In putting this into practice today, let’s assume we have $100,000 invested in equities currently so we need to buy $500 in 2-month put options (0.5% of $100,000) that are 30% below the current underlying price. SPY trades at 219.4 as I write this so $154 is about 30% beneath this price. A small segment of the October 21 put options chain is below (from Yahoo!Finance). Looking at the ask prices and volume it looks like the 155 puts are a bit more liquid and better priced than the 154 puts. At $9 each (9c times 100 shares) we can buy 55 of the October 155 put options for $495.

The Indian rupee strengthened further against US dollar in the early afternoon deals on Friday following the sustained weakness in the crude oil prices. The domestic currency (rupee) extended morning gains on Friday and hit a fresh 2-week high at 71.7663, up 62 paise per unit US dollar, the Bloomberg data showed. The rupee is trading 120 paise higher from the all-time low of 72.97 apiece US dollar. Earlier on Tuesday this week, the rupee went very close to hitting 73/$ and made a record low at 72.9675 against US dollar. 
The crash began in Far Eastern markets the morning of October 19 and accelerated in London time, largely because London had closed early on October 16 due to the storm. By 9.30am, the London FTSE100 had fallen over 136 points. Later that morning, two U.S. warships shelled an Iranian oil platform in the Persian Gulf in response to Iran's Silkworm missile attack on the Sea Isle City.[3][4]
Buffett is being optimistic. In fact, if history can offer any lessons, note that the Dow Jones 100 years ago, in 1917, stood at 1,328 points. That would be less than 20 times the current number. But Buffett probably doesn’t have to worry too much about the events that may or may not occur in the 22nd century. Now, as far as the present is concerned, you can be sure that Buffett chooses his words and predictions more carefully, as it were.
"This is a kind of a panic sell-off occurs when the usually large amount of stop losses gets triggered as markets were not expecting such a drawdown in a single trading session," Mustafa Nadeem told FE Online. It was basically widespread to multiple companies, specifically, to NBFC space as there were concerns over credit risk coupled with that plunge in private banks, NBFC, and infrastructure housing finance companies, Nadeem said further. A lot of stop losses that were there in the market at much deeper levels of around 11,200 - 11,150, Mustafa Nadeem said. It was hardly 8-9 minutes of transactions that were much bigger that dragged the Benchmark index down. Though, on the flipside, There was buying seen at lower levels that pushed markets back above 11K level. Sensex was down almost a 1000 point within those few minutes, Mustafa Nadeem said. Technically this will change some technical setup in the medium term. If one would recall the same mode was seen in Early January this year. 

Nintendo reserved a large part of NES game revenue for itself by limiting most third-party publishers to only five games per year on its systems (some companies tried to get around this by creating additional company labels like Konami's Ultra Games label); Nintendo would ultimately drop this rule by 1993 with the release of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System.[50] It also required all cartridges to be manufactured by Nintendo, and to be paid for in full before they were manufactured. Cartridges could not be returned to Nintendo, so publishers assumed all the financial risk of selling all units ordered. As a result, some publishers lost more money due to distress sales of remaining inventory at the end of the NES era than they ever earned in profits from sales of the games.


It’s also in Christian and Western history. Originally the Jews cornered the market on charging interest on loans and their successful business innovation of making loans for profit is what has led to capitalist growth and the lifting of billions from poverty and starvation globally. Interest isn’t greed, its the time value of money. And modern “targeted” interest rates in the U.S. and elsewhere are government-subsidized giveaways to whomever can qualify for them.
On Friday, September 19, the Dow ended the week at 11,388.44. It was only slightly below its Monday open of 11,416.37. The Fed established the Asset-Backed Commercial Paper Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility. It loaned $122.8 billion to banks to buy commercial paper from money market funds. The Fed's announcement confirmed that credit markets were partially frozen and in panic mode.

This sluggish growth and a near 30% plunge in Shanghai shares prompted swift action from the Chinese government, which announced plans to cut personal income taxes and cut the Reserve Requirement Ratio for the fourth time to encourage more leverage on top of the debt-disabled economy. The government has even bought ETF’s to prop of the sinking Chinese stock market. As a result, shares recently surged 4% in one day. However, more than half of those gains were quickly reversed the following day as investors took a sober look at whether the Chinese government is starting to lose its grip on the economy. 
Based on interviews and our own independent matching of the 6,438 W&R executions to the 147,577 CME executions during that time, we know for certain that the algorithm used by W&R never took nor required liquidity. It always posted sell orders above the market and waited for a buyer; it never crossed the bid/ask spread. That means that none of the 6,438 trades were executed by hitting a bid. [...] [S]tatements from page 36 of Kirilenko's paper[4] cast serious doubt on the credibility of their analysis. [...] It is widely believed that the "sell program" refers to the algo selling the W&R contracts. However, based on the statements above, this cannot be true. The sell program must be referring to a different algo, or Kirilenko's analysis is fundamentally flawed, because the paper incorrectly identifies trades that hit the bid as executions by the W&R algo.
The bottom line for macro-investors is that rising rates may slow an already-sluggish economy, which, in turn may depress corporate earnings. Normally that would be a paramount concern, but with corporations swimming in record amounts of cash - with more on the way from the business-friendly GOP tax law - the market's extreme reaction may be overstated.
The difficulty in getting a mortgage combined with extremely high student debt strapping down the millennial generation continues to nudge people toward renting. Americans don’t have the savings they used to have that allowed them to put a down payment on a home. Historically, the average savings rate of a person’s income was 8.3 percent, but today that number is 5.5 percent. Rising education and housing costs continue to burden the new generation of potential home buyers, driving down home ownership rates in the U.S.
Free movement of people was only one aspect of why people voted to leave the eu. There is another even more pressing, that of regaining sovereignty given away by those who thought nothing of betraying it in the first place. Yes the Gov. could be brought down by the latest betrayal of sovereignty, not only the Gov but the Tory Party itself, with no chance of a come back for decades to come, if ever.
Housing supply is also an important dynamic to consider when looking at a then-and-now analysis of the housing market. Since mortgages were being given out with little regard to the borrower’s ability to pay back the loan, new home building skyrocketed to meet the new demand. In 2005, new home sales hit a 52 year high with 1.28 million new homes being built. Ten years later, only 500,000 new homes were constructed, dropping 61 percent from the peak ten years prior. An overall lack of inventory continues to be a driver in price appreciation.

As a case in point, I present to you subprime auto loans, or loans given to consumers with less-than-prime credit scores (usually 550 to 619 on the FICO score scale). Having a lower credit score typically gives these folks fewer lending options, which allows lenders that are willing to work with subprime consumers to charge a notably higher interest rate, relative to prime-rated consumers. The problem is these consumers usually have subpar credit scores for a reason, and delinquency rates on these subprime and deep subprime loans are shooting higher.


The heads of the SEC and CFTC often point out that they are running an IT museum. They have photographic evidence to prove it—the highest-tech background that The New York Times (on September 21, 2010) could find for a photo of Gregg Berman, the SEC’s point man on the Flash, was a corner with five PCs, a Bloomberg, a printer, a fax, and three TVs on the wall with several large clocks.
This book has lots of good statistical information to back up its premises...which seem to boil down to...Buy a home within your means (and he does define how to find that out, which is a good thing if you can't figure it out on your own)...Anticipate that the home market could go down as interest rates rise making your home harder to sell in a pinch (to his credit, he tells you how to avoid that too)...and a few other common sense rules of buying that could be applied to many things. If a person is going to spend 6 figures on anything, you would think that they would take the time to learn what they are doing, but it is obvious to the author and to many other people watchers in the world that too many people just don't put effort into watching where they put their money. So, if you are a person who carefully spends your money without rushing into any purchase, you probably have enough sense to not have to buy this book; and if you are person who is just the opposite, you probably aren't too concerned even now about learning anything about your home purchase, so you aren't even reading this review. Last note: if you were going to buy properties to use for investment purposes, this book could be of assistance. Hope this helps.
You’re correct – some are predicting a blood bath – but they have been doing so for years. And I agree some segments of the Sydney property market will fall more than 20% – especially all those new apartments many of which were sold to unsuspecting investors. I’ve read the sources you’ve quoted and I’ve also read the comments from DR Phil Lowe – our RBA Governor – I don’t think he’s a fool – I’ll listen to him
Take your money out of the bank ASAP.  If you still keep your money in the bank, go there and remove as much as you can while leaving in enough to pay your bills. Although it wasn’t a market collapse in Greece recently, the banks did close and limit ATM withdrawals.  People went for quite some time without being able to access their money, but were able to have a sense of normalcy by transferring money online to pay bills or using their debit cards to make purchases.  Get your cash out. You don’t want to be at the mercy of the banks.
As an investment banker who buys blocks of mortgages around America this is an important subject as to whether the value of my collateral will deteriorate. Talbott does a good job presenting his case that there is a relationship between household income and housing prices. His point is well taken that low interest rates have fueled this boom and that when rates rise, housing prices will have to come down. So, from the perspective of his thesis, I found this to be well written and well documented even if I agree there is a risk but do not believe that it will be significant.
So take this time to go over your holdings and tally up how much you have in stocks and how much in bonds. If you're not sure of the asset make-up in some of your investments — which may be the case if you own funds that invest in a combination of stocks and bonds — plug the names or ticker symbols of your funds into Morningstar's Instant X-Ray tool, and you'll see how your portfolio overall is divvied up between stocks, bonds and cash.
After October 29, 1929, stock prices had nowhere to go but up, so there was considerable recovery during succeeding weeks. Overall, however, prices continued to drop as the United States slumped into the Great Depression, and by 1932 stocks were worth only about 20 percent of their value in the summer of 1929. The stock market crash of 1929 was not the sole cause of the Great Depression, but it did act to accelerate the global economic collapse of which it was also a symptom. By 1933, nearly half of America’s banks had failed, and unemployment was approaching 15 million people, or 30 percent of the workforce.
It’s beyond Black Monday. The next stock market crash will combine the effects of Black Monday with the tech bubble of 1999-2000 and the recession that resulted from the crash of 2007-2008. The Shiller CAPE ratio, which measures a stock’s performance by comparing its price against earnings over a 10-year period, has reached the very point when Alan Greenspan pronounced his famous “irrational exuberance” speech. (Source: “The stock market’s valuation is back to the point where Greenspan warned of ‘irrational exuberance’,” CNBC, October 31, 2017.)
Secondly, he says, higher interest rates raise borrowing costs for consumers and companies, so auto loans and mortgages become more expensive and companies have a harder time tapping the debt market. "Clearly, higher rates are not good for housing or auto sales," says Ed Yardeni, chief investment strategist at Yardeni Research. And if sales of these big-ticket items slow, so does the broader economy.
On Black Monday, the markets were a bit different than today. That’s the explanation that many market optimists like to offer when they explain why another Black Monday can’t happen. That is, the market cannot lose some 23% of its value in a single trading session. They might be right, but in the opposite direction. The markets now have human as well as computer input through so-called robot trading. They have more variables and are more complicated. But information and risks travel much faster. If anything, the risks of a major market crash are higher today.
Umm sorry, but you know nothing relevant about the 2007-08 financial collapse and should do some research before claiming you know anything about financial theory. I agree with you that some interest is fine and fair, but Calvin is quite correct that in this case is was simple greed, gambling and dishonest on the part of your “bankers” that’s to blame. The subprime mortgage risk is not what caused the collapse in 2007-2008. What happened here is that you “bankers” even though they knew that interest rates were only in the 6% percent range, and thus grouping the mortgages together and selling them as investment could only net a profit in that same range (6%) instead claimed that they were worth 10-100 times what they were and sold them as such. Normal (not subprime mortgages) were regulated by law so that your cheating bankers(to be fair this was not all bankers, only dishonest ones) were not allowed to claim that they are worth anything more than the rate of return which is obviously the truthful and correct rate maximum that an investor would see. Sub-prime mortgages the other hand, were not regulated by law and nothing prevented your “bankers” falsely claiming and selling the mortgates as an investement with an expected derivative return many times higher than could ever be possible with the real interest rates.

Jesazzzz Koverist. This means that post calapse, the city air will be unbreathable from all the garbage, rotting and decaying stinking dead bodies all over all the major cities, meaning that, the DUMB-F…k survivors, these are the New Preppers, who were not preppers, who jus scavenged, tore up the restaurants, fast food joints, distribution centers, possible white, middle class, people who laughed at us prepper types, who went, damn, lets get all the food and water now, we are clearing the f…k out of town to the country. Now we can see if we awesome preppers who were able to GTFOT, GET THE F… OUT OF TOWN TYPES. then we preppers can see literally, get this millions, 50,000,000 plus, fleeing the cities, jamed up on the freeways with Jade Helm 15, russian and chinses soldiers at check points grabbing people, shooting the men point blank range and grabbing women and children off the freeways, gun ships and drones all the sky, tanks, and other military equipment suddenly rolled out on the streets of all the major cities shooting the men on all the major freeways in all the major cities. Trapped Patriots, veterans and Local Red Necks and new Freedom fighters of all races, black, white, hispanic, asain and other unreconizable nationals that we dont or cant tell wtf? there are, now engaged in gun battles against one another. The kind of situation, that even tough guys like myself litterally loose bladder control, and piss my pants at the mere taught of it. As we literally witness the first stage of calapse.


Stock markets witnessed a sudden sell-off in the afternoon dealings on Friday with Sensex crashing 1,128 points and Nifty falling well below 11,000-mark while DHFL nosedived 60% following the rout in NBFCs and housing finance companies. DHFL share price saw the biggest intraday plunge in its stock market trading history on Friday. Most of the housing finance companies bottomed to their respective multi-year lows in the trades. Shares of Yes Bank, Maruti Suzuki, HDFC, Infosys and Sun Pharma were the biggest negative point contributors to the headline indices.
Thanks Ben. If I knew I’d be rich! Yes, everyone’s looking ahead to 2019 and I’m developing a post on the topic right now. We likely won’t see a crash anytime soon, unless the G7 get carried away by all the tariff talk. Which could happen. The rest of the world has become addicted to US spending, although they describe that as “beneficial interdependent trade.” They’re actually getting surly about it, (G7 meeting) so we can’t say this won’t escalate into something bad. It looks like they’re going to threaten Trump with Tariffs and numbers and see if he bites. He hasn’t even dealt with China yet, so this does look scary. As you said, prices are rising and the demand is there. As long as Millennials are able to buy, this boom could go on a long time. However, how many of the G7 would enjoy seeing the US economy plummet?
As an investment banker who buys blocks of mortgages around America this is an important subject as to whether the value of my collateral will deteriorate. Talbott does a good job presenting his case that there is a relationship between household income and housing prices. His point is well taken that low interest rates have fueled this boom and that when rates rise, housing prices will have to come down. So, from the perspective of his thesis, I found this to be well written and well documented even if I agree there is a risk but do not believe that it will be significant.

The mid-1980s were a time of strong economic optimism. From August 1982 to its peak in August 1987, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) grew from 776 to 2722. The rise in market indices for the 19 largest markets in the world averaged 296 percent during this period. The average number of shares traded on the NYSE(New York Stock Exchange) had risen from 65 million shares to 181 million shares.[26]
In Australia, ABS data confirmed that home prices fell again in the June quarter, skilled vacancies rose slightly and population growth remained strong in the March quarter. In terms of house prices, our assessment remains that the combination of tighter bank lending standards, rising supply, poor affordability and falling capital growth expectations point to more falls ahead, with Melbourne and Sydney likely to see top to bottom home price falls of around 15% out to 2020.

The current bull market is now in its 10th year. We have no idea when it might end and give way to a bear market. However, it’s inevitable that at some point it will. Twice during 2018 we have already seen a spike in market volatility. This inevitably leads to fears of a market crash. The truth is that a stock market crash can never really be predicted. People who predicted crashes in the past are the same people who predicted crashes in the years they didn’t happen.
Tom Lee had reduced his year-end Bitcoin price prediction from $25,000 to $15,000 last week, Nov. 16, following a massive decline on the markets that started on Nov. 14, with Bitcoin hitting yearly lows. Previously, the crypto bull had, several times, predicted that Bitcoin’s price would rise above $20,000 for the year’s end. Lee announced his first prediction in January this year, advising “aggressive buying,” while considering the $9,000 price point as “the biggest buying opportunity in 2018.”
It’s freeing up that $650,000 to invest with that really makes the strategy work, even if housing prices just plateau from here. Without going to my spreadsheets you can back-of-the-envelope it: yearly rents in Toronto are about 5% of house prices (i.e., yearly rent for a house that sells for $650k would be about $32.5k), and that gets you pretty much the same house (there are some nice rentals out there). In Vancouver, 4%.
As an investment banker who buys blocks of mortgages around America this is an important subject as to whether the value of my collateral will deteriorate. Talbott does a good job presenting his case that there is a relationship between household income and housing prices. His point is well taken that low interest rates have fueled this boom and that when rates rise, housing prices will have to come down. So, from the perspective of his thesis, I found this to be well written and well documented even if I agree there is a risk but do not believe that it will be significant.
Mati Greenspan, an analyst with the trading platform eToro, told Business Insider on Tuesday that volumes from Japan and South Korea had been tailing off in recent days. Traders in these markets are usually buyers, and a large-scale exit could have created an imbalance in the market, with more sellers than buyers driving down prices and sparking a panic.

Some experts cite the euphoria of stock markets during their bull runs. They suggest the heightened unrealistic expectations create a platform for disaster and when reality strikes, truth launches panicked sell offs. Some say the overvalued stocks, economy, and general optimism present right is a sure predecessor of a crash. It may have been that way in 1987.
The joint 2010 report "portrayed a market so fragmented and fragile that a single large trade could send stocks into a sudden spiral",[23] and detailed how a large mutual fund firm selling an unusually large number of E-Mini S&P contracts first exhausted available buyers, and then how high-frequency traders (HFT) started aggressively selling, accelerating the effect of the mutual fund's selling and contributing to the sharp price declines that day.[42][23]

Not only has subprime lending seen a major decline, but mortgages have also become much harder to attain due to stringent lending standards. According to CoreLogic’s Housing Credit Index, loans originated in 2016 were among the highest quality originated in the last 15 years. This is greatly due to the type of borrowers able to qualify for loans. The current average credit score for borrowers being granted mortgages is 739. In October 2009, the average FICO score was 686, according to Fair Isaac. The lowest one percent of mortgages issued have credit scores averaging 622-624. Compared to the average range in 2001 of 490-510, the standard to get financing has risen substantially, and as a result, the likelihood of default has dropped. Lenders have done this to ensure the economy doesn’t again become propped on bad loans like it was leading up to the Great Recession.
Till August 1987 markets were favorable. In fact, as per the records of 25th August 1987, the Dow was of a 2722.44, which was almost a record hike. But after that, it only started to depreciate. An 8.4% drop was recorded on September 22nd, 1987. But then there was an increase of Dow again. A 5.9% increase was recorded on the 2nd of October 1987. But that was only for the time being. Once again the Dow started to fall and by October 19th the market had badly crashed; so much so that the Dow had dropped to 508. That would be almost a 22.6% drop on that single day. And if the drop had to be measured from the peak on 25th August, it was a whopping 36.7%. October 19th has since been referred to as the Black Monday.

Yes Bank share price collapsed as much as 34% to more than a 2-year low on Friday morning after country's fifth-largest private sector lender said that the present MD & CEO Rana Kapoor may continue as MD & CEO till 31 January 2019.  The board of directors of the bank are scheduled to meet on 25 September 2018 to decide on the future course of action, Yes Bank said in a regulatory filing. The stock of Yes Bank bottomed to over a 2-year low of Rs 210.1, down 34.03% on BSE while the stock tanked 31.67% to Rs 218.10 on NSE. Unusually high trading volumes were seen on the counters of Yes Bank, as at 9:39 am, about 10.5 crore equity shares of Yes Bank exchanged hands on both NSE and BSE with 9.7 crore equity shares being traded on NSE alone.

I have good reasons why i prep. I just dont have any confidence in govenment and am no convinved that covernment and city officials, etites etc are busy sitting around worry thier entitles asses off worry about me not eating or having a hard time. Or i am being too paranoid. Agency ass clowns think that you all are so dumb to relax and so that they can steer thinking by convine shtf-effers that i have bad grammar and can’t spell.


Job one in the midst of a stock market crash is to be aware of your own exposure to the market. Are you highly leveraged as a margin investor? Is your investment portfolio overly weighted with riskier growth stocks or other more-speculative stocks? Has your personal financial situation changed significantly over the course of a 24-hour market collapse?
The Fed didn't realize a collapse was brewing until March 2007. It realized that hedge fund housing losses could threaten the economy. Throughout the summer, banks became unwilling to lend to each other. They were afraid that they would receive bad MBS in return. Bankers didn't know how much bad debt they had on their books. No one wanted to admit it. If they did, then their credit rating would be lowered. Then, their stock price would fall, and they would be unable to raise more funds to stay in business.
One of the big drivers of the stock market since 2008 has been monetary policy: in specific, the Quantitative Easing program of the Federal Reserve and the low interest rates. While the former put a lot of new money into bonds (keeping those interest rates low), the latter kept the world's least risky investment paying out very little. As a result, a lot of money chased better returns in the stock market.
The internal reasons included innovations with index futures and portfolio insurance. I've seen accounts that maybe roughly half the trading on that day was a small number of institutions with portfolio insurance. Big guys were dumping their stock. Also, the futures market in Chicago was even lower than the stock market, and people tried to arbitrage that. The proper strategy was to buy futures in Chicago and sell in the New York cash market. It made it hard – the portfolio insurance people were also trying to sell their stock at the same time.[14]

What is commercial paper ? Commercial paper is a money - market security issued by large corporations to obtain funds to meet short-term debt obligations and is backed only by an issuing bank or company promise to pay the face amount on maturity date specified on the note . Since it is not backed by collateral , only firm with excellent credit ratings from a recognised credit rating agency will be able to sell their commercial papers at reasonable price .Commercial paper is usually sold at a discount from face value , and generally carries lower interest repayment rates than bonds due to shorter maturities of commercial paper .


That's bad news because a rise in global prices not only pushes up dollar demand by importers, which impacts the already-widening current account deficit, but also raises inflation concerns back home. Disappointing CAD data - predicted to deteriorate to 2.8 per cent this year from 1.9 per cent of GDP in FY18 - has been haunting Dalal Street for the past few weeks now.

Usually, HFT programs and computer trading works without a hitch. But once in a while problems do crop up. Back on Aug. 24, 2015, the United States’ three major stock indexes plunged on the open, but would recover much of their losses by midday. Among the reasons blamed for the dip were market makers and HFT traders. With so many stocks within the S&P 500 failing to open on time, and a number of exchange-traded funds under trading halts, HFTs and other high-speed traders shut down their systems, removing much-needed liquidity from the marketplace and exacerbating the early-day decline.
My wife an I are looking to buy our first home and to know surprise, yes we are millennials. We live in Omaha, NE. According to CNBC it is one of the top 5 most difficult cities for millennials to buy their first home thanks to very low supply and high prices. Should we opt to continue to rent a 1 bedroom apt for $800 per month while waiting out this craziness. Or should we buy a home now to get locked in a historically low interest rate? We are torn, because we want to get into a home, but are patient and disciplined enough to wait if that’s the best financial decision. Do you see this overvalued market correcting anytime soon? Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated.
The turbulence of the election, rising interest rates against overheated housing markets does give some plausibility to a US housing crash in 2018 or 2019. Proponents of an upcoming crash point to too many Americans living lavish lifestyles, still buying expensive foreign luxury cars on a $40,000 salary, while sitting on over-leveraged monster mortgages that could be subject to quickly rising mortgage rates.
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