rentals disappearing, it’s safe to say rental income property owners will get their price. Prices won’t go down, and may actually boom if the economy takes off in 2018. Buying a rental income property, living in the upper floor and getting tenants to help with the mortgage is just plain smart. That helps with the housing crisis as well! Good luck with your rental property.
Finally, don't think you can avoid market crashes by getting out of stocks before one. That's "market timing," and it rarely works. Index-fund pioneer John Bogle has quipped, "Sure, it'd be great to get out of stocks at the high and jump back in at the low... [but] in 55 years in the business, I not only have never met anybody who knew how to do it, I've never met anybody who had met anybody who knew how to do it."
Benjamin Graham once observed that in the short term, the stock market is a voting machine. That's what it did today. It went up or went down based mostly on popular opinion, blown by the wind. In the long term, it's a weighing machine, which reflects the true value of businesses in their stock prices. That's why it's so important to think like an owner, and not just a trader.

So, when will the stock market crash again? There is no way to accurately predict a bear market. The FAANG stocks (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google) have led the bull market over the last 9 years. If these stocks fail to keep their earnings momentum going, investors may lose confidence in the market. So far only Facebook and Netflix have disappointed investors, while Apple remains as strong as ever.
During this growth boom, the SEC found it increasingly difficult to prevent shady IPOs and conglomerates from proliferating. In early 1987, the SEC conducted numerous investigations of illegal insider trading, which created a wary stance among many investors. At the same time, inflation and overheating became a concern due to the high rate of economic and credit growth. The Federal Reserve rapidly raised short term interest rates to temper inflation, which dampened some of stock investors’ enthusiasm. Many institutional trading firms began to utilize portfolio insurance to protect against further stock dips. Portfolio insurance is a hedging strategy that uses stock index futures to cushion equity portfolios against broad stock market declines. As interest rates rose, many institutional money managers scrambled to hedge their portfolios at the same time. On October 19th 1987, the stock index futures market was flooded with billions of dollars worth of sell orders within minutes, causing both the futures and stock markets to crash. In addition, many common stock investors attempted to sell simultaneously, which completely overwhelmed the stock market.
The sandpile study was introduced in a 1987 paper by Per Bak, Chao Tang and Kurt Wiesenfeld, three scientists working at the Physics Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Ironically, the paper was presented to Physical Review Letters a few months before the stock market crash of October 1987, still today the largest ever one-day drop. The title was "Self-Organized Criticality" and falls within a branch of mathematics known as Complexity Theory, which studies how systems can organize themselves into unexpected behaviors arising from the interaction of its smallest and seemingly independent components.
Despite the UK's one-toe-in-the-water approach to the European Union, as evidenced by keeping the British Pound instead of the Euro as prime currency, the current state of the country is still tied to its membership. Trade deals will have to be renegotiated. Tarrifs may be in play. The two year process of political and economic disentangling is unprecedented, and that creates uncertainty.
That was six years ago. Funnily enough, the author of this blog, David Haggith, recently posted an article titled I Bet My Blog on a 2018 Economic Collapse. Basically, he is going to throw sh*t at the wall until something finally sticks – then he’ll pontificate to everyone about how his prediction was correct. It is worth noting that he also predicted that 2016 would be the year of the economic apocalypse and that he was “fairly sure” that stocks would slump in January, 2017.
×