The panic began again on Black Monday (October 28), with the market closing down 12.8 percent. On Black Tuesday (October 29) more than 16 million shares were traded. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost another 12 percent and closed at 198—a drop of 183 points in less than two months. Prime securities tumbled like the issues of bogus gold mines. General Electric fell from 396 on September 3 to 210 on October 29. American Telephone and Telegraph dropped 100 points. DuPont fell from a summer high of 217 to 80, United States Steel from 261 to 166, Delaware and Hudson from 224 to 141, and Radio Corporation of America (RCA) common stock from 505 to 26. Political and financial leaders at first affected to treat the matter as a mere spasm in the market, vying with one another in reassuring statements. President Hoover and Treasury Secretary Andrew W. Mellon led the way with optimistic predictions that business was “fundamentally sound” and that a great revival of prosperity was “just around the corner.” Although the Dow Jones Industrial Average nearly reached the 300 mark again in 1930, it sank rapidly in May 1930. Another 20 years would pass before the Dow average regained enough momentum to surpass the 200-point level.
The Indian rupee strengthened further against US dollar in the early afternoon deals on Friday following the sustained weakness in the crude oil prices. The domestic currency (rupee) extended morning gains on Friday and hit a fresh 2-week high at 71.7663, up 62 paise per unit US dollar, the Bloomberg data showed. The rupee is trading 120 paise higher from the all-time low of 72.97 apiece US dollar. Earlier on Tuesday this week, the rupee went very close to hitting 73/$ and made a record low at 72.9675 against US dollar. 
“One of the lessons that we all learned over and over again is try to cut through the noise and get to the fundamental driver of the stock market,” said Rich Weiss, chief investment officer and senior portfolio manager of multi-asset strategies at American Century Investments. “And the major driver has been, is, and will continue to be the strength of our economy.”

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Marc, I hope you and your kids can stay in So Cal, but can you see how the money and people are being vilified for wanting to be part of California’s successful economy and lifestyle. The real villains are those who are preventing development. And that new development really drives the economy, thus giving California a chance to compete in the global age. Other cities in Canada and the UK have the same problem and in each case it’s politicians squeezing supply. And the actions they’re taking does point to a recession eventually. If California’s polticians remove constraints, you’ll have lower prices in San Diego, LA and the SF Bay Area. The market alway solves itself.

Each of these consoles had its own library of games produced by the console maker, and many had large libraries of games produced by third-party developers. In 1982, analysts noticed trends of saturation, mentioning that the amount of new software coming in will only allow a few big hits, that retailers had too much floor space for systems, along with price drops for home computers could result in an industry shakeup.[3]
If you make 6% after taxes and fees on your investments, then you’re ahead by 3.5%, or $20k/year after the transaction fees are taken off. In Vancouver, like the couple from the G&M article, you’re ahead by more not only in percentage terms due to a higher price-to-rent, but also because the amounts are higher ($1M houses rather than $650k), so you’re even further ahead in dollar terms ($45k per year).
Some point to the Ontario government’s Places to Grow intensification plan as the major culprit in skyrocketing single detached home prices. Toronto condo prices haven’t risen like house prices have, yet condo demand is usually not spoken much about. It does look like a growing population want house to live in. A growing millennial family would certainly find it tough to live in highrise condos designed for adult living.
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Take your money out of the bank ASAP.  If you still keep your money in the bank, go there and remove as much as you can while leaving in enough to pay your bills. Although it wasn’t a market collapse in Greece recently, the banks did close and limit ATM withdrawals.  People went for quite some time without being able to access their money, but were able to have a sense of normalcy by transferring money online to pay bills or using their debit cards to make purchases.  Get your cash out. You don’t want to be at the mercy of the banks.
A stock market bubble inflates and explodes when investors, acting in a herd mentality, tend to buy stocks en masse, leading to inflated and unrealistically high market prices. In describing market bubbles, former U.S. Reserve Chair Alan Greenspan referred to investors' "irrational exuberance" on the stock market in 1996, although his prophecy didn't really ring true, as the stock market continued to grow before entering into bear market territory in 2000. A stock market bubble's "pop" is often a signal that the stock market is experiencing a crash over the short-term, and is shifting from bull-to-bear-market mode over the long-term.
Obviously, if the market crashes, it's a good time to go shopping for bargains. The stocks tied to lots of wonderful businesses are likely to be depressed -- perhaps significantly so. But if you don't have some ready cash (or access to cash) to take advantage of that, you could be out of luck. Or you might find yourself selling out of some stocks at depressed prices (thus realizing losses or shrunken gains) in order to snap up shares of more compelling stocks. That's not ideal.
According to data from Equifax in August 2017, deep subprime auto loans -- i.e., loans with an origination VantageScore of 530 or less, on a scale of 300 to 850 -- have hit delinquency rates that hadn’t been seen since 2007. Interestingly enough, when examining the auto market as a whole, no red flags arise in terms of delinquency rates. But if you focus solely on subprime and deep subprime loans, they’ve been deteriorating of late. 
But it's during those times when you need to guard against overriding the rational process you went through to build your portfolio. If you want to re-evaluate the portfolio mix you arrived at earlier just to confirm that it's right for you and even possibly make a small tweak or two, fine. But you don't want to let fear and emotions dictate your investing strategy and lead you to make impulsive decisions you may rue later.
The number of major store chains shutting down or downsizing is remarkable. One of the latest to fall is Toys “R” Us. Some may find consolation in the fact that one of the reasons for the crumbling of traditional brick-and-mortar stores—but by no means the only one—has been Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:AMZN). But the day could come when even this giant is slain.
In years when there are midterm elections, CFRA says the returns have been erratic, and the S&P has averaged a 1 percent decline in September, going back to 1946. But it's often just temporarily bad news for the market, if history is a guide. In those midterm years, the market most often has rallied in the final quarter for an average gain of 7.5 percent.
Throughout 2017 and 2018, the Federal Reserve discussed a policy of raising interest rates, as they'd been at historically low levels for a historically unprecedented amount of time. Remember the correlation between interest rates for US Treasury securities and stock prices—the more you can make with safer investments (T-bills, bonds), the less attractive the risks of stocks are.
Prices began to decline in September and early October, but speculation continued, fueled in many cases by individuals who had borrowed money to buy shares—a practice that could be sustained only as long as stock prices continued rising. On October 18 the market went into a free fall, and the wild rush to buy stocks gave way to an equally wild rush to sell. The first day of real panic, October 24, is known as Black Thursday; on that day a record 12.9 million shares were traded as investors rushed to salvage their losses. Still, the Dow average closed down only six points after a number of major banks and investment companies bought up great blocks of stock in a successful effort to stem the panic that day. Their attempts, however, ultimately failed to shore up the market.
One of the reasons Warren Buffett’s predictions tend to have more weight is that they’re less based on outright fortune telling and more on a series of clear indicators. In other words, the Warren Buffett Indicator works like a barometer. It does not predict rain, per se, but it does tell you whether you should look for an umbrella in the closet to keep it handy for the next day.

I’m less concerned than our friends at the Fed. Businesses are rebelling in mass against Trump’s punitive tariffs on steel, aluminum, and lumber. Trump is still blind to his own economic idiocy as I write. Given the torrent of negative press on tariffs in recent weeks, I suspect that a member or two of his retinue will force him to see the light. They’ll force him sooner than later.
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