The first microcomputers such as the Altair 8800 and Apple I were marketed to a niche of electronics hobbyists as most required assembly from a kit. In 1977, factory-assembled machines with BASIC in ROM became available, including the "Trio of '77": the Apple II, Commodore PET, and TRS-80 Model I. The latter two retailed for under $1,000, but lacked game joysticks and high-resolution color video.[5] Third-party developers created games for all of these platforms. The TRS-80 benefited from Radio Shack's retail stores, which displayed computers and accessories locally in an era where many personal computers were mail-ordered from manufacturers.

A little more than a week later, stocks sank after a tweet from the president challenged the idea that Russia’s missile defense system could shoot down American smart bombs. Investors clearly worry that Trump’s tweeted rhetoric could be taken the wrong way by one or more global leaders, leading to escalation, or even conflict. Should that happen, the stock market could tank.
The 1929 crash brought the Roaring Twenties to a halt.[35] As tentatively expressed by economic historian Charles P. Kindleberger, in 1929, there was no lender of last resort effectively present, which, if it had existed and been properly exercised, would have been key in shortening the business slowdown that normally follows financial crises.[32] The crash marked the beginning of widespread and long-lasting consequences for the United States. Historians still debate the question: did the 1929 Crash spark The Great Depression,[36] or did it merely coincide with the bursting of a loose credit-inspired economic bubble? Only 16% of American households were invested in the stock market within the United States during the period leading up to the depression, suggesting that the crash carried somewhat less of a weight in causing the depression.
1st, sorry you lost your home. That said, had you read your loan documents you’d have seen the language advising you that loans are bought and sold on the secondary market all the time and the originator did not NEED your permission to do so. The sale of your loan to another bank, investor, Fannie, etc., had no effect on your payment, interest rate, term, etc. So the sale of your loan, regardless of how many times it was repackaged and sold, did not cause you to lose your house. If along the way the new holder of your “note” did not have an auto pay option, that was up to you follow up on and find out exactly HOW/WHERE they wanted you to make your payment. Again, sorry you lost your home, but the sale of mortgage backed securities (your loan) has no effect on the Payor (you) as terms cannot be altered (now THATS something they would need your approval on). The only way an eventual noteholder could foreclose on you is if you failed to make your payments as required…Did you stop making payments for some reason? A lot of good people got hurt in the crisis but there seems to be more to this than a repeated sale of the original note…I’ve been in my present home 26 years, have had several mortgages sold and sold again with no issues…most important thing is to confirm with your present lender that they had, in fact sold your note and the party telling you they now own your note are, in fact, who they say they are. Best of luck.
However, independent studies published in 2013 strongly disputed the last claim.[52][53][54] In particular, in 2011 Andersen and Bondarenko conducted a comprehensive investigation of the two main versions of VPIN used by its creators, one based on the standard tick-rule (or TR-VPIN)[50][55][56] and the other based on Bulk Volume Classification (or BVC-VPIN).[57] They find that the value of TR-VPIN (BVC-VPIN) one hour before the crash "was surpassed on 71 (189) preceding days, constituting 11.7% (31.2%) of the pre-crash sample". Similarly, the value of TR-VPIN (BVC-VPIN) at the start of the crash was "topped on 26 (49) preceding days, or 4.3% (8.1%) of the pre-crash sample."[53]
However, the psychological effects of the crash reverberated across the nation as businesses became aware of the difficulties in securing capital market investments for new projects and expansions. Business uncertainty naturally affects job security for employees, and as the American worker (the consumer) faced uncertainty with regards to income, naturally the propensity to consume declined. The decline in stock prices caused bankruptcies and severe macroeconomic difficulties, including contraction of credit, business closures, firing of workers, bank failures, decline of the money supply, and other economically depressing events.
“One of the lessons that we all learned over and over again is try to cut through the noise and get to the fundamental driver of the stock market,” said Rich Weiss, chief investment officer and senior portfolio manager of multi-asset strategies at American Century Investments. “And the major driver has been, is, and will continue to be the strength of our economy.”
Stock markets witnessed a sudden sell-off in the afternoon dealings on Friday with Sensex crashing 1,128 points and Nifty falling well below 11,000-mark while DHFL nosedived 60% following the rout in NBFCs and housing finance companies. DHFL share price saw the biggest intraday plunge in its stock market trading history on Friday. Most of the housing finance companies bottomed to their respective multi-year lows in the trades. Shares of Yes Bank, Maruti Suzuki, HDFC, Infosys and Sun Pharma were the biggest negative point contributors to the headline indices.
BMO’s senior economist Benjamin Tal said in a Toronto Star report on October 14th, the Ontario Government’s Places to Grow program was primarily responsible for the fast rising prices in the GTA market. He also suggests other red tape factors worsened the situation. Prices in Newmarket, Markham, Mississauga, Richmond Hill, Bradford East Gwillimbury and Aurora have definitly crashed.
There's always a chance that the sell-off can morph into a decline of 10 percent or more from the market's September peak, which could thrust the market into its second so-called price correction of the year, Zaccarelli says. Still, he predicts that any downturn won't become a bear market, or 20 percent drop, and will instead turn out to be a good buying opportunity for investors with time to ride out any storm.
The GTA market is still a big market and only the Montreal housing market has a chance to outperform the GTA housing market through 2020. Housing markets in Calgary and Vancouver are down significantly.  However, the fall market is normally subdued, and buyers are likely waiting to see how the US elections pan out and whether the US housing market and economy will continue growing.
Umm sorry, but you know nothing relevant about the 2007-08 financial collapse and should do some research before claiming you know anything about financial theory. I agree with you that some interest is fine and fair, but Calvin is quite correct that in this case is was simple greed, gambling and dishonest on the part of your “bankers” that’s to blame. The subprime mortgage risk is not what caused the collapse in 2007-2008. What happened here is that you “bankers” even though they knew that interest rates were only in the 6% percent range, and thus grouping the mortgages together and selling them as investment could only net a profit in that same range (6%) instead claimed that they were worth 10-100 times what they were and sold them as such. Normal (not subprime mortgages) were regulated by law so that your cheating bankers(to be fair this was not all bankers, only dishonest ones) were not allowed to claim that they are worth anything more than the rate of return which is obviously the truthful and correct rate maximum that an investor would see. Sub-prime mortgages the other hand, were not regulated by law and nothing prevented your “bankers” falsely claiming and selling the mortgates as an investement with an expected derivative return many times higher than could ever be possible with the real interest rates.

The housing market will not grow forever, but it is hard to say when things will change. As Dennis said, real estate trends are very different in various parts of the country. Some parts of the country may see increasing prices for a few more years, while others may see a drop right away. I agree with Dennis that a housing crash like we saw in the mid-2000s is not coming anytime soon. I could see prices steadying out due to the affordability problems in some areas, especially if interest rates rise. Those two factors will not cause a crash when so few homes are being built and the quality of new loans is so high.
We haven’t had an October like this in a very long time.  The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down another 327 points on Thursday, and overall the Dow is now down close to 1,500 points from the peak of the market.  Unlike much of the rest of the world, it is still too early to say that the U.S. is facing a new “financial crisis”, but if stocks continue to plunge like this one won’t be too far away.  And as you will see below, many believe that what we have seen so far is just the start of a huge wave of selling.  Of course it would be extremely convenient for Democrats if stocks did crash, because it would give them a much better chance of doing well in the midterm elections.  This is the most heated midterm election season that I can ever remember, and what U.S. voters choose to do at the polls in November is going to have very serious implications for the immediate future of our country.
If you could only listen to one person's advice during a stock market crash, let that person be famed investor, Warren Buffett. Not only will the Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-B) (NYSE: BRK-A) chairman and CEO's advice serve you well, but his knack for keeping a clear head -- and even getting a bit greedy (more on that later) -- when everyone else is selling, may make his the only advice you need to navigate uncertain times.
A popular explanation for the 1987 crash was computerized selling dictated by portfolio insurance hedges.[11] However, economist Dean Furbush pointed out that the biggest price drops occurred during light trading volume.[12] In program trading, computers execute rapid stock trades based on external inputs, such as the price of related securities. Common strategies implemented by program trading involve an attempt to engage in arbitrage and portfolio insurance strategies. As computer technology became widespread, program trading grew dramatically within Wall Street firms. After the crash, many blamed program trading strategies for blindly selling stocks as markets fell, exacerbating the decline. Some economists theorized that the speculative boom leading up to October was caused by program trading, and that the crash was merely a return to normalcy. Either way, program trading ended up taking the majority of the blame in the public eye for the 1987 stock market crash. U.S. Congressman Edward J. Markey, who had been warning about the possibility of a crash, stated that "Program trading was the principal cause."[13]
The domestic equity markets started on a positive note on Friday following lower crude oil prices, a sharp recovery in Indian rupee value vs US dollar with Yes Bank shares plunging 34%. Yes Bank shares collapsed as much as 34% in the morning deals after India’s fifth-largest private sector lender informed that Rana Kapoor, MD & CEO, Yes Bank may continue as the MD & CEO till 31 January 2019. The benchmark Sensex rallied as much as 368.02 points to a day’s high of 37,489.24 while NSE Nifty recoiled to a day’s top of 11,346.80.
The latest round of US/China tariffs had been long flagged and both the US increase (10% on US$200 billion of imports from China, but not yet 25%) and China’s less than proportional retaliation (5-10% on US$60 billion of imports) were less than feared. This, along with reports China is planning a broad cut to its tariffs, was positive and leaves scope for negotiations. More significantly, we are still a long way from a full-blown trade war. After implementation of the latest round, only about 12% of US imports will be subject to increased tariffs and the average tariff increase across all imports will be just 1.6% - implying about a 0.2% boost to inflation and a less than 0.2% hit to growth. In China, the economic impact is likely to be less than 0.5% of GDP. This is all a long way from 1930 when the US levied a 20% tariff hike on all imports and other countries did the same making the depression “great”.
That being said, the Buffett Indicator, while it's not a flawless indicator, does tend to peak during hot stock markets and bottom during weak markets. And as a general rule, if the indicator falls below 80%-90% or so, it has historically signaled that stocks are cheap. On the other hand, levels significantly higher than 100% can indicate stocks are expensive.
When markets are very volatile, the overall trend tends to be down.  So what investors should be hoping for are extremely boring days on Wall Street when not much happens.  That has been the usual state of affairs for much of the past decade, but now volatility has returned with a vengeance.  The following is how CNBC summarized the carnage that we witnessed on Friday…
FIDough backed this up with, “Lots of research shows that most people tend to sell near the bottom, and reenter the market after it has gone up significantly.  In other words, most people do worse by trying to protect their money from market crashes.  The truth is, if you keep on investing and stick to your rebalancing plan throughout market cycles, you will do great.”
So it's nothing to do with the fact that you treated us with contempt. Took our money and when asked for some concessions you sent Cameron packing?Then you have tried to extort 39 billion form the British tax payer, rip Northern Ireland from the Uk to placate the ROI. You have threatened and punished your way throughout these negotiationsand you wonder why the majority in this country new it was time to leave?The booze has addled your brain pal if you think we can't get away from you quick enough.
Surging oil prices: Oil has been rallying as worries about Iran sanctions, which kick in on November 4, threaten global supply. International crude oil benchmark Brent yesterday hit a four-year high of $86.74 a barrel. Given that India is the world's third largest oil consumer, and heavily dependent on imports to boot, this is the biggest threat to the domestic economy.
You haven’t seen the effects of *any* of Trumps decisions yet. And Obama’s decisions had virtually zero impact on creating the Great Recession. There wasn’t time. Unless you believe in teleportation, magic, and instantaneous changes to the marketplace and if that’s the case, I’m a nigerian prince building a bridge and boy have I got a business proposition for you…

So, I should go ahead and take that last $15 I have in the bank out?? (better yet ill use it to fill up a gas can) Looks like this isn’t going to end well. The problem is the talking bimbos on the idiot box keep telling the lotus eaters of this world that everything is fine. (And they believe them!!) Have you tried to wake some of these people up to the fact that this will not end well?? My friends all thought I was crazy when I decided to move to the country to an off grid cabin in the woods two years ago, still not 100% ready but at least I don’t have to walk among them. God bless and prep on!

Hi Lavanya. Some believe the sky over Toronto will fall in 2018, but with rentals disappearing, it’s safe to say rental income property owners will get their price. Prices won’t go down, and may actually boom if the economy takes off in 2018. Buying a rental income property, living in the upper floor and getting tenants to help with the mortgage is just plain smart. That helps with the housing crisis as well! Good luck with your rental property.
In August, the wheat price fell when France and Italy were bragging of a magnificent harvest, and the situation in Australia improved. This sent a shiver through Wall Street and stock prices quickly dropped, but word of cheap stocks brought a fresh rush of "stags", amateur speculators and investors. Congress voted for a 100 million dollar relief package for the farmers, hoping to stabilize wheat prices. By October though, the price had fallen to $1.31 per bushel.[25]
You’re correct – some are predicting a blood bath – but they have been doing so for years. And I agree some segments of the Sydney property market will fall more than 20% – especially all those new apartments many of which were sold to unsuspecting investors. I’ve read the sources you’ve quoted and I’ve also read the comments from DR Phil Lowe – our RBA Governor – I don’t think he’s a fool – I’ll listen to him
1986 and 1987 were banner years for the stock market. These years were an extension of an extremely powerful bull market that had started in the summer of 1982. This bull market had been fueled by low interest rates, hostile takeovers, leveraged buyouts and merger mania. Many companies were scrambling to raise capital to buy each other out. The business philosophy of the time was that companies could grow exponentially simply by constantly acquiring other companies. In a leveraged buyout, a company would raise a massive amount of capital by selling junk bonds to the public. Junk bonds are bonds that pay high interest rates due to their high risk of default. The capital raised through selling junk bonds would go toward the purchase of the desired company. IPOs were also becoming a commonplace driver of market excitement. An IPO or Initial Public Offering is when a company issues stock to the public for the first time. “Microcomputers” now known as personal computers were become a fast growing industry. People started to view the personal computer as a revolutionary tool that would change our way of life, while creating wonderful business opportunities. The investing public eventually became caught up in a contagious euphoria that was similar to that of any other historic bubble and market crash. This euphoria made investors, as usual, believe that the stock market would “always go up.”
Large directional bets: Regulators say a large E-Mini S&P 500 seller set off a chain of events triggering the Flash Crash, but did not identify the firm.[23][24][25][26] Earlier, some investigators suggested that a large purchase of put options on the S&P 500 index by the hedge fund Universa Investments shortly before the crash may have been among the primary causes.[33][34] Other reports have speculated that the event may have been triggered by a single sale of 75,000 E-Mini S&P 500 contracts valued at around $4 billion by the Overland Park, Kansas firm Waddell & Reed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.[35] Others suspect a movement in the U.S. Dollar to Japanese yen exchange rate.[36]

Hey, thanks so much for the reply, Gord. I appreciate it. Yes, I’ve built one property and it’s a top vacation rental in its area. I’ll just have to be smart with the next one, and with looming fears of a recession (whether or not it happens) and stock market volitility, sellers appear to be spooked and dropped the price, so I’ll be able to buy the property for less. Timing might be good.
The macros continue to be a worry for the markets. The trade deficit is consistent at around $18 billion per month and CAD is likely to get closer to 3% of GDP by year end. Oil prices are close to $80/bbl while the INR has already cracked close to 73/$. All these factors may force the RBI to hike the repo rates by 25 basis points to 50 basis points which is likely to be a negative factor for the stock markets. That risk also got factored into the markets on Friday. In a nutshell, with all the macro uncertainties, most traders were trying to go into the week end as light as possible.

Having said that, it does seem like Buffett himself is paying attention and agrees that the market is generally expensive. After all, the lack of attractive investment opportunities has resulted in Berkshire Hathaway accumulating nearly $110 billion of cash and equivalents on its balance sheet. Plus, Buffett has specifically cited valuation when discussing the absence of major acquisitions lately.
Did you ever stop to think about how goods and services can’t teleport? We don’t have teleportation technology – or magic, for that matter. So when a president/congress decides to move the economy, it takes *time* for the economy to react. Policies take time to come in force, markets take time to guage impacts and respond accordingly, equilibrium is established only after a long series of interractions. It takes *years* not days or weeks. You don’t judge a president (or congress) by what happens immediately after they take office (read: the economic meltdown during Obama’s first term, or the economic uptick during Trump’s first few months). You look at what happens two years into their term of office, with acknowledgement of the context.
Unemployment is near record lows. Corporations are bringing money from offshore accounts back into the U.S. Technology is driving thousands of new innovations. Of course, none of these conditions for prosperity will last forever, and there's certainly pockets of the U.S. still experiencing job loss and poverty. I loath being a cheerleader for stocks or the economy, but it's not as bad as it seems.
It’s not over.  The worst October stock market crash since 2008 got even worse on Friday.  The Dow was down another 296 points, the S&P 500 briefly dipped into correction territory, and it was another bloodbath for tech stocks.  On Wednesday, I warned that there would be a bounce, and we saw that happen on Thursday.  But the bounce didn’t extend into Friday.  Instead, we witnessed another wave of panic selling, and that has many investors extremely concerned about what will happen next week.  Overall, global stocks have now fallen for five weeks in a row, and during that time more than 8 trillion dollars in global wealth has been wiped out.  That is the fastest plunge in global stock market wealth since the collapse of Lehman Brothers, and it is yet another confirmation that a major turning point has arrived.

The portfolio I am testing in this study purchases 2-month 0.5 delta puts on the S&P 500 Composite Index (approximately 30 percent out of the money, in the case of a 40 percent implied volatility) at the start of each strategy period at an assumed 40 percent volatility level…. After every month, the 2-month put options position is rolled (the existing options are sold and new 2-month puts are purchased, which resets the position every month)… Each month the portfolio spends one half of one percent on puts, and the remaining 99.5 percent stays invested in the S&P index.
I have good reasons why i prep. I just dont have any confidence in govenment and am no convinved that covernment and city officials, etites etc are busy sitting around worry thier entitles asses off worry about me not eating or having a hard time. Or i am being too paranoid. Agency ass clowns think that you all are so dumb to relax and so that they can steer thinking by convine shtf-effers that i have bad grammar and can’t spell.
“Investing is the attempt to make a financial killing, in other words, bigger profits and less work. Why else would anyone with their head on straignt want to make a profit on the backs of others? Thousands of years ago it was determined by one nation that debts should be forgiven every 7 years. Lending money with large interest rates was unfair. It’s in Egyptian and Abrahamic history.”
Some academics view the Wall Street Crash of 1929 as part of a historical process that was a part of the new theories of boom and bust. According to economists such as Joseph Schumpeter, Nikolai Kondratiev and Charles E. Mitchell, the crash was merely a historical event in the continuing process known as economic cycles. The impact of the crash was merely to increase the speed at which the cycle proceeded to its next level.

The domestic equity markets started on a positive note on Friday following lower crude oil prices, a sharp recovery in Indian rupee value vs US dollar with Yes Bank shares plunging 34%. Yes Bank shares collapsed as much as 34% in the morning deals after India’s fifth-largest private sector lender informed that Rana Kapoor, MD & CEO, Yes Bank may continue as the MD & CEO till 31 January 2019. The benchmark Sensex rallied as much as 368.02 points to a day’s high of 37,489.24 while NSE Nifty recoiled to a day’s top of 11,346.80.
In the second half of 1982 the number of cartridges grew from 100 in June to more than 400 in December. Experts predicted a glut in 1983, with 10% of games producing 75% of sales.[23] BYTE stated in December that "in 1982 few games broke new ground in either design or format ... If the public really likes an idea, it is milked for all it's worth, and numerous clones of a different color soon crowd the shelves. That is, until the public stops buying or something better comes along. Companies who believe that microcomputer games are the hula hoop of the 1980s only want to play Quick Profit."[28] Bill Kunkel said in January 1983 that companies had "licensed everything that moves, walks, crawls, or tunnels beneath the earth. You have to wonder how tenuous the connection will be between the game and the movie Marathon Man. What are you going to do, present a video game root canal?"[29]
The next day, "Black Tuesday", October 29, 1929, about 16 million shares traded as the panic selling reached its peak. Some stocks actually had no buyers at any price that day ("air pockets"[citation needed]). The Dow lost an additional 30 points, or 12 percent.[11][12][13][14] The volume of stocks traded on October 29, 1929, was a record that was not broken for nearly 40 years.[12]
"I think we're going to work through this continued intersection of domestic and international political risk, with the fact the economy is very good and the earnings projection is very good, and the valuations are creeping up, but they're by no means excessive, with interest rates at this level," said Julian Emanuel, chief equity and derivatives strategist at BTIG. "But our view has been all along that basically you've got to fix the relationship with China in order to really make material further upside progress."

Solid advice, but investors should broaden their horizons to encompass digital currency, as the fallacy of global fiat currency is insane in the social media world we live in today.  Trust in the government is eroding, as is the reporting needed to only use a dollar denominated unit of measure in a world where block chain and liquid, easy to use Bitcoins are in your digital wallet and you can buy anything from an airline ticket to a car on auction on eBay.
I’m ready, but nervous. IF, this is the big one, and you are wanting this or think you will pop some corn and enjoy the show, then you are unaware of the big picture. Yes it may be enjoyable for a while (I get no joy from this BTW), it WILL effect you in ways you haven’t yet thought of. Yes those of us that are prepared will weather it better than those not prepared, but this isn’t going to be fun in the long run.
John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Sean Williams has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Netflix. The Motley Fool has the following options: long January 2020 $150 calls on Apple and short January 2020 $155 calls on Apple. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.
One of the reasons Warren Buffett’s predictions tend to have more weight is that they’re less based on outright fortune telling and more on a series of clear indicators. In other words, the Warren Buffett Indicator works like a barometer. It does not predict rain, per se, but it does tell you whether you should look for an umbrella in the closet to keep it handy for the next day.

You are obviously a banker of some sort. The bankers and the bank owners are fucking greedy bastards. PERIOD. Look at the situation. They make billions but cant provide benefits. It is the obligation of owners and investors to provide for workers. Its is supposed to work that way. But they and you KEEP it all and give the people swill. You al suck and have been compared to serial killers on a psychological level.. Stop defending the indefensible! you bought the bailout in 08 and the took bonuses for causing it. You put people and kids in th street then went sailing. So fuck you and your bastard cronies!!!!!
August has been a study in contrasts, another month in which calm persisted in the U.S. despite jarring news flow. Daily volume dropped to an average of 6.1 billion shares, the second lowest since last October. Negative headlines flashed, from an escalation in trade tensions to emerging market turmoil to continued political chaos in Washington. Yet none was enough to rock the market out of its slumber.
Bond strategists have been warning that the second half of September could bring a slight jump in yields because pension funds have been loading up on Treasurys and other bonds before the Sept. 15 deadline for a change in tax laws for corporate sponsors of funds. They believe that buying has depressed yields, which move opposite prices, and the end of those purchases could send yields higher.
The Roaring Twenties, the decade that followed World War I that led to the crash,[3] was a time of wealth and excess. Building on post-war optimism, rural Americans migrated to the cities in vast numbers throughout the decade with the hopes of finding a more prosperous life in the ever-growing expansion of America's industrial sector.[4] While the American cities prospered, the overproduction of agricultural produce created widespread financial despair among American farmers throughout the decade.[4] This would later be blamed as one of the key factors that led to the 1929 stock market crash.[5]
The crash followed an asset bubble. Since 1922, the stock market had gone up by almost 20 percent a year. Everyone invested, thanks to a financial invention called buying "on margin." It allowed people to borrow money from their broker to buy stocks. They only needed to put down 10-20 percent. Investing this way contributed to the irrational exuberance of the Roaring Twenties.

Umm sorry, but you know nothing relevant about the 2007-08 financial collapse and should do some research before claiming you know anything about financial theory. I agree with you that some interest is fine and fair, but Calvin is quite correct that in this case is was simple greed, gambling and dishonest on the part of your “bankers” that’s to blame. The subprime mortgage risk is not what caused the collapse in 2007-2008. What happened here is that you “bankers” even though they knew that interest rates were only in the 6% percent range, and thus grouping the mortgages together and selling them as investment could only net a profit in that same range (6%) instead claimed that they were worth 10-100 times what they were and sold them as such. Normal (not subprime mortgages) were regulated by law so that your cheating bankers(to be fair this was not all bankers, only dishonest ones) were not allowed to claim that they are worth anything more than the rate of return which is obviously the truthful and correct rate maximum that an investor would see. Sub-prime mortgages the other hand, were not regulated by law and nothing prevented your “bankers” falsely claiming and selling the mortgates as an investement with an expected derivative return many times higher than could ever be possible with the real interest rates.
During the 1920s, the U.S. stock market underwent rapid expansion, reaching its peak in August 1929, after a period of wild speculation. By then, production had already declined and unemployment had risen, leaving stocks in great excess of their real value. Among the other causes of the eventual market collapse were low wages, the proliferation of debt, a struggling agricultural sector and an excess of large bank loans that could not be liquidated.
Last week when we were closing on our house- we were selling-, we were told there was a delay earlier in the day. All house sales and money transactions go through the federal reserve. Luckily it came back up, we sold and “pocketed” our gains in the bank. Now what to do with it!!! I am not sure it is safe in the bank, talking $260,000. We want to move to middle, southern Tn. Living in an apartment till my daughter graduates. Any ideas?
So aim to build a war chest for a future market meltdown by accumulating cash. It's probably best not to overdo it, though, because the market may not crash for another few years, in which time all the cash you've amassed will not have been growing for you in stocks. You might just accumulate enough cash to establish meaningful positions in a few stocks. In general, it can be good to have no more than 10% of your overall net worth in cash for investments.
That's a short term shock which makes a lot of people catch their breath. When a country as big as China has a short term shock (even in stocks), a lot of people in other countries get nervous. It's not just stocks, either; the price of oil has dropped dramatically in recent months—good for a lot of people who consume oil (airlines, transportation, individuals), but bad for people who produce oil (oil-rich countries, petrochemical refineries).
Lana, a lot of people are talking housing crash in many markets, but that could take the whole economy down. Even with a crash, it would still be tough for buyers. The right approach to bring prices down is more housing supply. The governments should provide tax breaks and other incentives for housing development and legislation which promotes new housing projects. Good finding a place you can afford.
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