Thus, Buffett has not said anything specific to the effect of “the stock market will crash in 2018.” He doesn’t have to make any such statement. An expert prediction is just that: a prediction. The smarter the expert, the less tendency there is to trust forecasts and prophecies. But if you use the expert prediction as a guide to understand what’s happening, you can detect trends. Thus, you can prepare and take appropriate actions that will not leave you stranded. If the negative predictions do materialize, you can take comfort in the fact you were ready. If they don’t, you can enjoy the favorable outcome with everyone else.
I am very frightened. This past June, I allowed a financial advisor to convince me that my portfolio made up of primarily stocks was risky for a retiree. I have been retired since 2005 and had held the same stocks since then. These stocks included 2 Canadian banks, BCE, TransAlta, and Emera. I was receiving dividends o $4,800 per year and all the stocks consistently raised their dividends. The financial advisor put me in2 costly mutual funds which proceeded to lose me $ 1800 within days and also swallowed up up my incoming dividends from the former portfolio. By the time I was down $6,000 I panicked and pulled out of the mutual funds. And! This was in 2017. What I have left and what I thought would carry me through my retirement is now in a money market making very little and I am terrified daily as to reinvesting it.
The average price of a detached house in the GTA rose to $1,019,416 from $1,008,361 last month. YoY, detached home prices have fallen 1.4% in the 416 area code and .4% in the 905 area code.  Home prices in the 416 area code fell from $1,342,363 to $1,311,265 , a drop of $31,000. The price of a condo apartment in the 416 area code fell from $615,582 to $603,153 yet that average price 8.6% higher than last October.
Mati Greenspan, an analyst with the trading platform eToro, told Business Insider on Tuesday that volumes from Japan and South Korea had been tailing off in recent days. Traders in these markets are usually buyers, and a large-scale exit could have created an imbalance in the market, with more sellers than buyers driving down prices and sparking a panic.
By the end of October, stock markets had fallen in Hong Kong (45.5%), Australia (41.8%), Spain (31%), the United Kingdom (26.45%), the United States (22.68%) and Canada (22.5%). New Zealand's market was hit especially hard, falling about 60% from its 1987 peak, and would take several years to recover.[5][6] The damage to the New Zealand economy was compounded by high exchange rates and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand's refusal to loosen monetary policy in response to the crisis, in contrast to countries such as West Germany, Japan and the United States, whose banks increased short-term liquidity to forestall recession and would experience economic growth in the following 2–3 years.[7]
The release of so many new games in 1982 flooded the market. Most stores had insufficient space to carry new games and consoles. As stores tried to return the surplus games to the new publishers, the publishers had neither new products nor cash to issue refunds to the retailers. Many publishers, including Games by Apollo and US Games, quickly folded.[citation needed] Unable to return the unsold games to defunct publishers, stores marked down the titles and placed them in discount bins and sale tables. Recently released games which initially sold for US $35 (equivalent to $92 in 2018) were in bins for $5 ($13 in 2018).[30][31] Crane said that "those awful games flooded the market at huge discounts, and ruined the video game business".[27] By June 1983, the market for the more expensive games had shrunk dramatically and was replaced by a new market of rushed-to-market, low-budget games.
After nearly a decade of historically low interest rates and slow economic growth, the U.S. economy is picking up speed, bolstered by President Donald Trump's policies, such as tax cuts and less regulation of businesses. The economy grew 4.2 percent in the second quarter, its fastest pace in four years. And the job market is robust, with the September unemployment rate of 3.7 percent the lowest in nearly 50 years.
John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Sean Williams has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Netflix. The Motley Fool has the following options: long January 2020 $150 calls on Apple and short January 2020 $155 calls on Apple. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.
The trouble is that further escalation is still on the cards. Both sides are still well apart on the key issues (like IP protection) and President Trump remains defiant saying “it’s time to take a stand on China” and his threat to increase tariffs on all imports from China remains. Chinese growth is far from collapsing and China is using policy stimulus to offset the economic impact of the tariffs, so is in no hurry to respond to pressure from Trump. Our view remains that a negotiated solution is likely, but it’s unlikely to come until later this year or early next.
Many factors likely contributed to the collapse of the stock market. Among the more prominent causes were the period of rampant speculation (those who had bought stocks on margin not only lost the value of their investment, they also owed money to the entities that had granted the loans for the stock purchases), tightening of credit by the Federal Reserve (in August 1929 the discount rate was raised from 5 percent to 6 percent), the proliferation of holding companies and investment trusts (which tended to create debt), a multitude of large bank loans that could not be liquidated, and an economic recession that had begun earlier in the summer.
If you really believe the market is headed for an imminent crash, there are all sorts of places you could invest your money. You could move it all into cash, you could buy gold or real estate or for that matter you could even take an aggressive approach and try to capitalize on stocks' carnage by loading up on investments designed to rise when the market falls, such as bear market funds or put options.
It is impossible to know for sure what the housing market will do. It will eventually go down, as it cannot go up forever, but the question is when will that happen and by how much? I feel that this market is driven by solid demand, solid lending guidelines. Couple that with low inventory and we will continue to see prices increase. If the builders start building like crazy, I would start to worry about another decline.
Of course, sometimes something happens. On June 23, 2016, voters in the United Kingdom voted for their country to leave the European Union. Membership in the EU means improved trade policies, less friction around goods and services and people moving across borders, and (despite the economic kerfuffle around different economic strengths and weaknesses between member countries) a general sharing of wealth from multiple countries all working more or less together.
However, the psychological effects of the crash reverberated across the nation as businesses became aware of the difficulties in securing capital market investments for new projects and expansions. Business uncertainty naturally affects job security for employees, and as the American worker (the consumer) faced uncertainty with regards to income, naturally the propensity to consume declined. The decline in stock prices caused bankruptcies and severe macroeconomic difficulties, including contraction of credit, business closures, firing of workers, bank failures, decline of the money supply, and other economically depressing events.
To be clear, this isn't an exhaustive list of things that could potentially cause a stock market crash. And it's likely that more than one of these factors could combine to cause a crash. The 2008 crash, for one, was primarily caused by excessive speculation that caused a bubble in real estate prices, along with excessive leverage taken on by both consumers and financial institutions, as well as investor panic after banks started to fail.
Note:  The statements and information presented in this post is not intended as professional investment advice. It is solely an exploration of stock investing and the risks, perils, and behavior of stock markets and the economy. No one should rely on a single source of information or a single stock market and investing professional’s advice.  The overall message of the post might be to diversify stock, real estate, and cash/gold holdings as a hedge against stock market crashes.  Investors should look into hedging strategies but be aware that even hedging may provide limited protection from a crash.

Its pretty obvious she's completely failed. She may as well have said she never wrote the current Brexit deal, Barnier did or Merkel did. In more enlightened times her head would be on a spike by now, down by the Thames. But what do we expect from just the latest traitor to Sovereignty on the list, that includes: Heath, Major, Brown and the rest . . We need a new broom to sweep all this rubbish away, once and for all . .
Shares of tech companies, including the so-called FAANG stocks – Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google-parent Alphabet – have been market darlings for years. So when a sell-off gains steam, the stocks with the biggest gains are among the ones that investors sell first to lock in profits. Tech stocks have also been caught in the trade fight with China, as Trump's tough stance on Beijing is causing disruptions in their supply chain. Technology companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Alphabet are also facing intense regulatory scrutiny from the U.S. government.
This sluggish growth and a near 30% plunge in Shanghai shares prompted swift action from the Chinese government, which announced plans to cut personal income taxes and cut the Reserve Requirement Ratio for the fourth time to encourage more leverage on top of the debt-disabled economy. The government has even bought ETF’s to prop of the sinking Chinese stock market. As a result, shares recently surged 4% in one day. However, more than half of those gains were quickly reversed the following day as investors took a sober look at whether the Chinese government is starting to lose its grip on the economy. 
Moreover, the leverage in many emerging markets and some advanced economies is clearly excessive. Commercial and residential real estate is far too expensive in many parts of the world. The emerging-market correction in equities, commodities, and fixed-income holdings will continue as global storm clouds gather. And as forward-looking investors start anticipating a growth slowdown in 2020, markets will reprice risky assets by 2019.
Of course, that's an average and the market's return is seldom steady and predictable. Yet, it's important to remember that these attractive returns include many periods when the markets have lost a quarter or half their value, or worse. As a result, even if you know a crash is coming at some point, which it very likely is at some point in the coming years, then it's not a reason to avoid stocks. Provided you can stick with it you'll likely see decent returns from diversified global stocks even including the catastrophic crashes that scare you.
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