In 1932, the Pecora Commission was established by the U.S. Senate to study the causes of the crash. The following year, the U.S. Congress passed the Glass–Steagall Act mandating a separation between commercial banks, which take deposits and extend loans, and investment banks, which underwrite, issue, and distribute stocks, bonds, and other securities.

You Marxist piece of shit. What the hell do you think the entire banking industry is based on. Should we throw our money at each other, hoping someone else reciprocates so we don’t have to eat discarded baby fetus? Interest is necessary to compensate for risk, which you would have known if you took your head out of Hegel’s ass and learned some basic financial theory. These subprime loans were the riskiest fucking things on the market, but they were rated AAA. Don’t fucking crucify bankers for being goddamn rational human beings while you complain about society passing you goodbye. Get off the fucking Communist high road and realize some shit about the world and how it works.

As a case in point, I present to you subprime auto loans, or loans given to consumers with less-than-prime credit scores (usually 550 to 619 on the FICO score scale). Having a lower credit score typically gives these folks fewer lending options, which allows lenders that are willing to work with subprime consumers to charge a notably higher interest rate, relative to prime-rated consumers. The problem is these consumers usually have subpar credit scores for a reason, and delinquency rates on these subprime and deep subprime loans are shooting higher.


After a one-day recovery on October 30, where the Dow regained an additional 28.40 points, or 12 percent, to close at 258.47, the market continued to fall, arriving at an interim bottom on November 13, 1929, with the Dow closing at 198.60. The market then recovered for several months, starting on November 14, with the Dow gaining 18.59 points to close at 217.28, and reaching a secondary closing peak (i.e., bear market rally) of 294.07 on April 17, 1930. The following year, the Dow embarked on another, much longer, steady slide from April 1931 to July 8, 1932, when it closed at 41.22—its lowest level of the 20th century, concluding an 89 percent loss rate for all of the market's stocks.
Jones is widely credited with predicting, and profiting, from the stock-market crash on Oct. 19, 1987, which saw the Dow lose nearly 23% of its value, marking the largest one-day percentage decline for the blue-chip benchmark in its history. Jones founded Tudor in 1980 and became known for trading everything from currencies to commodities. His record has featured middling returns and an exodus of billions from his hedge fund in more recent years. According to a Forbes list of billionaires, Jones boasts a net worth of $4.7 billion
×