Homeowners are not taking as much equity out of their homes. Home equity rose to $85 billion in 2006. It collapsed to less than $10 billion in 2010. It remained there until 2015. By 2017, it had only risen to $14 billion. Obamacare is one reason for that. Bankruptcy filings have fallen 50 percent since the ACA was passed. In 2010, 1.5 million people filed. In 2016, only 770,846 did. 

From October 6–10 the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) closed lower in all five sessions. Volume levels were record-breaking. The DJIA fell over 1,874 points, or 18%, in its worst weekly decline ever on both a points and percentage basis. The S&P 500 fell more than 20%.[36] The week also set 3 top ten NYSE Group Volume Records with October 8 at #5, October 9 at #10, and October 10 at #1.[37]
You are obviously a banker of some sort. The bankers and the bank owners are fucking greedy bastards. PERIOD. Look at the situation. They make billions but cant provide benefits. It is the obligation of owners and investors to provide for workers. Its is supposed to work that way. But they and you KEEP it all and give the people swill. You al suck and have been compared to serial killers on a psychological level.. Stop defending the indefensible! you bought the bailout in 08 and the took bonuses for causing it. You put people and kids in th street then went sailing. So fuck you and your bastard cronies!!!!!
"I've been in retailing 30 years and I have never seen any category of goods get on a self-destruct pattern like this", a Service Merchandise executive told The New York Times in June 1983.[12] The price war was so severe that in September Coleco CEO Arnold Greenberg welcomed rumors of an IBM 'Peanut' home computer because "IBM is a company that knows how to make money". "I look back a year or two in the videogame field, or the home-computer field", Greenberg added, "how much better everyone was, when most people were making money, rather than very few".[15] Companies reduced production in the middle of the year because of weak demand even as prices remained low, causing shortages as sales suddenly rose during the Christmas season;[16] only the Commodore 64 was widely available, with an estimated more than 500,000 computers sold during Christmas.[17] The 99/4A was such a disaster for TI, that the company's stock immediately rose by 25% after the company discontinued it and exited the home-computer market in late 1983.[18] JC Penney announced in December 1983 that it would soon no longer sell home computers, because of the combination of low supply and low prices.[19]

The rising share prices encouraged more people to invest, hoping the share prices would rise further. Speculation thus fueled further rises and created an economic bubble. Because of margin buying, investors stood to lose large sums of money if the market turned down—or even failed to advance quickly enough. The average P/E (price to earnings) ratio of S&P Composite stocks was 32.6 in September 1929,[22] clearly above historical norms.[23] According to economist John Kenneth Galbraith, this exuberance also resulted in a large number of people placing their savings and money in leverage investment products like Goldman Sachs' "Blue Ridge trust" and "Shenandoah trust". These too crashed in 1929, resulting in losses to banks of $475 billion 2010 dollars ($533.06 billion in 2017).[24]
While some areas such as the 905 have seen big drops, (houses are sitting and have to be rented now) areas in Toronto have maintained prices.  These neighbourhoods offer a more reliable bet for sustainable property investment value. Many property investors have discovered the hard way, what the word sustainable means in bottom line dollar terms. Because of demand, two hot areas right now are rental property investment and student housing investment.
It is just another business cycle, albeit an extended one, coming to an end: not TEOTWAWKI. Therefore it is safe to say that the downturn will be extended too because foreclosures (as an example) have not been assimilated from the last crash yet; and a new round of bankruptcies and foreclosures will follow the economic decline for those who are levered.
The affordability index continues to be stacked against potential home buyers. As housing and rental prices steadily increase, wages continue to stay relatively stagnant. Historically, the average income-to-housing cost ratio in the U.S. has hovered near 30 percent, but in some metro areas, that number is currently closer to 40 and even 50 percent! This strips away the opportunity to save money as a significant portion of a person’s monthly income is going to keeping a roof over their head.
TREB forecasted another strong year for home sales via the MLS®.  Their outlook for the Toronto region was 100,000+ home sales for the third consecutive year. Between 104,500 and 115,500 home sales are expected in 2017, with a point forecast of 110,000. TREB’s districts include Mississauga, Oakville, Vaughan, Newmarket, Aurora, Richmond Hill, Markham Bradford, Scarborough, Brampton, Oshawa and Milton.

A sudden sell-off was seen in most of the NBFCs (Non-Banking Finance Companies) with DHFL plummetting as much as 45%. In the Nifty Financial Services index, 14 of 20 stocks fell into negative territory with Indiabulls Housing Finance losing more than 11% followed by Shriram Transport Finance (down 6%), Edelweiss Financial Services (down 4%), Bajaj Finserv & Bajaj Finance, down 4%, M&M Financial Services down 4%. 

Hi Skylar, I can’t offer advice unfortunately. Availability in Northern Virginia is very constrained, so the question is whether new homes are being built. People aren’t selling their homes, listings down 4%, and the economy is strong. It’s risky which is why governments are amending financing rules. Did you consider buying a property with a rental income unit?
Despite the measures to ensure stability in the cryptocurrency market, it's still a struggle to stop or at least reduce cryptocurrencies' volatility. There are still so many factors keeping them volatile. These include: the currencies' lack of intrinsic value, the lack of institutional capital, the implementation of regulations and thin-order books, among other factors.
Share Market Live: Indian stock markets (Sensex and Nifty) closed lower on Friday facing a knee-jerk reaction in the intraday deals with Sensex closing 280 points lower and Nifty slipping below 11,150. During the day, a market-wide sell-off was seen in stocks with the benchmark Sensex plummetting 1,128 points and Nifty tripping below 10,900. Shares of Yes Bank, collapsed 34% intraday, settled down 29% while DHFL shares ended down 42% after nosediving 60% intraday.
The Chief Economist of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and several academic economists published a working paper containing a review and empirical analysis of trade data from the Flash Crash.[60] The authors examined the characteristics and activities of buyers and sellers in the Flash Crash and determined that a large seller, a mutual fund firm, exhausted available fundamental buyers and then triggered a cascade of selling by intermediaries, particularly high-frequency trading firms. Like the SEC/CFTC report described earlier, the authors call this cascade of selling "hot potato trading",[51] as high-frequency firms rapidly acquired and then liquidated positions among themselves at steadily declining prices.
Despite fears of a repeat of the 1930s Depression, the market rallied immediately after the crash, posting a record one-day gain of 102.27 the very next day and 186.64 points on Thursday October 22. It took only two years for the Dow to recover completely; by September 1989, the market had regained all of the value it had lost in the 1987 crash. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained six-tenths of a percent during the calendar year 1987.

The Fed didn't realize a collapse was brewing until March 2007. It realized that hedge fund housing losses could threaten the economy. Throughout the summer, banks became unwilling to lend to each other. They were afraid that they would receive bad MBS in return. Bankers didn't know how much bad debt they had on their books. No one wanted to admit it. If they did, then their credit rating would be lowered. Then, their stock price would fall, and they would be unable to raise more funds to stay in business.
These Tranche’s were nothing more than whipped cream on chit. Standard & Poors along with Moody knew all too well these loans weren’t as secure as advertised. At the risk of shareholder devaluation they were both falsely applying ratings to all of them. That’s called greed. CDO’S – synthetic CDO’S all in bad. I read it few times and know there are many reputable banks out there. The facts are however, they created and implemented what they could get away with. When the gun fired there was plenty of blame to go around. Now regulation has taken solid control of this and hopefully we will never experience this kind of meltdown again.

Intraday Data provided by SIX Financial Information and subject to terms of use. Historical and current end-of-day data provided by SIX Financial Information. All quotes are in local exchange time. Real-time last sale data for U.S. stock quotes reflect trades reported through Nasdaq only. Intraday data delayed at least 15 minutes or per exchange requirements.

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