The yuan has fallen nearly 10% against the dollar since April ‘18. The Chinese are currently trying to keep the currency from falling below the key support level of seven to the dollar. The yuan hasn’t traded that low in more than a decade; but holding that line has become more difficult as China dances capriciously from deleveraging to massive stimulus measures. In order to defend the value of the Yuan, China has depleted much of its dollar reserves.

In 2005, subprime loans were rampant and as a result, the country over-leveraged itself. Subprime loans, the riskiest loan type given to borrowers with low credit scores, totaled more than $620 billion. Fast forward ten years and subprime originations make up only 5 percent of the mortgage market and add up to $56 billion. Compare that to 2005 when subprime origination made up 20 percent of the market. This represents a 91 percent decline from the height of bad loans that set up the economic crash.
The sandpile study was introduced in a 1987 paper by Per Bak, Chao Tang and Kurt Wiesenfeld, three scientists working at the Physics Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Ironically, the paper was presented to Physical Review Letters a few months before the stock market crash of October 1987, still today the largest ever one-day drop. The title was "Self-Organized Criticality" and falls within a branch of mathematics known as Complexity Theory, which studies how systems can organize themselves into unexpected behaviors arising from the interaction of its smallest and seemingly independent components.
Interesting points. To say a 2 billion dollar a day trade deficit is meaningless might be understating it. Running trade deficits every year is dangerous and leads to the recession you’re fearing. It’s the trade policies that make it happen. The global economy was highly dependent on US willing to run huge trade deficits and Europe and China are undergoing withdrawal problems.
And just when you think that this may all be a bunch of bul…h…t. A free energy inventer gets a phone call from a Tv morning show, calling him raising hell on his ass telling him, that he needs to buy up all the free energy electrical devices now, the free energy inventor declines his offer, Host hangs up on him pissed and then calls him back asking him nicely if he could allow him to send him a truck to empty his entire store inventory, the owner declines. Store owner inventor is told by said talk show host, that the elites are getting everything in place to plug the plug. Its obvious that its a planned calapse. The inventor tells us that we will be needing electicity to power up devices, because he was told that the grid will go down, and obvious planned EMP ATTACK on all our major cites, “planned” it seems.
Technical correction - Market trends doesn’t go up successively higher, instead it moves like a set of waves taking two steps forward and one step backward. The recent selloff can be perceived as a backward step ! It’s a term in technical analysis, Traders attempt to study market trends using technical analysis, which means using price charts and graphs to make investment or trading decisions on stock market
"I think we're going to work through this continued intersection of domestic and international political risk, with the fact the economy is very good and the earnings projection is very good, and the valuations are creeping up, but they're by no means excessive, with interest rates at this level," said Julian Emanuel, chief equity and derivatives strategist at BTIG. "But our view has been all along that basically you've got to fix the relationship with China in order to really make material further upside progress."
Despite fears of a repeat of the 1930s Depression, the market rallied immediately after the crash, posting a record one-day gain of 102.27 the very next day and 186.64 points on Thursday October 22. It took only two years for the Dow to recover completely; by September 1989, the market had regained all of the value it had lost in the 1987 crash. The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained six-tenths of a percent during the calendar year 1987.

Since the crashes of 1929 and 1987, safeguards have been put in place to prevent crashes due to panicked stockholders selling their assets. Such safeguards include trading curbs, or circuit breakers, which prevent any trade activity whatsoever for a certain period of time following a sharp decline in stock prices, in hopes of stabilizing the market and preventing it from falling further.

This also means that it is a mistake to think of investors as a bunch of clueless, greed-driven lemmings falling off a cliff during a market crash. For example, during the real estate boom of the mid-2000s people kept buying homes despite an abundance of media articles pointing out that the property market was swept in a mania. There was no question, even then, that the market was overheated. So why did people continue to buy homes?


The CAPE ratio (also known as Shiller P/E ratio) is a long term cyclically adjusted measure of equity valuations devised by the respected economist Robert Shiller. The CAPE ratio has been at historically high level for several years, although high valuations alone do not mean a crash is imminent. Whether US stock prices today are in a stock bubble or not is debatable. In general, bubbles do not necessarily imply a crash, unless there is a catalyst.

The US Fed meets on September 26th but the CME Fed tool is already indicating a probability of 95% for a rate hike by the Fed. That is not good news for the Indian markets. It will impel the RBI to front end another rate hike to prevent any risk of capital market outflows. Also higher Fed rates will lead to a stronger dollar and that by itself will put pressure on the INR, which is already vulnerable at this point of time.

In 1982, a price war began between Commodore and Texas Instruments, and home computers became as inexpensive as video-game consoles;[12] after Commodore cut the retail price of the 64 to $300 in June 1983 some stores began selling it for as little as $199.[9] Dan Gutman, founder in 1982 of Video Games Player magazine, recalled in 1987 that "As the first wave of the personal computer boom started, the video games market began to taper off. People asked themselves, 'Why should I buy a video game system when I can buy a computer that will play games and do so much more?'"[13] The Boston Phoenix stated in September 1983 about the cancellation of the Intellivision III, "Who was going to pay $200-plus for a machine that could only play games?"[9] Commodore explicitly targeted video game players. Spokesman William Shatner asked in VIC-20 commercials "Why buy just a video game from Atari or Intellivision?", stating that "unlike games, it has a real computer keyboard" yet "plays great games too".[14] The company offered competitive upgrades, where rival systems could be traded for a discount toward the purchase of a Commodore 64. Commodore's ownership of chip fabricator MOS Technology allowed manufacture of integrated circuits in-house, so the VIC-20 and C64 sold for much lower prices than competing home computers.
The average price of a detached house in the GTA rose to $1,019,416 from $1,008,361 last month. YoY, detached home prices have fallen 1.4% in the 416 area code and .4% in the 905 area code.  Home prices in the 416 area code fell from $1,342,363 to $1,311,265 , a drop of $31,000. The price of a condo apartment in the 416 area code fell from $615,582 to $603,153 yet that average price 8.6% higher than last October.
It was the most devastating stock market crash in the history of the United States, when taking into consideration the full extent and duration of its after effects.[1] The crash, which followed the London Stock Exchange's crash of September, signalled the beginning of the 12-year Great Depression that affected all Western industrialized countries.[2]
The crucial point of their paper was that sandpile avalanches could not be predicted, and not because of randomness (there was no random component in their model) or because the authors could not figure out how to come up with equations to describe it. Rather, they found it impossible in a fundamental sense to set up equations that would describe the sandpile model analytically, so there was no way to predict what the sandpile would do. The only way to observe its behavior was to set up the model in a computer and let it run.
The benchmark S&P BSE Sensex swung from a 1 percent gain to a drop of as much as 3 percent -- its wildest intraday move in more than four years -- before closing with a 0.8 percent loss. Friday’s declines showed that investors remain jittery about Indian financial shares after a recent default by Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services Ltd. shook confidence in the sector.
Our deficit and debt as numbers alone are kind of meaningless.. It only matters relative to other countries and relative to our GDP. For better or worse current economic theory under globalization seems to expect every country to grow and amass more debt while keeping those two values in some kind of balance. So it is hard even for an economist to say how relevant the size of the number is. And a lot of that theory is working out rather poorly for many Euro countries right now.
In 2005, subprime loans were rampant and as a result, the country over-leveraged itself. Subprime loans, the riskiest loan type given to borrowers with low credit scores, totaled more than $620 billion. Fast forward ten years and subprime originations make up only 5 percent of the mortgage market and add up to $56 billion. Compare that to 2005 when subprime origination made up 20 percent of the market. This represents a 91 percent decline from the height of bad loans that set up the economic crash.
I think the US has a super position if Trump can get past all his enemies and stimulate the GDP and domestic productivity. It’s not easy to bring good jobs back. He’s really bit off more than he can chew. If he can cut small business taxes, that would launch the country into boom times. If he doesn’t do something soon, because things are quiet right now, even his biggest supporters could possibly turn on him.
In a 2011 article that appeared on the Wall Street Journal on the eve of the anniversary of the 2010 "flash crash", it was reported that high-frequency traders were then less active in the stock market. Another article in the journal said trades by high-frequency traders had decreased to 53% of stock-market trading volume, from 61% in 2009.[81] Former Delaware senator Edward E. Kaufman and Michigan senator Carl Levin published a 2011 op-ed in The New York Times a year after the Flash Crash, sharply critical of what they perceived to be the SEC's apparent lack of action to prevent a recurrence.[82]
The bottom line for macro-investors is that rising rates may slow an already-sluggish economy, which, in turn may depress corporate earnings. Normally that would be a paramount concern, but with corporations swimming in record amounts of cash - with more on the way from the business-friendly GOP tax law - the market's extreme reaction may be overstated.

In 2011 trades by high-frequency traders accounted for 28% of the total volume in the futures markets, which included currencies and commodities, an increase from 22% in 2009. However, the growth of computerized and high-frequency trading in commodities and currencies coincided with a series of "flash crashes" in those markets. The role of human market makers, who match buyers and sellers and provide liquidity to the market, was more and more played by computer programs. If those program traders pulled back from the market, then big "buy" or "sell" orders could have led to sudden, big swings. It would have increased the probability of surprise distortions, as in the equity markets, according to a professional investor.[citation needed] In February 2011, the sugar market took a dive of 6% in just one second. On March 1, 2011, cocoa futures prices dropped 13% in less than a minute on the Intercontinental Exchange. Cocoa plunged $450 to a low of $3,217 a metric ton before rebounding quickly. The U.S. dollar tumbled against the yen on March 16, 2011, falling 5% in minutes, one of its biggest moves ever. According to a former cocoa trader: ' "The electronic platform is too fast; it doesn't slow things down" like humans would. '[81]
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While there are risks for local bubbles in markets experiencing inorganic growth, like the Miami condo market for example, it’s wise for investors to focus more on their own investment strategy and less on speculation of the overall market. If able to identify and clearly understand a market and its economy, investors can find success with single-family investments.
Of course they are, that is why there are so many EU 27 trolls on here especially German ones like H/BLUFF and PIETER, WTO is OUR ACE CARD if ONLY MAY had played it properly, thankfully the EU will have to listen as that card WILL come into play automatically now, as BRINO will be REJECTED, and no deal WTO is by default, as legislated and now set in UK law, time to get her out, and a BREXITEER in, and threaten the EU properly with it, OUR WAY ON OUR TERMS OR WE DESTROY YOU.
Mathematicians have studied housing bubbles, such as The University of Pennsylvania, and their HOUSING BUBBLE STRUCTURAL MODEL AND HYPOTHESES models couldn’t figure it out. The factors they studied do play a role, but housing bubbles and crashes are likely a cultural phenomenon (outside of major recessions).  It comes down to values, attitudes, dreams and panic emotions.

Despite the dangers of speculation, it was widely believed that the stock market would continue to rise forever. On March 25, 1929, after the Federal Reserve warned of excessive speculation, a mini crash occurred as investors started to sell stocks at a rapid pace, exposing the market's shaky foundation.[6] Two days later, banker Charles E. Mitchell announced that his company, the National City Bank, would provide $25 million in credit to stop the market's slide.[6] Mitchell's move brought a temporary halt to the financial crisis, and call money declined from 20 to 8 percent.[6] However, the American economy showed ominous signs of trouble:[6] steel production declined, construction was sluggish, automobile sales went down, and consumers were building up high debts because of easy credit.[6] Despite all these economic trouble signs and the market breaks in March and May 1929, stocks resumed their advance in June and the gains continued almost unabated until early September 1929 (the Dow Jones average gained more than 20% between June and September). The market had been on a nine-year run that saw the Dow Jones Industrial Average increase in value tenfold, peaking at 381.17 on September 3, 1929.[6] Shortly before the crash, economist Irving Fisher famously proclaimed, "Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[7] The optimism and financial gains of the great bull market were shaken after a well publicized early September prediction from financial expert Roger Babson that "a crash was coming".[citation needed] The initial September decline was thus called the "Babson Break" in the press. This was the start of the Great Crash, although until the severe phase of the crash in October, many investors regarded the September "Babson Break" as a "healthy correction" and buying opportunity.[citation needed]

I don’t know this much, if the grid is taken down, dileberately or not, once it goes down, it will trigger according to my scientits friend, The One Second After event. It will be like what i just posted. He said that this book, One second After is the actual research done on the effects of EMP and what to expect if the grid goes down. So we need to be ready. Any one without food and water is completely screwed. If the stock market is crashing right now, and we know it’s and engineered crahs involving Russia, China, and the US cabal, then we need to get ready.


Stock up on supplies.  Make sure you are prepped. If you’re behind on your preparedness efforts and need to do this quickly, you can order buckets of emergency food just to have some on hand. (Learn how to build an emergency food supply using freeze dried food HERE) Hit the grocery store or wholesale club and stock up there, too, on  your way home.
In the long term, this may reflect that the Great Recession of 2008 is finally over—especially given that the US economy has been at full employment for a while. Time will tell what a new Federal Reserve chairman will implement in terms of policy, but giving the Fed options to reduce rates again as necessary is a positive sign for global economic outlook.

For example, really big daily price moves should be fairly uncommon, and during normal market periods they are. However, at a period of a crash, a lot of big moves can often be strung over just a few weeks, something called volatility clustering. This means that the models that hold up fairly well in normal markets, just aren’t relevant to a crash. Crashes are something like when a man changes into a werewolf, the normal rules for a human don’t apply. During a crash the stock market becomes a different beast.


Technical correction - Market trends doesn’t go up successively higher, instead it moves like a set of waves taking two steps forward and one step backward. The recent selloff can be perceived as a backward step ! It’s a term in technical analysis, Traders attempt to study market trends using technical analysis, which means using price charts and graphs to make investment or trading decisions on stock market
Stock market crashes are social phenomena where external economic events combine with crowd behavior and psychology in a positive feedback loop where selling by some market participants drives more market participants to sell. Generally speaking, crashes usually occur under the following conditions:[1] a prolonged period of rising stock prices and excessive economic optimism, a market where P/E ratios (Price-Earning ratio) exceed long-term averages, and extensive use of margin debt and leverage by market participants. Other aspects such as wars, large-corporation hacks, changes in federal laws and regulations, and natural disasters of highly economically productive areas may also influence a significant decline in the NYSE value of a wide range of stocks. All such stock drops may result in the rise of stock prices for corporations competing against the affected corporations.
Predicting housing prices is famously difficult. And forecasting housing meltdowns like the one that nearly brought down the global financial system in 2008 may be downright impossible. For now, though, the way experts cautiously paint the future for next year is closer to the picture of a landing plane than that of a rocket ship plummeting earthward.
Neil Kashkari talks extensively about false prophets (Alan Greenspan) and the sources of market bubbles such as $100 barrel oil, and other uncontrollable situations.  He says market bubbles and crashes are very complex and the source is often completely unexpected. Could the oil sheiks take the US economy down again? Could China do it? Is the $20 Trillion debt a threat? Or is just the end of a bull run in the stock market?
Japanese asset price bubble	1991		Lasting approximately twenty years, through at least the end of 2011, share and property price bubble bursts and turns into a long deflationary recession. Some of the key economic events during the collapse of the Japanese asset price bubble include the 1997 Asian financial crisis and the Dot-com bubble. In addition, more recent economic events, such as the late-2000s financial crisis and August 2011 stock markets fall have prolonged this period.	

using cities like vancouver and toronto to back up your theory is telling half the truth. you’re right, you cannot (and should not) time the market in such cities and the type of economy they’re based on. but using calgary as an example, it’s a whole different ball game,the collapse in economy with more than 40,000 jobs so far lost in alberta has caused a drop in house prices and will continue to do so till oil prices is goes up again. personally my wife and i have witnessed 4.5% drop in our home value (around $35,000) and we’re not going to wait and see our remaining $85,000 equity wiped out by the time the dust settles on this oil crash. it is financial suicide not to sell and rent for the next couple of years in such market.
You are obviously a banker of some sort. The bankers and the bank owners are fucking greedy bastards. PERIOD. Look at the situation. They make billions but cant provide benefits. It is the obligation of owners and investors to provide for workers. Its is supposed to work that way. But they and you KEEP it all and give the people swill. You al suck and have been compared to serial killers on a psychological level.. Stop defending the indefensible! you bought the bailout in 08 and the took bonuses for causing it. You put people and kids in th street then went sailing. So fuck you and your bastard cronies!!!!!
Very interesting comment Mark. Thanks for the insight. I do have doubts about President Trump. He’s never stated that he cares about small business. He didn’t state that when he talks about jobs leaving the US, he’s really talking about decisions by greedy multi-national corporate execs and how they stick it to the government. Your admiration of the Clintons I don’t know about. They’ve all been riding the national debt gravy train at ($20 Trillion now). But really, can you just keep living off of credit cards forever? Trump’s trying to turn things around. Even if morally, he’s at the same level as Bill Clinton, we can give him a try at bringing the good jobs back. You do realize China and India are educating and churning out high tech engineers by the boatload, using your money? Are US companies basically competing with overseas companies funded with American money? That’s not FREE TRADE, that’s tax evasion and outsourcing for cheap labor. Trump’s foolish obsession with Mexico and North Korea, might be a sign his mind isn’t 100%, but without Trump, you’re back on the debt gravy train.
A truly stunning result of these investigations is that the real-life frequency and size of market returns bear a notable resemblance to what is obtained by running very simple computer models. This also goes for earthquakes, solar flares, forest fires, and river floods: most of the simulations yield similar results to real life where events are frequent but small, but occasionally some gigantic one appears from nowhere.
Share Market Live: Indian stock markets (Sensex and Nifty) closed lower on Friday facing a knee-jerk reaction in the intraday deals with Sensex closing 280 points lower and Nifty slipping below 11,150. During the day, a market-wide sell-off was seen in stocks with the benchmark Sensex plummetting 1,128 points and Nifty tripping below 10,900. Shares of Yes Bank, collapsed 34% intraday, settled down 29% while DHFL shares ended down 42% after nosediving 60% intraday.
Whereas London was once the financial capital of western Europe, it remains to be seen if it will continue to be the financial capital of the European Union. Hence the drop in the value of the pound. Hence economic uncertainty for all companies which do business in the UK or the rest of the Continent. Will the UK fall into a recession? How will that affect global demand?

I find it hard to believe inventory increased by 50 percent, do you have any numbers on that? To see why inventory is low you need to look at the number of sales as well. If we were selling many more homes that would indicate inventory is low because people are buying everything up, but sales are down. That indicates it is not investors buying everything, but there are simply not enough houses for sale. That is what I see in most markets. There are not enough houses for everyone who wants to buy.


Take your money out of the bank ASAP.  If you still keep your money in the bank, go there and remove as much as you can while leaving in enough to pay your bills. Although it wasn’t a market collapse in Greece recently, the banks did close and limit ATM withdrawals.  People went for quite some time without being able to access their money, but were able to have a sense of normalcy by transferring money online to pay bills or using their debit cards to make purchases.  Get your cash out. You don’t want to be at the mercy of the banks.
A little more than a week later, stocks sank after a tweet from the president challenged the idea that Russia’s missile defense system could shoot down American smart bombs. Investors clearly worry that Trump’s tweeted rhetoric could be taken the wrong way by one or more global leaders, leading to escalation, or even conflict. Should that happen, the stock market could tank.
The Indian rupee jumped as much as 55 paise against the US dollar in the opening trade at the interbank foreign exchange market on Friday. The rupee regained a level of 71.8288, up 55 paise per unit US dollar, the Bloomberg data showed. India's government is planning to ask state oil firms to lock in their crude futures purchase prices, Reuters reported citing an unidentified government source, anticipating a spike when US sanctions on Iran snap back again in November. The move would be another step to tackle a slide in the rupee, as oil prices are putting pressure on India, the report added. 
I agree with the first posting. Interesting synopsis of the real estate market but your support of trump is really misplaced. He is a liar and cannot be trusted in ANYTHING he does. The 90s under Clinton and the GOP congress was the best economic expansion in our country’s history, period. Opportunity everywhere. Taxes were high, but we were more balanced. The Obama years were more about the Tea Party than anything. And guess what. Unless Trump solves this dilemma, he’s done and we’re done too. The FED is the only thing that has kept us from roiling over the edge for the last 8+ years. And I’m guessing under Trump after a few years of super heating the economy again, like under Way, we’ll be looking at another speculative crash. Why? Because the GOP has sold us down the river. NO? Everything in our lives now reflects business and speculative interests? Who benefits? Gee I don’t know. Maybe rich people that can speculate on everything that touches us. Time to leave. You stay in the game and keep preaching growth instead of stability. Let’s see how it all works out.
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