Nintendo portrayed these measures as intended to protect the public against poor-quality games, and placed a golden seal of approval on all licensed games released for the system. Further, Nintendo implemented its proprietary 10NES, a lockout chip which was designed to prevent cartridges made without the chip from being played on the NES. The 10NES lockout was not perfect, as later in the NES's lifecycle methods were found to bypass it, but it did sufficiently allow Nintendo to strengthen its publishing control to avoid the mistakes Atari had made.[51] These strict licensing measures backfired somewhat after Nintendo was accused of trust behavior.[52] In the long run, this pushed many western third-party publishers such as Electronic Arts away from Nintendo consoles, and would actively support competing consoles such as the Sega Genesis or Sony PlayStation. Most of the Nintendo platform-control measures were adopted by later console manufacturers such as Sega, Sony, Microsoft, and Intellivision Entertainment although not as stringently.
The past week saw “risk on” with the latest escalation in the US/China trade conflict being less than feared. This saw shares rally, bond yields rise, commodity prices gain, the US$ fall and the A$ rise. US shares rose 0.9%, Eurozone shares gained 2.1%, Japanese shares rose 3.4%, Chinese shares rose 5.2% and Australian shares rose 0.5%. While the Australian share market participated in the global share market rebound, over the last week it has gone back to underperforming again, reflecting its relatively defensive/high-yield characteristics.
As longtime China watchers know, the country’s still-immature markets are in many ways more bubble-prone than their Western counterparts, thanks to heavy involvement from retail investors who often take cues from government policy, rather than quaint notions like earnings. Tanking Chinese stocks—the Shanghai Composite is now down nearly 25% from its January peak—could therefore be taken...
So take this time to go over your holdings and tally up how much you have in stocks and how much in bonds. If you're not sure of the asset make-up in some of your investments — which may be the case if you own funds that invest in a combination of stocks and bonds — plug the names or ticker symbols of your funds into Morningstar's Instant X-Ray tool, and you'll see how your portfolio overall is divvied up between stocks, bonds and cash.
Will stock investors panic spill over to the housing markets and cause the Fed to pull back on rate increases? Is too much bad news, negative earnings outlook, rising interest rates, global trade friction, supply chain disruptions, or declining stock performance making investors panicky? Something about the market fundamentals is outside investor’s comfort zone. Is this a stock market correction, or a warning that the market could begin to slide?
Moreover, the leverage in many emerging markets and some advanced economies is clearly excessive. Commercial and residential real estate is far too expensive in many parts of the world. The emerging-market correction in equities, commodities, and fixed-income holdings will continue as global storm clouds gather. And as forward-looking investors start anticipating a growth slowdown in 2020, markets will reprice risky assets by 2019.
using cities like vancouver and toronto to back up your theory is telling half the truth. you’re right, you cannot (and should not) time the market in such cities and the type of economy they’re based on. but using calgary as an example, it’s a whole different ball game,the collapse in economy with more than 40,000 jobs so far lost in alberta has caused a drop in house prices and will continue to do so till oil prices is goes up again. personally my wife and i have witnessed 4.5% drop in our home value (around $35,000) and we’re not going to wait and see our remaining $85,000 equity wiped out by the time the dust settles on this oil crash. it is financial suicide not to sell and rent for the next couple of years in such market.
The panic began again on Black Monday (October 28), with the market closing down 12.8 percent. On Black Tuesday (October 29) more than 16 million shares were traded. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost another 12 percent and closed at 198—a drop of 183 points in less than two months. Prime securities tumbled like the issues of bogus gold mines. General Electric fell from 396 on September 3 to 210 on October 29. American Telephone and Telegraph dropped 100 points. DuPont fell from a summer high of 217 to 80, United States Steel from 261 to 166, Delaware and Hudson from 224 to 141, and Radio Corporation of America (RCA) common stock from 505 to 26. Political and financial leaders at first affected to treat the matter as a mere spasm in the market, vying with one another in reassuring statements. President Hoover and Treasury Secretary Andrew W. Mellon led the way with optimistic predictions that business was “fundamentally sound” and that a great revival of prosperity was “just around the corner.” Although the Dow Jones Industrial Average nearly reached the 300 mark again in 1930, it sank rapidly in May 1930. Another 20 years would pass before the Dow average regained enough momentum to surpass the 200-point level.
Housing supply is also an important dynamic to consider when looking at a then-and-now analysis of the housing market. Since mortgages were being given out with little regard to the borrower’s ability to pay back the loan, new home building skyrocketed to meet the new demand. In 2005, new home sales hit a 52 year high with 1.28 million new homes being built. Ten years later, only 500,000 new homes were constructed, dropping 61 percent from the peak ten years prior. An overall lack of inventory continues to be a driver in price appreciation.
“My sense is that the bottom that we were unable to find, chances are that we have found it. Often things tend to panic and sell of, unless it’s a black swan event My sense is that whatever information is there is not so serious; may be a couple of stocks may remain dicey but overall if there is no systemic risk, what we are doing is we are buying back nifty now; because it’s not like the whole world is coming to an end May be there is a problem; it can be contained; but once the news is out that news is irrelevant. Given that we are now near the 200-DMA, we could now have that sustainable rally. There is no value in worrying about what’s gone wrong. Try to buy because prices tend to factor in most things. My sense is that by the close we should recover some more Buy the good quality NBFCs, such as Bajaj Finance, L&T finance I would be a buyer now that the fall is already over,” investment advisor Ashwini Gujral told CNBC TV18.
Efforts to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement have proved more problematic than many in markets had hoped. Instead of ending Friday, talks with Canada will continue with expectations a deal could be reached within 90 days. Talks with Mexico had proceeded but the U.S. and Canada, as of Friday, appeared to have reached a sticking point.
The economy had been growing for most of the Roaring Twenties. It was a technological golden age, as innovations such as the radio, automobile, aviation, telephone, and the power grid were deployed and adopted. Companies that had pioneered these advances, like Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and General Motors, saw their stocks soar. Financial corporations also did well, as Wall Street bankers floated mutual fund companies (then known as investment trusts) like the Goldman Sachs Trading Corporation. Investors were infatuated with the returns available in the stock market, especially by the use of leverage through margin debt.

The Flash Crash: The Impact of High Frequency Trading on an Electronic Market, Andrei A. Kirilenko (Commodity Futures Trading Commission) Albert S. Kyle (University of Maryland; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)) Mehrdad Samadi (Commodity Futures Trading Commission) Tugkan Tuzun (University of Maryland—Robert H. Smith School of Business), October 1, 2010
I am very frightened. This past June, I allowed a financial advisor to convince me that my portfolio made up of primarily stocks was risky for a retiree. I have been retired since 2005 and had held the same stocks since then. These stocks included 2 Canadian banks, BCE, TransAlta, and Emera. I was receiving dividends o $4,800 per year and all the stocks consistently raised their dividends. The financial advisor put me in2 costly mutual funds which proceeded to lose me $ 1800 within days and also swallowed up up my incoming dividends from the former portfolio. By the time I was down $6,000 I panicked and pulled out of the mutual funds. And! This was in 2017. What I have left and what I thought would carry me through my retirement is now in a money market making very little and I am terrified daily as to reinvesting it.

Market collapses can really hurt older investors. A stock market collapse can inflict damage across the board, demographically, but the impact on older Americans is especially onerous. Think of a 67-year-old retiree whose assets are largely tied up in the stock market: The value of those assets plummets after a market crash. While a 25-year-old has plenty of time to rebuild portfolio assets, a 67-year-old does not, and doesn't have the needed income any longer to even play "catch up" in the stock market.
This is a remarkable passage because it resembles closely what one would read in an opinion-based analysis of a market event. The confusing illusion, of course, is that hindsight narratives of this kind could offer anything towards avoiding, let alone preventing, future disasters. In reality, no amount of knowledge of a sandpile system can possibly produce a usable forecast of the size and location of a major avalanche. It may be the same with a stock market crash.
We have entered a time when global events appear to be accelerating significantly.  Earlier today, bombs were mailed to major political leaders all over the United States.  In the Middle East, it looks like Israel and Hamas could go to war at any moment.  And we continue to see a rise in major seismic events – including three very large earthquakes that just hit the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

This is a remarkable passage because it resembles closely what one would read in an opinion-based analysis of a market event. The confusing illusion, of course, is that hindsight narratives of this kind could offer anything towards avoiding, let alone preventing, future disasters. In reality, no amount of knowledge of a sandpile system can possibly produce a usable forecast of the size and location of a major avalanche. It may be the same with a stock market crash.

No expert prediction or technical indicator is necessary. The makings of the next crash are already clear. Whether it’s Janet Yellen or Jerome Powell who will head the Federal Reserve after February 2018, interest rates can only move higher. At the current rate of debt, even 100 basis points (one percent) higher interest will mean $200.0 billion in additional (not all, mind you, just the extra bit) in debt.
To be clear, this isn't an exhaustive list of things that could potentially cause a stock market crash. And it's likely that more than one of these factors could combine to cause a crash. The 2008 crash, for one, was primarily caused by excessive speculation that caused a bubble in real estate prices, along with excessive leverage taken on by both consumers and financial institutions, as well as investor panic after banks started to fail.
Rather than trying to time the market, which is incredibly hard to do and often counterproductive, it can be helpful to remember that the attractive long-term returns to the stock market include many market crashes. Depending on your measurement criteria, time-period and exactly what index you look at well-diversified portfolio have averaged returns of around 6%-10% a year over time.
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