The facts are that you need a house in Canada because it’s too cold to live outside. So in that sense, the house regardless of it’s monetary value is worth more for its intrinsic value which is as it should be. I could make a very convincing argument that primary residences are not investments at all. I have a 4 year old and I do know quite a bit about the real estate market. In fact if I sold my house right now I believe that it would work out really well financially. However I also know a lot about landlords because that is my business. I would not choose to subject myself to that market because simply I do not believe that the rental market as it stands is sustainable for many landlords. Landlords do have to “cheap out” on their houses because they are generally not going to be willing and in some cases able to maintain the house over time. As a tenant what do you do if a landlord can’t afford a new furnace or roof? What if they decide to sell the house, the timing may be really bad for me. I like the additional control and security owning my own house free and clear gives me.
Our tail-hedged portfolio consists of S&P 500 and out-of-the-money put options (specifically one delta which has a strike roughly 30% to 35% below spot) on the S&P 500. At the beginning of every calendar month, using actual option prices, the number of third-month options (with a maturity from 11 to 12 weeks, and also carrying over the payoff from unexpired options) is determined such that the tail-hedged portfolio breaks even for a down 20% move in the S&P 500 over a month. From practice, for scaling the payoff, we can safely assume the S&P 500 options’ implied volatility, or IVol, surface would look similar to the one observed after the lows of the October 2002 crash.
You can cushion the effects of a crash by allocating to defensive and blue-chip stocks, bonds, gold and cash. Having some cash in your portfolio also allows you to buy back into the market at lower levels. The current stock market is fairly expensive, but there are no signs of an imminent crash. However, that doesn’t mean market conditions can’t change quickly. That’s why you should always be ready for the next crash.

If you haven't been periodically rebalancing your portfolio, you may be invested more aggressively than you think. Someone who started out with a mix of 70% stocks and 30% bonds when this bull market began back in 2009 and simply re-invested all gains in whatever investment generated them, would have something close to a portfolio 90% stocks and 10% bonds today.
The last week of January 2018 and the first week of February 2018, the Dow Jones dropped several hundred points. It looks to close out February 2 down hundreds of points, with other indexes (S&P 500, NASDAQ) to follow. While this may seem like a crisis, it is more than likely to reflect short-term investors taking their profits (in the long run up to this point) and shuffling them to other types of investments to prepare for improved bond yields.
Indeed, Buffett's ability to tune out the noise and remain optimistic amid these downturns has played a vital role in his unrivaled performance over decades. Between 1965 and the end of 2017, Berkshire's market value has increased at an annualized rate of 20.9%, more than doubling the S&P 500's average annual growth of 9.9% during this same period. This 20.9% annualized growth rate for Berkshire's market value translates to a total return of 2,404,748%, obliterating the S&P 500's 15,508% gain during the same timeframe.
You might be wondering if we’ve endured one too many ghost apparitions. To suggest that no less than Warren Buffett, whose net worth is north of $80.0 billion, expects the market to reverse its bullish course seems not just scary, it seems silly. But Warren Buffett’s predictions for 2018 call for at least a market correction—if not an outright crash.

As an investment banker who buys blocks of mortgages around America this is an important subject as to whether the value of my collateral will deteriorate. Talbott does a good job presenting his case that there is a relationship between household income and housing prices. His point is well taken that low interest rates have fueled this boom and that when rates rise, housing prices will have to come down. So, from the perspective of his thesis, I found this to be well written and well documented even if I agree there is a risk but do not believe that it will be significant.
The resultant rise of mass unemployment is seen as a result of the crash, although the crash is by no means the sole event that contributed to the depression. The Wall Street Crash is usually seen as having the greatest impact on the events that followed and therefore is widely regarded as signaling the downward economic slide that initiated the Great Depression. True or not, the consequences were dire for almost everybody. Most academic experts agree on one aspect of the crash: It wiped out billions of dollars of wealth in one day, and this immediately depressed consumer buying.[36]
Stock up on supplies.  Make sure you are prepped. If you’re behind on your preparedness efforts and need to do this quickly, you can order buckets of emergency food just to have some on hand. (Learn how to build an emergency food supply using freeze dried food HERE) Hit the grocery store or wholesale club and stock up there, too, on  your way home.

To be able to make good decisions amid a stock market crash, investors will need to be able to remain calm. As Buffett has said, "Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with the 130 IQ. Once you have ordinary intelligence, what you need is the temperament to control the urges that get other people into trouble in investing."

But Ethan Harris, head of global economics at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, lists a number of global disputes coming to a head this fall, including tariffs on imports from China, the potential for auto tariffs on other countries, Iran oil sanctions kicking in, Congress facing another budget deadline and the election in November. "The risk calendar gets quite big this fall," he said. "September is part of it, but it's really the whole fall period."
A stock market bubble inflates and explodes when investors, acting in a herd mentality, tend to buy stocks en masse, leading to inflated and unrealistically high market prices. In describing market bubbles, former U.S. Reserve Chair Alan Greenspan referred to investors' "irrational exuberance" on the stock market in 1996, although his prophecy didn't really ring true, as the stock market continued to grow before entering into bear market territory in 2000. A stock market bubble's "pop" is often a signal that the stock market is experiencing a crash over the short-term, and is shifting from bull-to-bear-market mode over the long-term.
As the year drew to a close, the Bureau of Economic Analysis revised its growth estimate higher. It said that the nation’s gross domestic product had increased 0.5 percent in the third quarter. Its prior estimate said it had shrunk 0.5 percent. It seemed the U.S. economy could shrug off a housing downturn and banks’ liquidity constraints. The Dow ended the year just slightly off its October high, at 13,264.82.

Refraining from tinkering with your portfolio, or even making dramatic changes such as fleeing to cash or switching to different investments altogether, may be challenging at times. That can especially be the case when the market appears to be going haywire and every news story and TV financial show you see seems to suggest that the market is on the verge of Armageddon.
The housing market peaked somewhere in 2006. We were beginning to see some of the early signs of trouble when some types of subprime loans started to go into default. There wasn’t worry at that time since never in history have prices for housing market gone down nationally. Once the credit markets froze in summer 2007, things began to deteriorate rapidly. Subprime credit stopped completely and interest rates for credit for other types of borrowing including corporate loans as well as consumer loans rose dramatically.
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You Marxist piece of shit. What the hell do you think the entire banking industry is based on. Should we throw our money at each other, hoping someone else reciprocates so we don’t have to eat discarded baby fetus? Interest is necessary to compensate for risk, which you would have known if you took your head out of Hegel’s ass and learned some basic financial theory. These subprime loans were the riskiest fucking things on the market, but they were rated AAA. Don’t fucking crucify bankers for being goddamn rational human beings while you complain about society passing you goodbye. Get off the fucking Communist high road and realize some shit about the world and how it works.
It looks like it could be another tough week for global financial markets.  As the week began, markets were down all over the world, and relations between the United States and Saudi Arabia have taken a sudden turn for the worse.  That could potentially mean much, much higher oil prices, and needless to say that would be a very bad thing for the U.S. economy.  It has really surprised many of us how dramatically events have begun to accelerate here in the month of October, and the mood on Wall Street has taken a decidedly negative turn.  Yes, U.S. stocks did bounce back a bit on Friday (as I correctly anticipated), but it was much less of a bounce than many investors were hoping for.  And this week got off to a rough start with all of the major markets in Asia down significantly…

Throughout 2017 and 2018, the Federal Reserve discussed a policy of raising interest rates, as they'd been at historically low levels for a historically unprecedented amount of time. Remember the correlation between interest rates for US Treasury securities and stock prices—the more you can make with safer investments (T-bills, bonds), the less attractive the risks of stocks are.
While the A$ is working off very negative short positions and oversold conditions resulting in another short-term bounce, it’s still likely to fall to around US$0.70 and maybe into the high US$0.60s as the gap between the RBA’s cash rate and the US Fed Funds rate pushes further into negative territory because the US economy is booming relative to Australia. Being short the A$ remains a good hedge against things going wrong in the global economy.
Since February 2013, the broad market has three circuit breakers tied to the performance of the S&P 500 index. If it loses 7%, 13%, or 20% of its value compared to the previous days close, trading halts for a period of time. If anything can be considered a stock market crash, it's hitting these circuit breakers.Remember, Black Monday (October 19, 1987) saw the DJIA lose 22.6% in a single day.
It’s not over.  The worst October stock market crash since 2008 got even worse on Friday.  The Dow was down another 296 points, the S&P 500 briefly dipped into correction territory, and it was another bloodbath for tech stocks.  On Wednesday, I warned that there would be a bounce, and we saw that happen on Thursday.  But the bounce didn’t extend into Friday.  Instead, we witnessed another wave of panic selling, and that has many investors extremely concerned about what will happen next week.  Overall, global stocks have now fallen for five weeks in a row, and during that time more than 8 trillion dollars in global wealth has been wiped out.  That is the fastest plunge in global stock market wealth since the collapse of Lehman Brothers, and it is yet another confirmation that a major turning point has arrived.
As a Young Family (married with one child) home buyer, we made a loss when we sold out to move to the Toronto area and currently rent. Our landlord is selling up a the Townhouses in our area have grown from $280,000 10 years ago to one just selling a few days ago for $630,000. Last month they were selling for $450,000. We now have no option but to continue renting and are now looking at the city for a Rental Condo (which is now cheaper than the 3 hour daily �suburb commute) . We didn’t even have the money to buy when it was worth $280,000. Our house hold income is around $80,000 a year. The reality is, the average Canadian has a debt load at a level even higher than the unsustainable US pre 2008 crash.
You have to pay ~2.5-4% in unavoidable ownership fees as an owner even with your mortgage paid off (property taxes, insurance, maintenance, amortized transaction costs, etc). Even if we’re generous and assume that’s just 2.5%, that means all that that equity is only making you 2.5% (1.5% in Vancouver) in rent savings. If you don’t have the equity, you have to pay more than than to borrow it from the bank (or take on the risk of paying more). If you do and you invest it, then that can be substantial savings.

You have to pay ~2.5-4% in unavoidable ownership fees as an owner even with your mortgage paid off (property taxes, insurance, maintenance, amortized transaction costs, etc). Even if we’re generous and assume that’s just 2.5%, that means all that that equity is only making you 2.5% (1.5% in Vancouver) in rent savings. If you don’t have the equity, you have to pay more than than to borrow it from the bank (or take on the risk of paying more). If you do and you invest it, then that can be substantial savings.
Jones is widely credited with predicting, and profiting, from the stock-market crash on Oct. 19, 1987, which saw the Dow lose nearly 23% of its value, marking the largest one-day percentage decline for the blue-chip benchmark in its history. Jones founded Tudor in 1980 and became known for trading everything from currencies to commodities. His record has featured middling returns and an exodus of billions from his hedge fund in more recent years. According to a Forbes list of billionaires, Jones boasts a net worth of $4.7 billion
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