The trade-sensitive industrial stocks led the Dow Jones Industrial Average to a record closing high on Thursday, the last of Wall Street's main indexes to fully regain ground since a correction that began in January with all three major US indexes finishing higher as trade worries subsided. Microsoft Corp and Apple Inc rose 1.7% and 0.8%, respectively. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 251.22 points, or 0.95% to 26,656.98, the S&P 500 gained 22.8 points, or 0.78% to 2,930.75 and the Nasdaq Composite added 78.19 points, or 0.98% to 8,028.23.
The S&P 500 ended 1999 at  1,469 and was recently at 2,814. That's an increase of 92% -- almost doubling -- over the nearly 19 years represented in the table, and it represents an average annual gain of about 3.5%. That's well below the average annual gain, driving home the lesson that over any particular investment period, your average returns may be well above or below average.
A stock market bubble inflates and explodes when investors, acting in a herd mentality, tend to buy stocks en masse, leading to inflated and unrealistically high market prices. In describing market bubbles, former U.S. Reserve Chair Alan Greenspan referred to investors' "irrational exuberance" on the stock market in 1996, although his prophecy didn't really ring true, as the stock market continued to grow before entering into bear market territory in 2000. A stock market bubble's "pop" is often a signal that the stock market is experiencing a crash over the short-term, and is shifting from bull-to-bear-market mode over the long-term.
But what drives the Toronto housing market? Will it succumb to the same fate as Vancouver or worse?   If you’re a buyer, you’re wondering which neighbourhoods and towns to focus on and whether this market will tank. If you’re a seller, you’re wondering if you’re going to miss the biggest payday of your life by not selling. If you’re close to retirement, you may want to carefully review your choice not to sell. 2017 is a grand time for you to sell and move onto a better life.
The following day, Black Tuesday, was a day of chaos. Forced to liquidate their stocks because of margin calls, overextended investors flooded the exchange with sell orders. The Dow fell 30.57 points to close at 230.07 on that day. The glamour stocks of the age saw their values plummet. Across the two days, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 23%.
"Dollar dominated the last 24 hours as the rupee collapsed to a fresh all-time low on spot. Policymakers tried everything, monetary intervention, and verbal steroids and even tried to circulate rumours about an "oil window". Nothing worked," said a Kotak Securities report. "The RBI added fuel to fire by denying any attempts to introduce special dollar window for the oil marketing companies." Moreover, rising Italian credit spreads whacked the euro, further pressuring the rupee.
Falling liquidity may occur if banks stop extending credit or if a regulator increases the margin requirements for traders. Sometimes when a central bank raises interest rates, banks will begin to call in some of their loans, triggering a shortage of liquidity in the market. The simplest explanation is that at some point the money runs out. Markets rise while investors continue to buy, and when they run out of money, markets fall. The exact cause of a crash is often easy to see in hindsight, but difficult to see at the time.
Even after the turnaround began in March 2009, it's not as if investors knew the bear had run its course. The S&P dropped by more than 15% in 2010 and by almost 20% in 2011. We know now that these setbacks were temporary speed bumps (albeit scary ones) within a new bull market. But investors back then didn't have the advantage of being able to consult a stock chart, as we can today, that showed them how it all played out.
This crisis is rooted in the failure to learn the lessons of 2008 and of every other recession since the Fed’s creation: A secretive central bank should not be allowed to manipulate interest rates and distort economic signals regarding market conditions. Such action leads to malinvestment and an explosion of individual, business, and government debt. This may cause a temporary boom, but the boom soon will be followed by a bust. The only way this cycle can be broken without a major crisis is for Congress both to restore people’s right to use the currency of their choice and to audit and then end the Fed.
Research at the New England Complex Systems Institute has found warning signs of crashes using new statistical analysis tools of complexity theory. This work suggests that the panics that lead to crashes come from increased mimicry in the market. A dramatic increase in market mimicry occurred during the whole year before each market crash of the past 25 years, including the recent financial crisis. When investors closely follow each other's cues, it is easier for panic to take hold and affect the market. This work is a mathematical demonstration of a significant advance warning sign of impending market crashes.[19][20]

In this example, a tail-hedged portfolio would spend 0.5% of its equity exposure every month buying 2-month put options that are about 30% out-of-the-money. After one month, those put options are sold and new ones bought according to the same methodology. Spitznagel demonstrates the value of this methodology in the chart below. When Tobin’s Q is in its uppermost quartile, the portfolio he describes above outperforms a simple buy-and-hold approach by about 4% per year.

Other scientists disagree with this notion, and note that market crashes are indeed “special.” Professor Didier Sornette, for example, a physicist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, argued that a market crash is not simply a scaled-up version of a normal down day but a true outlier to market behavior. In fact, he claims that ahead of critical points the market starts giving off some clues. His work focuses on interpreting these clues and identify when a bubble may be forming and, crucially, when it ends.
Robbins has also sold a crazy number of books. And while he may not be best known for his investing chops, he draws on the likes of Ray Dalio, Jack Bogle and others for the inspiration behind his #1 best-seller “Unshakeable: Your Financial Freedom Playbook,” which MarketWatch earlier this year counted among the eight best books about money published in 2017.
This crisis is rooted in the failure to learn the lessons of 2008 and of every other recession since the Fed’s creation: A secretive central bank should not be allowed to manipulate interest rates and distort economic signals regarding market conditions. Such action leads to malinvestment and an explosion of individual, business, and government debt. This may cause a temporary boom, but the boom soon will be followed by a bust. The only way this cycle can be broken without a major crisis is for Congress both to restore people’s right to use the currency of their choice and to audit and then end the Fed.

Finally, once the perfect storm outlined above occurs, the policy tools for addressing it will be sorely lacking. The space for fiscal stimulus is already limited by massive public debt. The possibility for more unconventional monetary policies will be limited by bloated balance sheets and the lack of headroom to cut policy rates. And financial-sector bailouts will be intolerable in countries with resurgent populist movements and near-insolvent governments.
A better measure of the inadequacy of the current mélange of IT antiquities is that the SEC/CFTC report on the May 6 crash was released on September 30, 2010. Taking nearly five months to analyze the wildest ever five minutes of market data is unacceptable. CFTC Chair Gensler specifically blamed the delay on the “enormous” effort to collect and analyze data. What an enormous mess it is.
Stock markets dropped today as trading closed with the DOW down 500 points more. The NASDAQ fell a further 70 points and and S&P about 30 points. There’s a lot of guessing as to what’s happening such as pessimistic earnings season reports, China trade worries, and multinational corporate performance (cheap labor market access) in doubt going forward as 2019 nears.
Currently, the U.S. stock market is in the midst of one of the longest bull markets in its history. Since bottoming out in March 2009, the broad-based S&P 500 (INDEX: ^GSPC), led by a strong rally in technology stocks and other growth industries, has surged by more than 325%! Mind you, the stock market has historically returned 7% a year, inclusive of dividend reinvestment and adjusted for inflation. So, to say that things are going well right now would be an understatement.
With that in mind, the fact is that the Buffett Indicator is at its highest point in history -- meaning that stocks have never been valued as high as they are now in terms of market cap to GDP. While this indicator doesn't necessarily mean that the tides will turn anytime in the near future, it may be a smart idea to start thinking a little defensively.

The Indian rupee strengthened further against US dollar in the early afternoon deals on Friday following the sustained weakness in the crude oil prices. The domestic currency (rupee) extended morning gains on Friday and hit a fresh 2-week high at 71.7663, up 62 paise per unit US dollar, the Bloomberg data showed. The rupee is trading 120 paise higher from the all-time low of 72.97 apiece US dollar. Earlier on Tuesday this week, the rupee went very close to hitting 73/$ and made a record low at 72.9675 against US dollar. 

Since Trump has already started a trade war with China and wouldn’t dare attack nuclear-armed North Korea, his last best target would be Iran. By provoking a military confrontation with that country, he would trigger a stagflationary geopolitical shock not unlike the oil-price spikes of 1973, 1979 and 1990. Needless to say, that would make the oncoming global recession even more severe.

Since February 2013, the broad market has three circuit breakers tied to the performance of the S&P 500 index. If it loses 7%, 13%, or 20% of its value compared to the previous days close, trading halts for a period of time. If anything can be considered a stock market crash, it's hitting these circuit breakers.Remember, Black Monday (October 19, 1987) saw the DJIA lose 22.6% in a single day.
This begs the salient question: How much lower will the growth rate of earnings be in 2019 for the S&P 500? Earnings growth in 2018 peaked at 25%. However, with the top global economies all rolling over, peak corporate margins, trade wars, the waning of repatriation and stock buybacks, soaring worldwide debt and trillion dollar U.S. deficits, mounting rate hikes from global central banks and a Fed that is destroying $600 billion this year through its reverse QE program, it is doubtful that there will by any earnings growth at all next year. Nevertheless, Wall Street Shlls are still pricing in 10% earnings growth and slapping a big multiple on top of it.

Meanwhile, domestic stock markets were closed on Thursday on account of Muharram. On Wednesday, the indices ended on a lower note. The S&P BSE Sensex settled at 37,121.22, down 169.45 points and the Nifty50 index of the National Stock Exchange (NSE) ended at 11,234.35, with a loss of 44.55 points. This was the lowest closing levels for markets since late July. (With agencies inputs)


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In the second half of 1982 the number of cartridges grew from 100 in June to more than 400 in December. Experts predicted a glut in 1983, with 10% of games producing 75% of sales.[23] BYTE stated in December that "in 1982 few games broke new ground in either design or format ... If the public really likes an idea, it is milked for all it's worth, and numerous clones of a different color soon crowd the shelves. That is, until the public stops buying or something better comes along. Companies who believe that microcomputer games are the hula hoop of the 1980s only want to play Quick Profit."[28] Bill Kunkel said in January 1983 that companies had "licensed everything that moves, walks, crawls, or tunnels beneath the earth. You have to wonder how tenuous the connection will be between the game and the movie Marathon Man. What are you going to do, present a video game root canal?"[29]
It used a hodge-podge menu of about $150 billion in short- and long-term debt, and $180 billion in repurchase, or "repo" agreements, as collateral on short-term repo loans. Once investors began doubting the quality of the collateral Lehman was using, they largely stopped allowing the company to roll over the repo loans into the next 24-hour period, and began asking for their money back -- in full.
Solid advice, but investors should broaden their horizons to encompass digital currency, as the fallacy of global fiat currency is insane in the social media world we live in today.  Trust in the government is eroding, as is the reporting needed to only use a dollar denominated unit of measure in a world where block chain and liquid, easy to use Bitcoins are in your digital wallet and you can buy anything from an airline ticket to a car on auction on eBay.
However, what I like about the first strategy is that the dollar amounts are limited up front (and we don’t have to make any assumptions about future implied volatility). The worst case scenario is you spend 0.5% of your portfolio every month buying worthless put options. The only way they would all be worthless is if the stock market went almost straight up for the entire year. And in that case, the equity portfolio should do far better than the losses spent on this sort of insurance against a crash.
Market collapses can really hurt older investors. A stock market collapse can inflict damage across the board, demographically, but the impact on older Americans is especially onerous. Think of a 67-year-old retiree whose assets are largely tied up in the stock market: The value of those assets plummets after a market crash. While a 25-year-old has plenty of time to rebuild portfolio assets, a 67-year-old does not, and doesn't have the needed income any longer to even play "catch up" in the stock market.

So many people blindly put money into their 401k and assume it will grow into something they can retire on. This is an extremely bad plan for one main reason, lack of diversification. Sure, they might have money in three or four different funds, but it’s still fully invested in stocks and is entirely dependent on market growth. In the event of a crash, they’re absolutely screwed.
On November 8, 2016, Donald Trump was declared to have been elected as the 45th president of the United States. During the evening and night of the 8th and through the morning of the 9th, global financial markets lost a tremendous amount of value—at one point, US markets had lost a trillion dollars in one of the biggest crashes ever. While the overnight US markets showed big losses, even hitting the circuit breakers, the day of November 9 closed with the three major stock indexes up over a point each. It's too early to tell what this means in the long term.

These countries are full of boastful bravado about their ability to stand on their own two feet without the US, the reality is the abruptness of the protectism wave might be too much. If these economies collapse, including a China housing market collapse would a Tsunamai be sent toward US shores that would send into recession.  Right now, this could be the number one threat.


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If you doubt that, go back to the last major slump, the near 60% decline in the Standard & Poor's 500 index from early October, 2007 to early March, 2009. It's easy to see with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight that it would have been smart to get out of the market the first week of October. But that was hardly obvious in real time. In fact, after dropping by almost 20% from October to early March 2008, stocks rallied for a 12% gain into the middle of May. We know now that this was just a brief respite from what would turn out to be a gut-wrenching bear market. But for all investors knew at the time, that 12% rebound could have signaled the end of the selloff and a resumption of the market's advance.
The SEC and CFTC joint 2010 report itself says that "May 6 started as an unusually turbulent day for the markets" and that by the early afternoon "broadly negative market sentiment was already affecting an increase in the price volatility of some individual securities". At 2:32 p.m. (EDT), against a "backdrop of unusually high volatility and thinning liquidity" that day, a large fundamental trader (known to be Waddell & Reed Financial Inc.[23]) "initiated a sell program to sell a total of 75,000 E-Mini S&P contracts (valued at approximately $4.1 billion) as a hedge to an existing equity position". The report says that this was an unusually large position and that the computer algorithm the trader used to trade the position was set to "target an execution rate set to 9% of the trading volume calculated over the previous minute, but without regard to price or time".[41]

Meanwhile, research and follow the companies on your list and get to know them well. Develop a strong understanding of just how they make their money, what their sustainable competitive advantages are, what their competition looks like, what their growth potential looks like, and how financially strong they are, such as in terms of cash and debt. When the market crashes, you'll be familiar with a bunch of companies and will have a sense of which are most compelling, growing most briskly and priced attractively. Monitoring your list regularly can help you notice when a company of interest, but not the overall market, falls in price significantly, presenting a possibly great buying opportunity.
You might be wondering if we’ve endured one too many ghost apparitions. To suggest that no less than Warren Buffett, whose net worth is north of $80.0 billion, expects the market to reverse its bullish course seems not just scary, it seems silly. But Warren Buffett’s predictions for 2018 call for at least a market correction—if not an outright crash.
We have entered a time when global events appear to be accelerating significantly.  Earlier today, bombs were mailed to major political leaders all over the United States.  In the Middle East, it looks like Israel and Hamas could go to war at any moment.  And we continue to see a rise in major seismic events – including three very large earthquakes that just hit the Cascadia Subduction Zone.
Jones is widely credited with predicting, and profiting, from the stock-market crash on Oct. 19, 1987, which saw the Dow lose nearly 23% of its value, marking the largest one-day percentage decline for the blue-chip benchmark in its history. Jones founded Tudor in 1980 and became known for trading everything from currencies to commodities. His record has featured middling returns and an exodus of billions from his hedge fund in more recent years. According to a Forbes list of billionaires, Jones boasts a net worth of $4.7 billion
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