Asian stock markets rose on Friday after Wall Street hit a new high and a survey showed Japanese manufacturing accelerating, an AP report said. Tokyo's Nikkei 225 rose 0.5% to 23,793.35, Hong Kong's Hang Seng added 0.9% to 27,712.47, China's Shanghai Composite Index climbed 0.3%, erasing earlier losses, to 2,737.27 while Seoul's Kospi was up 0.2% at 2,327.87. 
Economic effects of the September 11 attacks (2001) Stock market downturn of 2002 Chinese stock bubble of 2007 United States bear market of 2007–09 Financial crisis of 2007–08 Dubai debt standstill European debt crisis 2010 Flash Crash 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami (Aftermath) August 2011 stock markets fall 2011 Bangladesh share market scam 2015–16 Chinese stock market turbulence 2015–16 stock market crash 2016 United Kingdom EU referendum (Aftermath) 2018 Cryptocurrency crash
The rising dollar has already caused "an emerging market slowdown aggravated by U.S. tariffs, which already contributed to a bear market in China and Turkish lira crash. Dollar upside risk remains as the U.S. Federal Reserve intends to hike despite risks abroad, including a contentious Brazilian Presidential election, Italian budget, Brexit planning," he added.
But Ethan Harris, head of global economics at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, lists a number of global disputes coming to a head this fall, including tariffs on imports from China, the potential for auto tariffs on other countries, Iran oil sanctions kicking in, Congress facing another budget deadline and the election in November. "The risk calendar gets quite big this fall," he said. "September is part of it, but it's really the whole fall period."

Investing in the stock market is inherently risky, but what makes for winning long-term returns is the ability to ride out the unpleasantness and remain invested for the eventual recovery (which, historically speaking, is always on the horizon). You’ll be able to do that if you know how much volatility you’re willing to stomach in exchange for higher potential returns.
If you’ve gone with a “set it and forget it” strategy — like investing in a target-date retirement fund, as many 401(k) plans allow you to do, or using a robo-advisor — diversification already is built in. In this case, it’s best to sit tight and trust that your portfolio is ready to ride out the storm. You’ll still experience some painful short-term jolts, but this will help you avoid losses from which your portfolio can’t recover.
Professor:        I certainly believe so, but this will happen with extreme volatility. I am more worried about the retail investor the so called silent majority. With this wild fluctuation, his survival rate in the market is next to zero. He will not easily believe that the market will bounce back in the near term. You cannot blame him. His ability to withstand paper loss (temporary) is very small. So he will easily buckle and sell out. All I can say is that we are slowing moving into a panic mode. We still have to wait a while to see the green shoots. Are we ready to wait?
The 1929 crash brought the Roaring Twenties to a halt.[35] As tentatively expressed by economic historian Charles P. Kindleberger, in 1929, there was no lender of last resort effectively present, which, if it had existed and been properly exercised, would have been key in shortening the business slowdown that normally follows financial crises.[32] The crash marked the beginning of widespread and long-lasting consequences for the United States. Historians still debate the question: did the 1929 Crash spark The Great Depression,[36] or did it merely coincide with the bursting of a loose credit-inspired economic bubble? Only 16% of American households were invested in the stock market within the United States during the period leading up to the depression, suggesting that the crash carried somewhat less of a weight in causing the depression.
Impact of high frequency traders: Regulators found that high frequency traders exacerbated price declines. Regulators determined that high frequency traders sold aggressively to eliminate their positions and withdrew from the markets in the face of uncertainty.[23][24][25][26] A July 2011 report by the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO), an international body of securities regulators, concluded that while "algorithms and HFT technology have been used by market participants to manage their trading and risk, their usage was also clearly a contributing factor".[27][28] Other theories postulate that the actions of high frequency traders (HFTs) were the underlying cause of the flash crash. One hypothesis, based on the analysis of bid-ask data by Nanex, LLC, is that HFTs send non-executable orders (orders that are outside the bid-ask spread) to exchanges in batches. Though the purpose of these orders is unknown, some experts speculate that their purpose is to increase noise, clog exchanges, and outwit competitors.[29] However, other experts believe that deliberate market manipulation is unlikely because there is no practical way in which the HFTs can profit from these orders, and it is more likely that these orders are designed to test latency times and to detect early price trends.[30] Whatever the reasons behind the possible existence of these orders, this theory postulates that they exacerbated the crash by overloading the exchanges on May 6.[29][30] On September 3, 2010, the regulators probing the crash concluded: "that quote-stuffing—placing and then almost immediately cancelling large numbers of rapid-fire orders to buy or sell stocks—was not a 'major factor' in the turmoil".[31] Some have put forth the theory that high-frequency trading was actually a major factor in minimizing and reversing the flash crash.[32]
Refraining from tinkering with your portfolio, or even making dramatic changes such as fleeing to cash or switching to different investments altogether, may be challenging at times. That can especially be the case when the market appears to be going haywire and every news story and TV financial show you see seems to suggest that the market is on the verge of Armageddon.
In the US specifically, lawmakers have constrained the ability of the Fed to provide liquidity to non-bank and foreign financial institutions with dollar-denominated liabilities. And in Europe, the rise of populist parties is making it harder to pursue EU-level reforms and create the institutions necessary to combat the next financial crisis and downturn.

In the US, news on the trade dispute with China will remain a focus. Beyond that, the focus will be the US Federal Reserve (Fed) (Wednesday) which is expected to raise interest rates for the eighth time for this cycle taking the Fed Funds rate range to 2-2.25% and signal that more gradual rate hikes are likely. Markets have already fully factored this in, so the interest will be on the Fed’s commentary about the outlook and its “dot plot” of future rate hikes. While the Fed may remove its description of policy as being “accommodative” its economic commentary is likely to be upbeat and the dot plot is likely to remain consistent with more gradual rate hikes, ultimately taking the Fed Funds rate above the Fed’s currently assessed long run “neutral rate” of around 2.75-3%. This will likely mean more rate hikes over the next two years than the three and a half the market is currently allowing for. On the data front in the US, expect ongoing home price gains and another strong consumer confidence reading (both Tuesday), slight gains in new home sales (Wednesday) and pending home sales (Thursday), ongoing strength in durable goods orders (also Thursday) continued strength in consumer spending but a fall back in core private consumption deflator inflation to 1.9% year-on-year for August (Friday).
Good harvests had built up a mass of 250 million bushels of wheat to be "carried over" when 1929 opened. By May there was also a winter-wheat crop of 560 million bushels ready for harvest in the Mississippi Valley. This oversupply caused a drop in wheat prices so heavy that the net incomes of the farming population from wheat were threatened with extinction. Stock markets are always sensitive to the future state of commodity markets, and the slump in Wall Street predicted for May by Sir George Paish arrived on time. In June 1929, the position was saved by a severe drought in the Dakotas and the Canadian West, plus unfavorable seed times in Argentina and eastern Australia. The oversupply would now be wanted to fill the big gaps in the 1929 world wheat production. From 97¢ per bushel in May, the price of wheat rose to $1.49 in July. When it was seen that at this figure American farmers would get rather more for their smaller crop than for that of 1928, stocks went up again.
When you think of oil production, the Middle East or OPEC is probably what comes to mind. But substantial shale finds in the United States in recent decades have pushed the nation the No. 3 spot in terms of daily production as of 2016, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. At 8.88 million barrels of oil production per day, the U.S. is responsible for more than 10% of global production. 
By July 8, 1933, the Dow was down to 41.22. That was a 90 percent loss from its record-high close of 381.2 on September 3, 1929. It was the worst bear market in terms of percentage loss in modern U.S. history. The largest one-day percentage gain also occurred during that time. On March 15, 1933, the Dow rose 15.34 percent, a gain of 8.26 points, to close at 62.10.
Currently, the U.S. stock market is in the midst of one of the longest bull markets in its history. Since bottoming out in March 2009, the broad-based S&P 500 (INDEX: ^GSPC), led by a strong rally in technology stocks and other growth industries, has surged by more than 325%! Mind you, the stock market has historically returned 7% a year, inclusive of dividend reinvestment and adjusted for inflation. So, to say that things are going well right now would be an understatement.
The economy had been growing for most of the Roaring Twenties. It was a technological golden age, as innovations such as the radio, automobile, aviation, telephone, and the power grid were deployed and adopted. Companies that had pioneered these advances, like Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and General Motors, saw their stocks soar. Financial corporations also did well, as Wall Street bankers floated mutual fund companies (then known as investment trusts) like the Goldman Sachs Trading Corporation. Investors were infatuated with the returns available in the stock market, especially by the use of leverage through margin debt.
It’s also important to remember that the real value in this strategy is only during times of extreme overvaluation in the stock market. Most of the time “tail hedging” in this way does not add any real benefit and can actually be a major hindrance to overall performance. That said, the stock market currently meets Spitznagel’s uppermost threshold for hedging so, according to both him and Taleb, it’s probably something most investors ought to consider right now.
The internet is a wonderful place, and best of all, this knowledge can be found for FREE! The more you know about crisis situations, the more ready you will be to face them. Some sites are friendlier to beginners than others, so if you stumble upon a forum where people seem less than enthusiastic about helping people who are just starting out, don’t let it get you down. Move on and find a site that makes you feel comfortable. Following are some of my favorites, and the link will take you to a good starting point on these sites. In no particular order:
Consequently, we believe, that irrespective of technology, markets can become fragile when imbalances arise as a result of large traders seeking to buy or sell quantities larger than intermediaries are willing to temporarily hold, and simultaneously long-term suppliers of liquidity are not forthcoming even if significant price concessions are offered.
DSP Mutual Fund sold Dewan Housing bonds this week to boost its cash holdings before an expected tightening of market liquidity in September, Kalpen Parekh, president of DSP, said in an interview. The firm sold 3 billion rupees ($41.6 million) of the bonds to express “our interest view, not a credit view,” Parekh said. “This has been done across issuers over last few days.”
Although this latest round of fiscal and monetary stimulus has not had the anticipated economic effect to date, it has produced a negative effect on the Chinese yuan. Leaving some to wonder if China is finally losing control over its currency. In August 2015, an unexpected devaluation in the yuan led to a capital flight as Chinese companies, citizens and investors sought to protect themselves from further declines in the currency. If the yuan weakens too quickly again—either naturally or by another planned devaluation—this would add even more chaos to the already fragile global markets.
The latest round of US/China tariffs had been long flagged and both the US increase (10% on US$200 billion of imports from China, but not yet 25%) and China’s less than proportional retaliation (5-10% on US$60 billion of imports) were less than feared. This, along with reports China is planning a broad cut to its tariffs, was positive and leaves scope for negotiations. More significantly, we are still a long way from a full-blown trade war. After implementation of the latest round, only about 12% of US imports will be subject to increased tariffs and the average tariff increase across all imports will be just 1.6% - implying about a 0.2% boost to inflation and a less than 0.2% hit to growth. In China, the economic impact is likely to be less than 0.5% of GDP. This is all a long way from 1930 when the US levied a 20% tariff hike on all imports and other countries did the same making the depression “great”.
Maybe Coca-Cola announced record earnings. Maybe it's the middle of the month, and your 401(k) contribution has just come out of your paycheck, so you automatically bought a fund or individual stocks. Maybe you've just retired, and you'd like to take 40 years of profits to pay off your mortgage, so you're selling some stocks. Maybe a stock hasn't gone anywhere for you, and you don't mind taking a little loss for the tax break. Maybe you found a bargain and you just can't wait to snap up a few shares. Maybe it's a stock bubble or stock valuations are running high.
Homeowners are not taking as much equity out of their homes. Home equity rose to $85 billion in 2006. It collapsed to less than $10 billion in 2010. It remained there until 2015. By 2017, it had only risen to $14 billion. Obamacare is one reason for that. Bankruptcy filings have fallen 50 percent since the ACA was passed. In 2010, 1.5 million people filed. In 2016, only 770,846 did. 
Will stock investors panic spill over to the housing markets and cause the Fed to pull back on rate increases? Is too much bad news, negative earnings outlook, rising interest rates, global trade friction, supply chain disruptions, or declining stock performance making investors panicky? Something about the market fundamentals is outside investor’s comfort zone. Is this a stock market correction, or a warning that the market could begin to slide?

John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Sean Williams has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Netflix. The Motley Fool has the following options: long January 2020 $150 calls on Apple and short January 2020 $155 calls on Apple. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.
The crash shook the then-booming industry, and led to the bankruptcy of several companies producing home computers and video game consoles in the region. It lasted about two years. Analysts of the time expressed doubts about the long-term viability of video game consoles and software. The North American video game console industry recovered a few years later, mostly due to the widespread success of the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in 1985; Nintendo designed the NES as the Western branding for its Famicom console originally released in 1983 to avoid the missteps that caused the 1983 crash and avoid the stigma that video games had at that time.

Bush came into office just as the terrorists mounted their attack. Clinton was the President previously. I think Bush was stunned at the attack just as he was sitting down in the Oval Office. Are you suggesting they attacked because of what they thought Bush might do in future? Half of the debt came with Obama so why is he innocent of all this? Why couldn’t the trillions dished out be tracked? Wouldn’t it have been better spent on badly needed infrastructure spending? Joe, I’m not sure you have a good argument here, but thanks for contributing.
This post delves briefly into the theory and factors involved in market crashes, corrections and selloffs including investor expectations and mood, FED decisions, government meddling and AI systems (Note: even the people who make Artificial intelligence and self-learning algorithms have admitted they don’t understand how the AI systems make decisions. They learn and make decisions independent of human input and may not be  able to report to humans how and why they acted).

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In Berkshire's 2017 shareholder letter, Buffett outlined four times when Berkshire stock fell 37% or more, representing what he called "truly major dips." The biggest decline occurred from March 1973 to January 1975, when Berkshire stock declined a whopping 59%. "In the next 53 years our shares (and others) will experience declines resembling those in the table," Buffett said about these four major declines. "No one can tell you when these will happen. The light can at any time go from green to red without pausing at yellow.

After a one-day recovery on October 30, where the Dow regained an additional 28.40 points, or 12 percent, to close at 258.47, the market continued to fall, arriving at an interim bottom on November 13, 1929, with the Dow closing at 198.60. The market then recovered for several months, starting on November 14, with the Dow gaining 18.59 points to close at 217.28, and reaching a secondary closing peak (i.e., bear market rally) of 294.07 on April 17, 1930. The following year, the Dow embarked on another, much longer, steady slide from April 1931 to July 8, 1932, when it closed at 41.22—its lowest level of the 20th century, concluding an 89 percent loss rate for all of the market's stocks.
The SEC and CFTC joint 2010 report itself says that "May 6 started as an unusually turbulent day for the markets" and that by the early afternoon "broadly negative market sentiment was already affecting an increase in the price volatility of some individual securities". At 2:32 p.m. (EDT), against a "backdrop of unusually high volatility and thinning liquidity" that day, a large fundamental trader (known to be Waddell & Reed Financial Inc.[23]) "initiated a sell program to sell a total of 75,000 E-Mini S&P contracts (valued at approximately $4.1 billion) as a hedge to an existing equity position". The report says that this was an unusually large position and that the computer algorithm the trader used to trade the position was set to "target an execution rate set to 9% of the trading volume calculated over the previous minute, but without regard to price or time".[41]
As an investment banker who buys blocks of mortgages around America this is an important subject as to whether the value of my collateral will deteriorate. Talbott does a good job presenting his case that there is a relationship between household income and housing prices. His point is well taken that low interest rates have fueled this boom and that when rates rise, housing prices will have to come down. So, from the perspective of his thesis, I found this to be well written and well documented even if I agree there is a risk but do not believe that it will be significant.
In this book, published in 2003, Talbott predicted a housing crash that would start around 2005. In fact, the peak of the housing market was the summer of 2005. It took longer for the fall in prices to take down the whole economy. Talbott explained in an easy-to-understand way why it was inevitable that housing prices would fall and crash the economy. The advice over what to do about it wasn't as good as the prediction.
A market collapse can wipe out what economists call "paper wealth." Paper wealth is money tied up in investments like the stock market or the real estate market that could be sold for a gain, but hasn't yet. In contrast, "real wealth" refers to actual, physical assets, like the money in your bank account, or a vehicle you own that is fully paid off and can be sold for a definite financial gain.
The Indian rupee jumped as much as 55 paise against the US dollar in the opening trade at the interbank foreign exchange market on Friday. The rupee regained a level of 71.8288, up 55 paise per unit US dollar, the Bloomberg data showed. India's government is planning to ask state oil firms to lock in their crude futures purchase prices, Reuters reported citing an unidentified government source, anticipating a spike when US sanctions on Iran snap back again in November. The move would be another step to tackle a slide in the rupee, as oil prices are putting pressure on India, the report added. 
Forthcoming state elections are being pitched as Modi’s acid test before the parliamentary elections scheduled for May. As the Opposition seeks to cobble together a coalition against the Modi-led BJP and raise fresh controversies to corner his administration, analysts and political observers are losing their earlier confidence about Modi’s chances of winning a second term. An adverse election result may bring in temporary uncertainty over policy continuity and make investors nervous.
The yuan has fallen nearly 10% against the dollar since April ‘18. The Chinese are currently trying to keep the currency from falling below the key support level of seven to the dollar. The yuan hasn’t traded that low in more than a decade; but holding that line has become more difficult as China dances capriciously from deleveraging to massive stimulus measures. In order to defend the value of the Yuan, China has depleted much of its dollar reserves.
Most importantly, China’s debt binge was taken up in record time; soaring by over 2,000% in the past 18 years. And this earth shattering debt spree wasn’t used to generate productive assets. Rather, it was the non-productive, state-directed variety, which now requires a constant stream of new debt to pay off the maturing debt. Therefore, the schizophrenic communist party is caught between the absolute need to deleverage the economy; and at the same time, trying to maintain the growth mirage with additional stimulus measures.
Also, be sure you're focused on percentages, not points, when thinking about stock market movements. This is something the media doesn't sufficiently understand, often reporting market drops in points instead of percentages. As an example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped by a whopping 1,175 points in a single day in February 2018, which sure sounds like a lot -- especially compared with 1987's "Black Monday," when the Dow fell 508 points. But in percentage points, it was a meaningful yet not catastrophic 4.6% decline -- while 1987's drop wiped out 22.6% of the market's value at the time. The Dow was near 26,000 at the time of this writing, and the S&P 500 was around 2,800. At those levels, if the Dow "plunges" by 260 points, remember that it would be just a 1% move. Even a 1,000-point drop would be just a 3.85% decline.
Some experts cite the euphoria of stock markets during their bull runs. They suggest the heightened unrealistic expectations create a platform for disaster and when reality strikes, truth launches panicked sell offs. Some say the overvalued stocks, economy, and general optimism present right is a sure predecessor of a crash. It may have been that way in 1987.
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