Thank you, Gord, for the insightful article. We bought our SoCal (South Bay) home two years ago and our neighborhood’s prices have soared since. We are currently looking at a potential profit of more than $350k given recent comps.. Definitely not a bad thing, but it’s creating a dilemma in our home since my husband is all about cashing out while the market is hot and renting until prices go down again. I on the other hand, am more in favor of doubling down on our home and area by converting our garage to a liveable (and rentable) unit. We really like our area and home, but the potential profit is incredibly enticing. What do you think would be the smartest move in this circumstance?
What on earth could be responsible for such optimism? After all, the oft-repeated adage that Trump’s tax cuts have been feeding the bulls on Wall Street has run its course. The tax cuts have not been approved and with the divide in Congress—a divide also within Republicans themselves—there’s little chance of the major reductions occurring. Moreover, the U.S. debt now exceeds $20.0 trillion.
Is funny, the tropical depression is well away from us but we are getting an extremely wet weather system over the state, they call it an anti-cyclone, whatever that is, all i know is i could use some sunshine, been raining for weeks, only one or two days here and there that didnt rain. Too damn wet, crops rotting in the field, at least the market crops, oh well, such is life as a farmer!
I am not an expert on what a president should do and most can be picked apart pretty readily by experts. But it would seem that the current trajectory of the Republicans under Trump is not one of reducing our deficit. Yes they want to scale back a great deal of spending. The problem is they want to dump a lot of that savings back into a bloated military budget and on top of that are considering drastic tax cuts. No analysis thus far has been at all optimistic about any potential increase in growth outrunning the addition this will make to our debt over the long term. So if that number is a concern neither party has shown a willingness to fix it.

Terming the crash as a good opportunity to buy these stocks, Madhu Kela of Reliance Capital told ET Now,”Looks like a technical sell-off Their short-term liquidity is very very good; enough liquidity to match liability. Speculative unwinding Long term investor, if you understand the company and faith in management, excellent opportunity to buy these companies; if you think the management is good and will come out stronger, then it’s a good opportunity to buy the shares. Stock markets to worry about the liquidity of companies which have high credit ratings with good liquidity is purely speculative. Even if the interest rates are going up, the lending rates will also go up; to think that either the news is good, or the price is good.”
Mass censorship of conservatives and libertarians is exploding. You’ve already seen this with the demonetization and ultimate purge of Infowars and other alternative media outlets by mega-corporations working in tangent to stifle competition. But you are important in this fight. Your voice is important. Your free thought is important. Make no mistake, you are just as important as anyone in the Anti-American establishment.

At the time of the Flash Crash, in May 2010, high-frequency traders were taking advantage of unintended consequences of the consolidation of the U.S. financial regulations into Regulation NMS,[3][13] designed to modernize and strengthen the United States National Market System for equity securities.[14]:641 The Reg NMS, promulgated and described by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, was intended to assure that investors received the best price executions for their orders by encouraging competition in the marketplace, created attractive new opportunities for high-frequency-traders. Activities such as spoofing, layering and front-running were banned by 2015.[citation needed] This rule was designed to give investors the best possible price when dealing in stocks, even if that price was not on the exchange that received the order.[15]:171
You haven’t seen the effects of *any* of Trumps decisions yet. And Obama’s decisions had virtually zero impact on creating the Great Recession. There wasn’t time. Unless you believe in teleportation, magic, and instantaneous changes to the marketplace and if that’s the case, I’m a nigerian prince building a bridge and boy have I got a business proposition for you…
The New York Times then noted, "Automatic computerized traders on the stock market shut down as they detected the sharp rise in buying and selling".[25] As computerized high-frequency traders exited the stock market, the resulting lack of liquidity "caused shares of some prominent companies like Procter & Gamble and Accenture to trade down as low as a penny or as high as $100,000".[25] These extreme prices also resulted from "market internalizers",[44][45][46] firms that usually trade with customer orders from their own inventory instead of sending those orders to exchanges, "routing 'most, if not all,' retail orders to the public markets—a flood of unusual selling pressure that sucked up more dwindling liquidity".[26]
This was an attempt to hedge a 20% decline in $100,000 of equities so it performed pretty well in our hypothetical crash, protecting against nearly the entire loss. And you could also work backwards, as Spitznagel suggests in the second strategy described above, using this calculator. This way, you might say I want to protect against a $20,000 loss so I need to buy 61 put options ($20,000 divided by $328.10) rather than just the 55 we bought using the first strategy.

Share Market Live: Indian stock markets (Sensex and Nifty) closed lower on Friday facing a knee-jerk reaction in the intraday deals with Sensex closing 280 points lower and Nifty slipping below 11,150. During the day, a market-wide sell-off was seen in stocks with the benchmark Sensex plummetting 1,128 points and Nifty tripping below 10,900. Shares of Yes Bank, collapsed 34% intraday, settled down 29% while DHFL shares ended down 42% after nosediving 60% intraday.


Filia pointed to the increasing frequency of value-at-risk shocks, or swift market corrections, as an indication of fragility for global markets. The report cited as evidence the VIX volatility index spike in February, the Turkish lira's dramatic drop in recent months, and Italy's roller-coaster bond price moves, among other examples, as early warning signals for "system instability of the broader financial network."
“My sense is that the bottom that we were unable to find, chances are that we have found it. Often things tend to panic and sell of, unless it’s a black swan event My sense is that whatever information is there is not so serious; may be a couple of stocks may remain dicey but overall if there is no systemic risk, what we are doing is we are buying back nifty now; because it’s not like the whole world is coming to an end May be there is a problem; it can be contained; but once the news is out that news is irrelevant. Given that we are now near the 200-DMA, we could now have that sustainable rally. There is no value in worrying about what’s gone wrong. Try to buy because prices tend to factor in most things. My sense is that by the close we should recover some more Buy the good quality NBFCs, such as Bajaj Finance, L&T finance I would be a buyer now that the fall is already over,” investment advisor Ashwini Gujral told CNBC TV18.
To be able to make good decisions amid a stock market crash, investors will need to be able to remain calm. As Buffett has said, "Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with the 130 IQ. Once you have ordinary intelligence, what you need is the temperament to control the urges that get other people into trouble in investing."
During the 1920s, the U.S. stock market underwent rapid expansion, reaching its peak in August 1929, after a period of wild speculation. By then, production had already declined and unemployment had risen, leaving stocks in great excess of their real value. Among the other causes of the eventual market collapse were low wages, the proliferation of debt, a struggling agricultural sector and an excess of large bank loans that could not be liquidated.
During the 1920s, the U.S. stock market underwent rapid expansion, reaching its peak in August 1929, after a period of wild speculation. By then, production had already declined and unemployment had risen, leaving stocks in great excess of their real value. Among the other causes of the eventual market collapse were low wages, the proliferation of debt, a struggling agricultural sector and an excess of large bank loans that could not be liquidated.
Since the Great Recession, the financial system of the country has somewhat matured, thanks to the introduction of tight regulations including Dodd Frank and Basel III with the sole agenda of preventing bundling of mortgages, and in turn another crisis. While there still are plenty of risky loans today, these are not big enough to cause an economic meltdown.
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