In March 2017, William Poole, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, warned of another subprime crisis. He warned that 35 percent of Fannie Mae's loans required mortgage insurance. That's about the level in 2006. In some ways, these loans are worse. Fannie and Freddie lowered their definition of subprime from 660 to 620. The banks are no longer calling borrowers with scores between 620 and 660 subprime. Poole was the head of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas who warned of the subprime crisis in 2005.
Real estate markets could collapse in coastal regions vulnerable to the effects of rising sea levels. The Union of Concerned Scientists predicts that 170 U.S. coastal cities and towns will be “chronically inundated” in 20 years. Another study found that 300,000 coastal properties will be flooded 26 times a year by 2045. The value of that real estate is $136 billion. By 2100, that number will rise to $1 trillion. At most risk are homes in Miami, New York's Long Island, and the San Francisco Bay area.

Unfortunately, the Fed is fallible, just like stock market investors. If inflation -- i.e., the rising price of goods and services -- begins to heat up, the nation’s central bank could choose to get considerably more hawkish with its monetary policy. Or, in plainer English, it could get more aggressive with hiking its benchmark short-term interest rate between banks. Should that happen, interest rates for variable rate loans and mortgages would be expected to rise. This, in turn, could put the brakes on economic growth, as well as increase delinquency rates tied to variable rate loans.
“The kingdom affirms its total rejection of any threats and attempts to undermine it, whether by threatening to impose economic sanctions, using political pressures or repeating false accusations,” the government said  in a statement released to Saudi media. “The Kingdom also affirms that if it receives any action, it will respond with greater action.”
In putting this into practice today, let’s assume we have $100,000 invested in equities currently so we need to buy $500 in 2-month put options (0.5% of $100,000) that are 30% below the current underlying price. SPY trades at 219.4 as I write this so $154 is about 30% beneath this price. A small segment of the October 21 put options chain is below (from Yahoo!Finance). Looking at the ask prices and volume it looks like the 155 puts are a bit more liquid and better priced than the 154 puts. At $9 each (9c times 100 shares) we can buy 55 of the October 155 put options for $495.
This guideline has one exception: a stock market crash. If the market as a whole, measured by all three major indexes, loses hundreds of points (multiple percentage points), there's generally been a shock to the system, such as 9/11 or an unexpected political development or absolutely terrible economic news, such as the collapse of a major currency. In recent memory, bugs in automated, algorithmic trading have caused smaller crashes.
Currently, the U.S. stock market is in the midst of one of the longest bull markets in its history. Since bottoming out in March 2009, the broad-based S&P 500 (INDEX: ^GSPC), led by a strong rally in technology stocks and other growth industries, has surged by more than 325%! Mind you, the stock market has historically returned 7% a year, inclusive of dividend reinvestment and adjusted for inflation. So, to say that things are going well right now would be an understatement.
And just when you think that this may all be a bunch of bul…h…t. A free energy inventer gets a phone call from a Tv morning show, calling him raising hell on his ass telling him, that he needs to buy up all the free energy electrical devices now, the free energy inventor declines his offer, Host hangs up on him pissed and then calls him back asking him nicely if he could allow him to send him a truck to empty his entire store inventory, the owner declines. Store owner inventor is told by said talk show host, that the elites are getting everything in place to plug the plug. Its obvious that its a planned calapse. The inventor tells us that we will be needing electicity to power up devices, because he was told that the grid will go down, and obvious planned EMP ATTACK on all our major cites, “planned” it seems.
Now started the preparations for reforms to revive the market and pull it out from the huge crisis. The first and foremost reform that was suggested was the uniformity of the margin requirements. This was done so that the volatility of the stocks, stock options and index features could be reduced. Also, the installation of new computer systems was suggested so that the market could be pulled out from these difficult times as soon as possible. These computer systems that were newly installed in the stock exchanges needed just a single keystroke to enter the trade. Earlier this work would be tiresome and needed almost 25 keystrokes. These new computer systems rejected the trade if a wrong input was made. Those ways these computers helped increase the efficiency of data management. They also helped to minimize errors and maximize productivity. Overall these new computer systems were helping to manage the data with much ease decreasing chances of mistakes to a great extent.
In the 694 days between 11 January 1973 and 6 December 1974, the New York Stock Exchange's Dow Jones Industrial Average benchmark suffered the seventh-worst bear market in its history, losing over 45% of its value.[2] 1972 had been a good year for the DJIA, with gains of 15% in the twelve months. 1973 had been expected to be even better, with Time magazine reporting just 3 days before the crash began that it was 'shaping up as a gilt-edged year'.[3] In the two years from 1972 to 1974, the American economy slowed from 7.2% real GDP growth to −2.1% contraction, while inflation (by CPI) jumped from 3.4% in 1972 to 12.3% in 1974.[1]
Brexit is another issue that continues to wax and wane. Lately the risks of a “no deal” or “hard Brexit”, which risk throwing the UK into recession, have shot up again. The EU rejection of the British Government’s Brexit plan with the “four freedoms” and the Irish border remain sticking points and time is running out. It’s still too early to take a bullish British pound bet.
This is especially true for income-focused stocks, such as real estate investment trusts (REITs). Investors buy these stocks specifically for their dividend yields, and rising market interest rates put downward pressure on these stocks. As a simplified illustration, if a 10-year Treasury note yields 3% and a certain REIT yields 5%, it may seem worth the extra risk to income-seeking investors to choose the REIT.
As we mark the 10th anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, there are still ongoing debates about the causes and consequences of the financial crisis, and whether the lessons needed to prepare for the next one have been absorbed. But looking ahead, the more relevant question is what actually will trigger the next global recession and crisis, and when.
After October 29, 1929, stock prices had nowhere to go but up, so there was considerable recovery during succeeding weeks. Overall, however, prices continued to drop as the United States slumped into the Great Depression, and by 1932 stocks were worth only about 20 percent of their value in the summer of 1929. The stock market crash of 1929 was not the sole cause of the Great Depression, but it did act to accelerate the global economic collapse of which it was also a symptom. By 1933, nearly half of America’s banks had failed, and unemployment was approaching 15 million people, or 30 percent of the workforce.
I live in a housing bubble market with everyone attempting to buy at sky high prices. I bought 4.5 years ago, and am looking at selling for over a 100% gain in that amount of time. Yes attempting to sit on the sidelines waiting for the market to change may not seem the best, but rather than being intent on jumping back into the poker game because you like the action, take your earnings off the table. Markets can remain irrational for exuberant amounts of time, but you have to weigh it out. At the moment a 30% retrace would mean I lose $140,000 worth of equity currently available. I’ll rather that liquidity in the bank any day over paying the mortgage of an asset still owned by a lender, which to me is a liability.
Some of these motivations come from people all following each other, trying to predict the exact economic actions of other people all engaged in the same activity. (People who bought a stock at too high a price are looking for greater fools to unload it on.) While the market's open, everyone's trying to figure out the optimal value for the price of every stock everywhere. It's exhausting to think about the trillion or so variables that go into that immense labor of capitalism. It's crazy to consider how complicated the chains of cause and effect and overthinking are.
Share Market Live: Indian stock markets (Sensex and Nifty) closed lower on Friday facing a knee-jerk reaction in the intraday deals with Sensex closing 280 points lower and Nifty slipping below 11,150. During the day, a market-wide sell-off was seen in stocks with the benchmark Sensex plummetting 1,128 points and Nifty tripping below 10,900. Shares of Yes Bank, collapsed 34% intraday, settled down 29% while DHFL shares ended down 42% after nosediving 60% intraday.
Bond strategists have been warning that the second half of September could bring a slight jump in yields because pension funds have been loading up on Treasurys and other bonds before the Sept. 15 deadline for a change in tax laws for corporate sponsors of funds. They believe that buying has depressed yields, which move opposite prices, and the end of those purchases could send yields higher.
I agree with the first posting. Interesting synopsis of the real estate market but your support of trump is really misplaced. He is a liar and cannot be trusted in ANYTHING he does. The 90s under Clinton and the GOP congress was the best economic expansion in our country’s history, period. Opportunity everywhere. Taxes were high, but we were more balanced. The Obama years were more about the Tea Party than anything. And guess what. Unless Trump solves this dilemma, he’s done and we’re done too. The FED is the only thing that has kept us from roiling over the edge for the last 8+ years. And I’m guessing under Trump after a few years of super heating the economy again, like under Way, we’ll be looking at another speculative crash. Why? Because the GOP has sold us down the river. NO? Everything in our lives now reflects business and speculative interests? Who benefits? Gee I don’t know. Maybe rich people that can speculate on everything that touches us. Time to leave. You stay in the game and keep preaching growth instead of stability. Let’s see how it all works out.
The latest round of US/China tariffs had been long flagged and both the US increase (10% on US$200 billion of imports from China, but not yet 25%) and China’s less than proportional retaliation (5-10% on US$60 billion of imports) were less than feared. This, along with reports China is planning a broad cut to its tariffs, was positive and leaves scope for negotiations. More significantly, we are still a long way from a full-blown trade war. After implementation of the latest round, only about 12% of US imports will be subject to increased tariffs and the average tariff increase across all imports will be just 1.6% - implying about a 0.2% boost to inflation and a less than 0.2% hit to growth. In China, the economic impact is likely to be less than 0.5% of GDP. This is all a long way from 1930 when the US levied a 20% tariff hike on all imports and other countries did the same making the depression “great”.
Technical correction - Market trends doesn’t go up successively higher, instead it moves like a set of waves taking two steps forward and one step backward. The recent selloff can be perceived as a backward step ! It’s a term in technical analysis, Traders attempt to study market trends using technical analysis, which means using price charts and graphs to make investment or trading decisions on stock market
The May 6, 2010, Flash Crash,[1][2] also known as the Crash of 2:45, the 2010 Flash Crash or simply the Flash Crash, was a United States trillion-dollar[3] stock market crash, which started at 2:32 p.m. EDT and lasted for approximately 36 minutes.[4]:1 Stock indexes, such as the S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq Composite, collapsed and rebounded very rapidly.[4] The Dow Jones Industrial Average had its second biggest intraday point drop (from the opening) up to that point,[4] plunging 998.5 points (about 9%), most within minutes, only to recover a large part of the loss.[5][6] It was also the second-largest intraday point swing (difference between intraday high and intraday low) up to that point, at 1,010.14 points.[4][5][7][8] The prices of stocks, stock index futures, options and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) were volatile, thus trading volume spiked.[4]:3 A CFTC 2014 report described it as one of the most turbulent periods in the history of financial markets.[4]:1

Last week when we were closing on our house- we were selling-, we were told there was a delay earlier in the day. All house sales and money transactions go through the federal reserve. Luckily it came back up, we sold and “pocketed” our gains in the bank. Now what to do with it!!! I am not sure it is safe in the bank, talking $260,000. We want to move to middle, southern Tn. Living in an apartment till my daughter graduates. Any ideas?
Interest rates are another important factor to consider. The Fed has only raised interest rates one half of a percent, but actual mortgage rates have come back down. That said, rates could eventually rise, so it’s wise for investors to prepare a strategy for when that occurs as it can impact their ability to finance an investment portfolio. Update: Mortgage rates have started to rise as the Fed continues to increase rates.
Technical glitches: An analysis of trading on the exchanges during the moments immediately prior to the flash crash reveals technical glitches in the reporting of prices on the NYSE and various alternative trading systems (ATSs) that might have contributed to the drying up of liquidity. According to this theory, technical problems at the NYSE led to delays as long as five minutes in NYSE quotes being reported on the Consolidated Quotation System (CQS) with time stamps indicating that the quotes were current. However, some market participants (those with access to NYSE's own quote reporting system, OpenBook) could see both correct current NYSE quotes, as well as the delayed but apparently current CQS quotes. At the same time, there were errors in the prices of some stocks (Apple Inc., Sothebys, and some ETFs). Confused and uncertain about prices, many market participants attempted to drop out of the market by posting stub quotes (very low bids and very high offers) and, at the same time, many high-frequency trading algorithms attempted to exit the market with market orders (which were executed at the stub quotes) leading to a domino effect that resulted in the flash crash plunge.[37][38]
Another thing you can do if you're anticipating a market crash is to include a bunch of defensive stocks in your portfolio, as they tend to get less punished during a market downturn. Defensive stocks belong to companies whose fortunes aren't very tied to the economy's movements. For example, people might put off buying refrigerators or cars during a recession, but they'll still buy groceries, socks, soaps, gas, medicine, electricity and diapers. Thus, food, tobacco, energy, and pharmaceuticals are some defensive industries, seen as more stable than their "cyclical" counterparts, such as the homebuilding, steel, automobile, and airline industries. You don't have to avoid cyclical industries in your investing, but know that they can move sharply in relationship to the economy.
The first microcomputers such as the Altair 8800 and Apple I were marketed to a niche of electronics hobbyists as most required assembly from a kit. In 1977, factory-assembled machines with BASIC in ROM became available, including the "Trio of '77": the Apple II, Commodore PET, and TRS-80 Model I. The latter two retailed for under $1,000, but lacked game joysticks and high-resolution color video.[5] Third-party developers created games for all of these platforms. The TRS-80 benefited from Radio Shack's retail stores, which displayed computers and accessories locally in an era where many personal computers were mail-ordered from manufacturers.
The latest round of US/China tariffs had been long flagged and both the US increase (10% on US$200 billion of imports from China, but not yet 25%) and China’s less than proportional retaliation (5-10% on US$60 billion of imports) were less than feared. This, along with reports China is planning a broad cut to its tariffs, was positive and leaves scope for negotiations. More significantly, we are still a long way from a full-blown trade war. After implementation of the latest round, only about 12% of US imports will be subject to increased tariffs and the average tariff increase across all imports will be just 1.6% - implying about a 0.2% boost to inflation and a less than 0.2% hit to growth. In China, the economic impact is likely to be less than 0.5% of GDP. This is all a long way from 1930 when the US levied a 20% tariff hike on all imports and other countries did the same making the depression “great”.
Solid advice, but investors should broaden their horizons to encompass digital currency, as the fallacy of global fiat currency is insane in the social media world we live in today.  Trust in the government is eroding, as is the reporting needed to only use a dollar denominated unit of measure in a world where block chain and liquid, easy to use Bitcoins are in your digital wallet and you can buy anything from an airline ticket to a car on auction on eBay.
“Investing is the attempt to make a financial killing, in other words, bigger profits and less work. Why else would anyone with their head on straignt want to make a profit on the backs of others? Thousands of years ago it was determined by one nation that debts should be forgiven every 7 years. Lending money with large interest rates was unfair. It’s in Egyptian and Abrahamic history.”

The stock market crash of 1929 – considered the worst economic event in world history – began on Thursday, October 24, 1929, with skittish investors trading a record 12.9 million shares. On October 28, dubbed “Black Monday,” the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged nearly 13 percent. The market fell another 12 percent the next day, “Black Tuesday.” While the crisis send shock waves across the financial world, there were numerous signs that a stock market crash was coming. What exactly caused the crash – and could it have been prevented?


"We don't know who is to blame here; it's a little like trying to find what or who is responsible for the dangerous hurricane in Florida today," says Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at MUFG, a Tokyo-based global bank with offices in New York. "But make no mistake about it, the stock market decline, triggered perhaps by rising bond yields, is just as dangerous."

Maybe Coca-Cola announced record earnings. Maybe it's the middle of the month, and your 401(k) contribution has just come out of your paycheck, so you automatically bought a fund or individual stocks. Maybe you've just retired, and you'd like to take 40 years of profits to pay off your mortgage, so you're selling some stocks. Maybe a stock hasn't gone anywhere for you, and you don't mind taking a little loss for the tax break. Maybe you found a bargain and you just can't wait to snap up a few shares. Maybe it's a stock bubble or stock valuations are running high.
Oil futures inched up on Friday amid concerns over supply as U.S. sanctions on Iran's crude exports loom, although calls by U.S. President Donald Trump for lower oil prices dragged, a Reuters report said. Brent crude for November delivery was up 26 cents, or 0.33%, at $78.96 a barrel while US West Texas Intermediate crude for October delivery was up 7 cents, or 0.10%, at $70.39 a barrel, the report added. 

When legions of investors try to sell, that causes further panic in the markets, and can lead to investment companies issuing "margin calls" -- calling in money lent to investors so they can buy stocks and funds -- which forces those investors to sell at current (usually low) prices to get their cash reserves to satisfactory levels to meet those demands. Over the decades, many investors have gone bust over stock market crashes --when supply trumps demand and there are more sellers than buyers.


Stock market crashes are usually caused by more than one factor. In fact, there are often two sets of reasons for a crash. One set of conditions creates the environment for the sell-off, and another set of factors triggers the beginning of the sell-off. Just because there is a market bubble, it doesn’t mean the market will crash. Usually something needs to occur to cause investors to begin selling and buyers to step away from the stock market.

With IL&FS getting closer to an absolute liquidity crunch and defaulting on its ICDs and CPs, the RBI has started tightening the vigilance on banks and other financial institutions. For starters, the RBI asked banks to be cautious about buying HFC bonds considering their exposure to IL&FS debt. IL&FS has outstanding debt to the tune of $12.5 billion and the market is rife with news that most of the HFCs have large exposure to IL&FS debt. Of course, the promoters of Indiabulls and DHFL have denied any exposure but the news refuses to go away. The mood was also sourced by a large Indian mutual fund selling DHFL bonds in the market at an above-market yield of almost 11%. That also took its toll on the markets.
Hey DK. Since your brain is pegged to the 4th dimension. The $30 K I lost was back in 2002 when the dot com blew. I was making $90 K a year. Like spilled beer. Did not affect me. I was trading $20 K blocks at a time day trading. Its called the market maker, making the stock move. These are things you could only dream of. You cant even understand foreign exchange. The Yuan is not pegged to the dollar as you claim. You should stick to simple shit like beans and bullets. Economics is beyond you…

A market collapse can wipe out what economists call "paper wealth." Paper wealth is money tied up in investments like the stock market or the real estate market that could be sold for a gain, but hasn't yet. In contrast, "real wealth" refers to actual, physical assets, like the money in your bank account, or a vehicle you own that is fully paid off and can be sold for a definite financial gain.

Another thing you can do if you're anticipating a market crash is to include a bunch of defensive stocks in your portfolio, as they tend to get less punished during a market downturn. Defensive stocks belong to companies whose fortunes aren't very tied to the economy's movements. For example, people might put off buying refrigerators or cars during a recession, but they'll still buy groceries, socks, soaps, gas, medicine, electricity and diapers. Thus, food, tobacco, energy, and pharmaceuticals are some defensive industries, seen as more stable than their "cyclical" counterparts, such as the homebuilding, steel, automobile, and airline industries. You don't have to avoid cyclical industries in your investing, but know that they can move sharply in relationship to the economy.
Free movement of people was only one aspect of why people voted to leave the eu. There is another even more pressing, that of regaining sovereignty given away by those who thought nothing of betraying it in the first place. Yes the Gov. could be brought down by the latest betrayal of sovereignty, not only the Gov but the Tory Party itself, with no chance of a come back for decades to come, if ever.
That was six years ago. Funnily enough, the author of this blog, David Haggith, recently posted an article titled I Bet My Blog on a 2018 Economic Collapse. Basically, he is going to throw sh*t at the wall until something finally sticks – then he’ll pontificate to everyone about how his prediction was correct. It is worth noting that he also predicted that 2016 would be the year of the economic apocalypse and that he was “fairly sure” that stocks would slump in January, 2017.
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