Real estate markets could collapse in coastal regions vulnerable to the effects of rising sea levels. The Union of Concerned Scientists predicts that 170 U.S. coastal cities and towns will be “chronically inundated” in 20 years. Another study found that 300,000 coastal properties will be flooded 26 times a year by 2045. The value of that real estate is $136 billion. By 2100, that number will rise to $1 trillion. At most risk are homes in Miami, New York's Long Island, and the San Francisco Bay area.
In 1987, you had an economy that was slowing from a rapid recovery, Treasury yields that were huge and falling, and an inflation rate that was running around 4%. Today, you have an economy that is just starting to boom, Treasury yields that are low and rising, and an inflation rate running around 2%. In other words, the economic conditions are starkly different.
For example, he quotes the very low average household net worth?s of households. Households 45 to 54 have less than $200,000 mean net worth. But when median net worth is taken into account for the same group, the number is closer to $700,000. Doesn't this support current home prices while at the same time highlighting a bigger issue, the widening diversity of haves and have-nots in America? Also, San Diego is presented as the least affordable housing, $379,000 average home vs. $60,000 average income. That's a great fact but does it take into account the large military population that is generally lowly paid but highly transient that may be more renter than buyer in that area? I theorize that these many people are lowering average household income while substantially not trying to purchase homes.
In this book, published in 2003, Talbott predicted a housing crash that would start around 2005. In fact, the peak of the housing market was the summer of 2005. It took longer for the fall in prices to take down the whole economy. Talbott explained in an easy-to-understand way why it was inevitable that housing prices would fall and crash the economy. The advice over what to do about it wasn't as good as the prediction.
Eighth, once a correction occurs, the risk of illiquidity and fire sales/undershooting will become more severe. There are reduced market-making and warehousing activities by broker-dealers. Excessive high-frequency/algorithmic trading will raise the likelihood of “flash crashes.” And fixed-income instruments have become more concentrated in open-ended exchange-traded and dedicated credit funds.
I’m ready, but nervous. IF, this is the big one, and you are wanting this or think you will pop some corn and enjoy the show, then you are unaware of the big picture. Yes it may be enjoyable for a while (I get no joy from this BTW), it WILL effect you in ways you haven’t yet thought of. Yes those of us that are prepared will weather it better than those not prepared, but this isn’t going to be fun in the long run.

There’s two camps on the 2019 crash issue. First those who see the unbelievable period of economic growth in the US and believe it has to end and who see the end of Free Trade as a forboding sign; and secondly, those who see only positive signals and the solid political footing of the Trump administration in its resolution to bring good paying jobs and industry back to the US.
Meanwhile, research and follow the companies on your list and get to know them well. Develop a strong understanding of just how they make their money, what their sustainable competitive advantages are, what their competition looks like, what their growth potential looks like, and how financially strong they are, such as in terms of cash and debt. When the market crashes, you'll be familiar with a bunch of companies and will have a sense of which are most compelling, growing most briskly and priced attractively. Monitoring your list regularly can help you notice when a company of interest, but not the overall market, falls in price significantly, presenting a possibly great buying opportunity.
Selling your home in 2018?  Should you sell your home and upgrade to a roomier one? Or perhaps you’ll be downsizing to a condo?  Condo sales boomed in 2017 and you’ll be competing hard for anything under $600k. Your Realtor will likely have to work a sophisticated marketing strategy to help you get your house sold and get you moved into a better one.
A bull market -- just like the one the U.S. stock market has experienced since 2009 -- happens when investors are optimistic about the markets and the economy, and when demand outpaces supply, thus driving up share prices. As bull markets peter out -- they can last anywhere from two years to nine years -- all it takes is a significant market event to create a crisis of confidence among investors and draw more sellers into the market. This can create a stock market crash that leads to a bear market.
Yes Bank share price on NSE fell as much as 31.7% to Rs 218.1, their steepest percentage plunge since January 2008, after the Reserve Bank of India asked CEO and MD Rana Kapoor asked to leave. According to a Reuters report, Jefferies has said that it does not subscribe to the view that without Kapoor there is no future for this systemically large bank, or that its financials have been cooked up. Yes Bank shareholders voted in June to extend Kapoor's term for three years, pending approval from the RBI. Earlier this week, late on Wednesday, the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) allowed Rana Kapoor to continue as CEO & MD till 31 January 2019.
The last week of January 2018 and the first week of February 2018, the Dow Jones dropped several hundred points. It looks to close out February 2 down hundreds of points, with other indexes (S&P 500, NASDAQ) to follow. While this may seem like a crisis, it is more than likely to reflect short-term investors taking their profits (in the long run up to this point) and shuffling them to other types of investments to prepare for improved bond yields.
By that year, Gutman wrote, "Video games were officially dead and computers were hot". He renamed his magazine Computer Games in October 1983, but "I noticed that the word games became a dirty word in the press. We started replacing it with simulations as often as possible". Soon "The computer slump began ... Suddenly, everyone was saying that the home computer was a fad, just another hula hoop". Computer Games published its last issue in late 1984.[13] In 1988, Computer Gaming World founder Russell Sipe noted that "the arcade game crash of 1984 took down the majority of the computer game magazines with it." He stated that, by "the winter of 1984, only a few computer game magazines remained," and by the summer of 1985, Computer Gaming World "was the only 4-color computer game magazine left."[20]
Hi Sadaf, Thanks and as you saw, the economy is fairly strong so towns well outside the GTA might be the best bet for a 2 year time frame. Check out Orillia. This is a town that never took off which is a shame because it’s right on the highway and Lake Couchiching, close to cottage country, and prices are low. They’ve remodeled the town park waterfront and it still has a nice small town feel. Here’s an example:https://www.royallepage.ca/en/property/ontario/orillia/120-dunlop-street/7142115/mls30615008/ of a house near the town. $300k is about as low as you’ll get. The Orillia housing market could take off as “stress tested out” homebuyers get desperate for an affordable home to buy further out from the GTA.
As a Young Family (married with one child) home buyer, we made a loss when we sold out to move to the Toronto area and currently rent. Our landlord is selling up a the Townhouses in our area have grown from $280,000 10 years ago to one just selling a few days ago for $630,000. Last month they were selling for $450,000. We now have no option but to continue renting and are now looking at the city for a Rental Condo (which is now cheaper than the 3 hour daily �suburb commute) . We didn’t even have the money to buy when it was worth $280,000. Our house hold income is around $80,000 a year. The reality is, the average Canadian has a debt load at a level even higher than the unsustainable US pre 2008 crash.

Since traditional statistical methods are perhaps less appropriate for extreme markets, other paths of examination may be more fruitful. For example the Santa Fe Institute is examining links between different disciplines. Potentially a market crash may have more in common with a growing pile of sand, than how the same market performs outside of a crash environment. When a grain of sand is added to an existing pile so the pile grows ever higher. Most of the time, one more grain will cause the pile to grow in height by a just fraction. However, at other times the addition of a single grain will lead to a collapse and in turn that collapse may be small, large or potentially even massive. Some researchers believe that better understanding these sorts of events hold the key for a better understanding of extreme market events, because today many traditional models simply fail to hold up.
If you could only listen to one person's advice during a stock market crash, let that person be famed investor, Warren Buffett. Not only will the Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-B) (NYSE: BRK-A) chairman and CEO's advice serve you well, but his knack for keeping a clear head -- and even getting a bit greedy (more on that later) -- when everyone else is selling, may make his the only advice you need to navigate uncertain times.

There are some people on this comment section who are so suffering from Trump Derangement Syndrome that they fail to see that Trump is the best thing our economy has seen since Ronald Reagan. Trump has been responsible for putting trillions of dollars to work in all of the important markets, such as the stock market and real estate. Economic growth has never been so high in the last twenty years, and unemployment is at record low levels. If certain commentators can get over TDS, perhaps they can see that the problems will occur if Democrats get elected. All the dems promise is higher taxes and more regulation, which means lower economic growth and lower values. However, it is not clear that even Trump can overcome rising interest rates. Over the years we have found that you cannot fight with the Fed. The fed can dominate other economic forces.
It's good to examine your overall portfolio regularly, to make sure it's structured as you want it to be and that you're holding the stocks you want in the proportions you want. For example, if one holding has grown far faster than others, it may now make up a very big portion of your portfolio. Ask yourself if that's OK, and consider paring back that position at least some, especially if the stock seems significantly overvalued. You don't want too many eggs in one basket.
It is well documented that prices tend to go up faster before a crash. This may seem counter-intuitive, but it makes sense in terms of “rational expectations.” For investors to remain invested in a market that is becoming more risky, prices have to rise faster in order to compensate for the growing probability of a crash. Otherwise, people would exit the market earlier and a bubble would never form.

That being said, the Buffett Indicator, while it's not a flawless indicator, does tend to peak during hot stock markets and bottom during weak markets. And as a general rule, if the indicator falls below 80%-90% or so, it has historically signaled that stocks are cheap. On the other hand, levels significantly higher than 100% can indicate stocks are expensive.
The 1987 Crash was a worldwide phenomenon. The FTSE 100 Index lost 10.8% on that Monday and a further 12.2% the following day. In the month of October, all major world markets declined substantially. The least affected was Austria (a fall of 11.4%) while the most affected was Hong Kong with a drop of 45.8%. Out of 23 major industrial countries, 19 had a decline greater than 20%.[28]

During 1930 and 1931 in particular, unemployed workers went on strike, demonstrated in public, and otherwise took direct action to call public attention to their plight. Within the UK, protests often focused on the so-called Means Test, which the government had instituted in 1931 as a way to limit the amount of unemployment payments made to individuals and families. For working people, the Means Test seemed an intrusive and insensitive way to deal with the chronic and relentless deprivation caused by the economic crisis. The strikes were met forcefully, with police breaking up protests, arresting demonstrators, and charging them with crimes related to the violation of public order.[39]
During the mid- to late 1920s, the stock market in the United States underwent rapid expansion. It continued for the first six months following President Herbert Hoover’s inauguration in January 1929. The prices of stocks soared to fantastic heights in the great “Hoover bull market,” and the public, from banking and industrial magnates to chauffeurs and cooks, rushed to brokers to invest their surplus or their savings in securities, which they could sell at a profit. Billions of dollars were drawn from the banks into Wall Street for brokers’ loans to carry margin accounts. The spectacles of the South Sea Bubble and the Mississippi Bubble had returned. People sold their Liberty Bonds and mortgaged their homes to pour their cash into the stock market. In the midsummer of 1929 some 300 million shares of stock were being carried on margin, pushing the Dow Jones Industrial Average to a peak of 381 points in September. Any warnings of the precarious foundations of this financial house of cards went unheeded.

With the bankers' financial resources behind him, Whitney placed a bid to purchase a large block of shares in U.S. Steel at a price well above the current market. As traders watched, Whitney then placed similar bids on other "blue chip" stocks. This tactic was similar to one that had ended the Panic of 1907. It succeeded in halting the slide. The Dow Jones Industrial Average recovered, closing with it down only 6.38 points for the day. The rally continued on Friday, October 25, and the half day session on Saturday the 26th but, unlike 1907, the respite was only temporary.
According to The Economic Times, as many as 41 stocks on the Nifty are in the red, with Eicher Motors, Reliance Industries, Tech Mahindra, TCS and GAIL falling 2-5 per cent. Of course, some companies bucked the trend, like Yes Bank, Larsen & Toubro, Tata Steel and Vedanta, which advanced 0.53-2.11 per cent, but the mood in the market is decidedly cautious ahead of the Monetary Policy Committee's (MPC) decision on the fourth bi-monthly monetary policy. The pundits are all predicting a repo rate hike - the third this year - to be announced tomorrow.

There's always a chance that the sell-off can morph into a decline of 10 percent or more from the market's September peak, which could thrust the market into its second so-called price correction of the year, Zaccarelli says. Still, he predicts that any downturn won't become a bear market, or 20 percent drop, and will instead turn out to be a good buying opportunity for investors with time to ride out any storm.
As you can see from the numbers Dennis has on the housing market, things are much better than they were before the last crash. Lending guidelines are much tougher no matter what you hear. I see posts on Facebook all the time about how people can get low-money-down loans now, and that means the housing crash is coming. Low-money-down loans have been available for decades, and that is not what caused the housing crash. Really bad loans to people who should not buy houses is what caused the housing crisis. Those loans do not exist anymore, as you can see by the data Dennis provided. Yes, it is possible to get a loan with less than a 600 credit score, but very few people are actually getting those loans. When you look at the housing market, you need to look at the real numbers of how many houses are being built, what kind of loans people are getting, and how much house people can afford. Houses are not being built like they were before. The loans people are getting are much higher quality, and the market is much more stable than it was before.
Yes Bank was sharply down nearly 30% on Friday after being as much as 34% down at one point of time. Volumes were sharply higher on Friday indicating some concerted institutional selling on the stock. The stock was downgraded by a slew of brokers after the RBI refused to allow Rana Kapoor to continue as the CEO of the bank after January 2018. The RBI has been quite choosy about permitting CEOs to continue and even in the case of Axis Bank the RBI had actually compelled Shikha Sharma to move on after December. This had a spill-off effect across the banking stocks as the BSE Bank index corrected as much as 3.5% in a single day.
As we mark the 10th anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, there are still ongoing debates about the causes and consequences of the financial crisis, and whether the lessons needed to prepare for the next one have been absorbed. But looking ahead, the more relevant question is what actually will trigger the next global recession and crisis, and when.
In other words, bear markets are part of investing. You can’t avoid them – but you can make sure a bear market doesn’t wipe you out. Rule number one is to diversify, and periodically rebalance your portfolio. When a correction, stock market crash or bear market comes along, the stocks that fall the most are those that are trading at the highest valuations, those with the most debt, and those with the lowest margins.
The NASDAQ released their timeline of the anomalies during U.S. Congressional House Subcommittee on Capital Markets and Government-Sponsored Enterprises[73] hearings on the flash crash.[2] NASDAQ's timeline indicates that NYSE Arca may have played an early role and that the Chicago Board Options Exchange sent a message saying that NYSE Arca was "out of NBBO" (National best bid and offer). The Chicago Board Options Exchange, NASDAQ, NASDAQ OMX BX and BATS Exchange all declared self-help against NYSE Arca.[2]
No definitive conclusions have been reached on the reasons behind the 1987 Crash. Stocks had been in a multi-year bull run and market P/E ratios in the U.S. were above the post-war average. The S&P 500 was trading at 23 times earnings, a postwar high and well above the average of 14.5 times earnings.[29] Herd behavior and psychological feedback loops play a critical part in all stock market crashes but analysts have also tried to look for external triggering events. Aside from the general worries of stock market overvaluation, blame for the collapse has been apportioned to such factors as program trading, portfolio insurance and derivatives, and prior news of worsening economic indicators (i.e. a large U.S. merchandise trade deficit and a falling U.S. dollar, which seemed to imply future interest rate hikes).[30]

The 10-year Treasury note – whose key rate impacts the pricing on things ranging from fixed-rate mortgages to stocks to virtually every financial asset on the planet – recently climbed above 3.25 percent for the first time since May 2011. And when you add the threat of higher borrowing costs on things such as houses and cars and corporate debt to the economic obstacles caused by the U.S. trade war with China, all it takes is a whiff of weakness to set a major sell-off in motion.
Mati Greenspan, an analyst with the trading platform eToro, told Business Insider on Tuesday that volumes from Japan and South Korea had been tailing off in recent days. Traders in these markets are usually buyers, and a large-scale exit could have created an imbalance in the market, with more sellers than buyers driving down prices and sparking a panic.
This crisis is rooted in the failure to learn the lessons of 2008 and of every other recession since the Fed’s creation: A secretive central bank should not be allowed to manipulate interest rates and distort economic signals regarding market conditions. Such action leads to malinvestment and an explosion of individual, business, and government debt. This may cause a temporary boom, but the boom soon will be followed by a bust. The only way this cycle can be broken without a major crisis is for Congress both to restore people’s right to use the currency of their choice and to audit and then end the Fed.
Real estate leads for realtors in Los Angeles, Toronto, Montreal, San Diego, Phoenix, Denver, Seattle, Chicago, Boston, New York, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, St Louis, Minneapolis, Green Bay, Charlotte, Tampa, Miami, Orlando, Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa, Oshawa, Hamilton, Newmarket, Aurora, Richmond Hill,  Calgary, Kelowna, Mississauga, Anaheim, Beverly Hills, Malibu, San Francisco, San Jose, and many more cities across North America. 
Despite the dangers of speculation, it was widely believed that the stock market would continue to rise forever. On March 25, 1929, after the Federal Reserve warned of excessive speculation, a mini crash occurred as investors started to sell stocks at a rapid pace, exposing the market's shaky foundation.[6] Two days later, banker Charles E. Mitchell announced that his company, the National City Bank, would provide $25 million in credit to stop the market's slide.[6] Mitchell's move brought a temporary halt to the financial crisis, and call money declined from 20 to 8 percent.[6] However, the American economy showed ominous signs of trouble:[6] steel production declined, construction was sluggish, automobile sales went down, and consumers were building up high debts because of easy credit.[6] Despite all these economic trouble signs and the market breaks in March and May 1929, stocks resumed their advance in June and the gains continued almost unabated until early September 1929 (the Dow Jones average gained more than 20% between June and September). The market had been on a nine-year run that saw the Dow Jones Industrial Average increase in value tenfold, peaking at 381.17 on September 3, 1929.[6] Shortly before the crash, economist Irving Fisher famously proclaimed, "Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[7] The optimism and financial gains of the great bull market were shaken after a well publicized early September prediction from financial expert Roger Babson that "a crash was coming".[citation needed] The initial September decline was thus called the "Babson Break" in the press. This was the start of the Great Crash, although until the severe phase of the crash in October, many investors regarded the September "Babson Break" as a "healthy correction" and buying opportunity.[citation needed]
The trade-sensitive industrial stocks led the Dow Jones Industrial Average to a record closing high on Thursday, the last of Wall Street's main indexes to fully regain ground since a correction that began in January with all three major US indexes finishing higher as trade worries subsided. Microsoft Corp and Apple Inc rose 1.7% and 0.8%, respectively. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 251.22 points, or 0.95% to 26,656.98, the S&P 500 gained 22.8 points, or 0.78% to 2,930.75 and the Nasdaq Composite added 78.19 points, or 0.98% to 8,028.23.

The latest round of US/China tariffs had been long flagged and both the US increase (10% on US$200 billion of imports from China, but not yet 25%) and China’s less than proportional retaliation (5-10% on US$60 billion of imports) were less than feared. This, along with reports China is planning a broad cut to its tariffs, was positive and leaves scope for negotiations. More significantly, we are still a long way from a full-blown trade war. After implementation of the latest round, only about 12% of US imports will be subject to increased tariffs and the average tariff increase across all imports will be just 1.6% - implying about a 0.2% boost to inflation and a less than 0.2% hit to growth. In China, the economic impact is likely to be less than 0.5% of GDP. This is all a long way from 1930 when the US levied a 20% tariff hike on all imports and other countries did the same making the depression “great”.


In finance, Black Monday refers to Monday, October 19, 1987, when stock markets around the world crashed. The crash began in Hong Kong and spread west to Europe, hitting the United States after other markets had already sustained significant declines. The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell exactly 508 points to 1,738.74 (22.61%).[1] In Australia and New Zealand, the 1987 crash is also referred to as "Black Tuesday" because of the time zone difference.
Network snapshots before (left) and during (right) the simulated flash crash. The last 400 transactions in the order-book are plotted by connecting the HFT agents who transact with each other. The node color indicates the inventory size of the HFT agent. When the market operates normally (left subplot), almost all of the HFT agents are in control of their inventory (greenish color). In crash period (right), most of the HFT agents gain large inventories (red) and the network is highly interconnected: over 85 percent of the transactions are HFT-HFT.[51]
On Black Monday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 38.33 points to 260, a drop of 12.8%. The deluge of selling overwhelmed the ticker tape system that normally gave investors the current prices of their shares. Telephone lines and telegraphs were clogged and were unable to cope. This information vacuum only led to more fear and panic. The technology of the New Era, previously much celebrated by investors, now served to deepen their suffering.
Whether Professor Sornette is right or not that a critical point can be anticipated, the entire concept of market self-organization deals a blow to the “fundamental” approach to investing in equity markets – the idea that opinion-based research can lead to investment success when it seems quite apparent that outcomes cannot be predicted even when initial conditions are known.
The absurd result of valuable stocks being executed for a penny likely was attributable to the use of a practice called "stub quoting." When a market order is submitted for a stock, if available liquidity has already been taken out, the market order will seek the next available liquidity, regardless of price. When a market maker’s liquidity has been exhausted, or if it is unwilling to provide liquidity, it may at that time submit what is called a stub quote—for example, an offer to buy a given stock at a penny. A stub quote is essentially a place holder quote because that quote would never—it is thought—be reached. When a market order is seeking liquidity and the only liquidity available is a penny-priced stub quote, the market order, by its terms, will execute against the stub quote. In this respect, automated trading systems will follow their coded logic regardless of outcome, while human involvement likely would have prevented these orders from executing at absurd prices. As noted below, we are reviewing the practice of displaying stub quotes that are never intended to be executed.
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Market collapses can really hurt older investors. A stock market collapse can inflict damage across the board, demographically, but the impact on older Americans is especially onerous. Think of a 67-year-old retiree whose assets are largely tied up in the stock market: The value of those assets plummets after a market crash. While a 25-year-old has plenty of time to rebuild portfolio assets, a 67-year-old does not, and doesn't have the needed income any longer to even play "catch up" in the stock market.

Hi Christine, I can’t offer advice. There is a lot of risk in 2020. Trudeau may botch the trade negotiations and that could could start a Toronto slide. Without the auto sector, Whitby and Oshawa could get hit hard. Good thing is Trudeau could be gone next year and the Americans might listen to a new conservative government. Harper’s already visited the back door at the white house. From here to 2020 could be rough in Canada. Good luck with your sale.


Right now, Republicans have control of the legislative branch of the U.S. government, albeit by a slim margin in the Senate. Having a majority of seats in both houses of Congress, and a Republican President in Donald Trump, increases the probability of legislation being passed. Not to mention, the GOP is often viewed as a party that’s friendlier to businesses. This Republican majority is responsible for passing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in December 2017, which slashed the peak marginal corporate income tax rate to 21% from 35%.
Spread your risk. Having a well-designed mix of investments is a great idea anytime, but especially so in a down market. That's because you don't take a pounding by having all your eggs in one potentially leaky basket. Studies show that holding a judicious mix of growth and value stocks, possibly in international as well as U.S. companies, and some bonds and cash investments too, is a great way to minimize investment loss.
i would completely disagree with you on the lending to people who should not have gotten loans part. I was a person who got a loan during that time. I made all my payments, but it was a stated income loan with almost no verification of income. I basically said I want to buy a house for this much and they said okay. Things are so much different now.
Stock markets dropped today as trading closed with the DOW down 500 points more. The NASDAQ fell a further 70 points and and S&P about 30 points. There’s a lot of guessing as to what’s happening such as pessimistic earnings season reports, China trade worries, and multinational corporate performance (cheap labor market access) in doubt going forward as 2019 nears.
Unemployment is near record lows. Corporations are bringing money from offshore accounts back into the U.S. Technology is driving thousands of new innovations. Of course, none of these conditions for prosperity will last forever, and there's certainly pockets of the U.S. still experiencing job loss and poverty. I loath being a cheerleader for stocks or the economy, but it's not as bad as it seems.
So, the way to prepare for a market crash is not necessarily to artfully predict in advance, and step aside when the crash comes. That's virtually impossible. Rather, it can be useful to consider your overall investment strategy ahead of time, so that you know you could stomach the next inevitable crash when it comes. Ideally, through proper diversification and forethought you'll have an investment approach that will enable you to ride out a crash, rather than turning you into another panicked seller. If you only act on these issues when the crash comes, it will likely be too late.
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