The heads of the SEC and CFTC often point out that they are running an IT museum. They have photographic evidence to prove it—the highest-tech background that The New York Times (on September 21, 2010) could find for a photo of Gregg Berman, the SEC’s point man on the Flash, was a corner with five PCs, a Bloomberg, a printer, a fax, and three TVs on the wall with several large clocks.

Thank you Dan. Congrats on the new member of the family. Yes, so many people are facing the decision to leave the GTA entirely. Might be agonizing at first, but it might be better for your kids. With the Internet, they won’t miss much. What do you think of Calgary? Buy low and and wait for oil to come back? Isn’t that how big fortunes are made? I don’t know of any such lists but perhaps I should make one:). What’s the first place that comes to mind when you think about moving?
When living in Australia between 1995 and 2005, I worked with someone who was 100% convinced that the Australian house price increases were unsustainable, that the market had peaked, and that selling out and getting back in a couple of years was a brilliant idea. Unfortunately, this was around 2002 or 2003 and all that Australian prices did for the next 7 or 8 years was to continue to increase. Last I heard from her, she and her husband had given up any hope of ever again owning their own house.
It's not enough to have a pile of cash to spend when the market crashes if you end up having no idea what to buy. So build and maintain a stock watch list. Start by jotting down the names of companies you read or hear about that seem like promising investments. You could do so on paper, but maintaining a list online is better. You can set up an online watch list or "portfolio" full of stocks of interest at sites such as finance.yahoo.com, morningstar.com, marketwatch.com and others. You might pretend that you bought one or more shares of each at the stock price at which you first noticed the company. That way, the portfolio will always reflect how much the stock has risen or fallen since then.

By 1983, consumers found that most predicted uses of home computers were unrealistic, except for games. Children used most home computers[9]—Coleco planned to market its Adam home computer to "boys age 8 to 16 and their fathers ... the two groups that really fuel computer purchases"[10]—so games dominated home computers' software libraries. A 1984 compendium of reviews of Atari 8-bit software used 198 pages for games compared to 167 for all other software types.[11] Because computers generally had more memory and faster processors than a console, they permitted more sophisticated games. They could also be used for tasks such as word processing and home accounting. Games were easier to duplicate, since they could be packaged as floppy disks or cassette tapes instead of ROM modules (though some cassette-based systems retained ROM modules as an "instant-on" option). This opened the field to a cottage industry of third-party software developers. Writeable storage media allowed players to save games in progress, a useful feature for increasingly complex games which was not available on the consoles of the era.

Stock market crashes are usually caused by more than one factor. In fact, there are often two sets of reasons for a crash. One set of conditions creates the environment for the sell-off, and another set of factors triggers the beginning of the sell-off. Just because there is a market bubble, it doesn’t mean the market will crash. Usually something needs to occur to cause investors to begin selling and buyers to step away from the stock market.

In my previous article entitled “Why Are So Many People Talking About The Potential For A Stock Market Crash In October?”, I noted that this has been the month with the most market volatility ever since the Dow was first established.  Absent some kind of major event, the stock market usually gets kind of sleepy around Thanksgiving and does not really spring to life again until after the new year has begun.
Some of this volatility reflects the uncertainty that switching the White House between two major parties always provides, but it also demonstrates how global markets see a Trump administration as unpredictable, unmoored, and even dangerous. Investors seeking safer investments turned to the stability of bonds, precious metals, and even cash while they wait to see what will come.
After Black Monday, regulators overhauled trade-clearing protocols to bring uniformity to all prominent market products. They also developed new rules, known as "trading curbs" or colloquially as circuit breakers, allowing exchanges to temporarily halt trading in instances of exceptionally large price declines in some indexes; for instance, the DJIA.[15]

I live in a housing bubble market with everyone attempting to buy at sky high prices. I bought 4.5 years ago, and am looking at selling for over a 100% gain in that amount of time. Yes attempting to sit on the sidelines waiting for the market to change may not seem the best, but rather than being intent on jumping back into the poker game because you like the action, take your earnings off the table. Markets can remain irrational for exuberant amounts of time, but you have to weigh it out. At the moment a 30% retrace would mean I lose $140,000 worth of equity currently available. I’ll rather that liquidity in the bank any day over paying the mortgage of an asset still owned by a lender, which to me is a liability.
2015–16 stock market selloff 18 August 2015 The Dow Jones fell 588 points during a two-day period, 1,300 points from August 18–21. On Monday, August 24, world stock markets were down substantially, wiping out all gains made in 2015, with interlinked drops in commodities such as oil, which hit a six-year price low, copper, and most of Asian currencies, but the Japanese yen, losing value against the United States dollar. With this plunge, an estimated ten trillion dollars had been wiped off the books on global markets since June 3. [30] [31] [32]
In late 1985 and early 1986, the United States economy shifted from a rapid recovery from the early 1980s recession to a slower expansion, resulting in a brief "soft landing" period as the economy slowed and inflation dropped. The stock market advanced significantly, with the Dow peaking in August 1987 at 2,722 points, or 44% over the previous year's closing of 1,895 points. Further financial uncertainty may have resulted from the collapse of OPEC in early 1986, which led to a crude oil price decrease of more than 50% by mid-1986.[2]
You can cushion the effects of a crash by allocating to defensive and blue-chip stocks, bonds, gold and cash. Having some cash in your portfolio also allows you to buy back into the market at lower levels. The current stock market is fairly expensive, but there are no signs of an imminent crash. However, that doesn’t mean market conditions can’t change quickly. That’s why you should always be ready for the next crash.
Sensex and Nifty observed a major crash in the afternoon trade today following a sharp fall in housing finance stocks. However, benchmark indices soon rebounded as Sensex recovered nearly 900 points after falling over 1,100 points and Nifty reclaimed 11,100-level within a matter of minutes in afternoon session. The 30-share index fell 1127.58 points, or 3.03 percent, to hit an intra-day low of 35,993.64. The index was trading 171.39 points, or 0.46 percent, lower at 36,949.83 at the time of reporting.
Having been suspended for three successive trading days (October 9, 10, and 13), the Icelandic stock market reopened on 14 October, with the main index, the OMX Iceland 15, closing at 678.4, which was about 77% lower than the 3,004.6 at the close on October 8. This reflected that the value of the three big banks, which had formed 73.2% of the value of the OMX Iceland 15, had been set to zero.
As you can see from the numbers Dennis has on the housing market, things are much better than they were before the last crash. Lending guidelines are much tougher no matter what you hear. I see posts on Facebook all the time about how people can get low-money-down loans now, and that means the housing crash is coming. Low-money-down loans have been available for decades, and that is not what caused the housing crash. Really bad loans to people who should not buy houses is what caused the housing crisis. Those loans do not exist anymore, as you can see by the data Dennis provided. Yes, it is possible to get a loan with less than a 600 credit score, but very few people are actually getting those loans. When you look at the housing market, you need to look at the real numbers of how many houses are being built, what kind of loans people are getting, and how much house people can afford. Houses are not being built like they were before. The loans people are getting are much higher quality, and the market is much more stable than it was before.
During 1930 and 1931 in particular, unemployed workers went on strike, demonstrated in public, and otherwise took direct action to call public attention to their plight. Within the UK, protests often focused on the so-called Means Test, which the government had instituted in 1931 as a way to limit the amount of unemployment payments made to individuals and families. For working people, the Means Test seemed an intrusive and insensitive way to deal with the chronic and relentless deprivation caused by the economic crisis. The strikes were met forcefully, with police breaking up protests, arresting demonstrators, and charging them with crimes related to the violation of public order.[39]
Having been suspended for three successive trading days (October 9, 10, and 13), the Icelandic stock market reopened on 14 October, with the main index, the OMX Iceland 15, closing at 678.4, which was about 77% lower than the 3,004.6 at the close on October 8. This reflected that the value of the three big banks, which had formed 73.2% of the value of the OMX Iceland 15, had been set to zero.

Many approaches to stock market analysis are statistical. This makes sense. Investing is rife with numbers and data and lots of time periods to slice and dice. In fact, most of the time, the markets appear to helpfully follow basic statistical models. However, it’s not that easy with market crashes. Here, there is surprisingly little data to go on, and many things that we might believe to be true simply aren't.
This post delves briefly into the theory and factors involved in market crashes, corrections and selloffs including investor expectations and mood, FED decisions, government meddling and AI systems (Note: even the people who make Artificial intelligence and self-learning algorithms have admitted they don’t understand how the AI systems make decisions. They learn and make decisions independent of human input and may not be  able to report to humans how and why they acted).
Conversely, if production issues strike a major producer (imagine, for example, a civil war in Libya), then skyrocketing oil prices could also have a detrimental impact. Rising crude prices could lead to significantly higher inflation levels and sap consumers of discretionary income at the pump or in their homes via fuel oil. We saw something similar to this in 2008, when West Texas Intermediate made a run at $150 per barrel following escalating tensions between Iran and the United States.
Perhaps the best way to hedge your portfolio against a crash, is to make sure you always have a healthy portion of it allocated to cash. The amount you allocate to cash really depends on how much volatility you are happy to tolerate. More cash means you stand to lose less, but you will probably lose out on returns in the long run. A lower cash balance will probably lead to higher overall returns, but will also mean higher volatility.
The latest swoon, which knocked the S&P 500 down more than 3 percent Wednesday, signaled to many Wall Street pros that the decline was entering a new, more dangerous phase. There’s growing concern now that this decline is more than a garden variety pullback, or drop of 5 percent to 9.99 percent, and could morph into a drop of 10 percent of more for the broad market.
Jump up ^ Coleco Presents The Adam Computer System. May 3, 2016 [1983-09-28]. Event occurs at 44:30. Archived from the original on January 3, 2017. We're doing that with five new television commercials, which have just been completed, and which will be shown in conjunction with the Adam launch date. These commercials are each directed to our target audience, which is composed of our friendly neighborhood children, boys age 8 to 16 and their fathers. We believe those are the two groups that really fuel computer purchases, [boos] and we've directed right at 'em [more boos] - oh, sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry. Women, we've a commercial for you, trust me, but the key point is that our research, which is consumer research, directed that thought [inaudible] from the research, and we've directed our commercials at that target user group.
I don’t even know how many records I own, but it’s in the thousands. I have records, tapes, CDs, and computer files going all the way back to the 1880s. I even have one recording from 1869. A scientist was studying sound waves and recorded a woman singing “Clare De Lune.” He recorded it as wavy lines on a soot-covered paper. Someone recently scanned it and converted it back into sound. It doesn’t sound very good, but it’s amazing that you could retrieve sound from marks on a sooty piece of paper.

We haven’t had an October like this in a very long time.  The Dow Jones Industrial Average was down another 327 points on Thursday, and overall the Dow is now down close to 1,500 points from the peak of the market.  Unlike much of the rest of the world, it is still too early to say that the U.S. is facing a new “financial crisis”, but if stocks continue to plunge like this one won’t be too far away.  And as you will see below, many believe that what we have seen so far is just the start of a huge wave of selling.  Of course it would be extremely convenient for Democrats if stocks did crash, because it would give them a much better chance of doing well in the midterm elections.  This is the most heated midterm election season that I can ever remember, and what U.S. voters choose to do at the polls in November is going to have very serious implications for the immediate future of our country.

This book has lots of good statistical information to back up its premises...which seem to boil down to...Buy a home within your means (and he does define how to find that out, which is a good thing if you can't figure it out on your own)...Anticipate that the home market could go down as interest rates rise making your home harder to sell in a pinch (to his credit, he tells you how to avoid that too)...and a few other common sense rules of buying that could be applied to many things. If a person is going to spend 6 figures on anything, you would think that they would take the time to learn what they are doing, but it is obvious to the author and to many other people watchers in the world that too many people just don't put effort into watching where they put their money. So, if you are a person who carefully spends your money without rushing into any purchase, you probably have enough sense to not have to buy this book; and if you are person who is just the opposite, you probably aren't too concerned even now about learning anything about your home purchase, so you aren't even reading this review. Last note: if you were going to buy properties to use for investment purposes, this book could be of assistance. Hope this helps.
Are supposed to be good foragers and are a solid meat bird and can snag eggs, we dont eat a lot of eggs, hens are supposed to be good brooders for growing the numbers. Am crossing my fingers that they make it, should ship about the middle of this next month, they are selling out quick from what i see on the site, availability changed on successive hatches since i ordered, guess people are buying chickens now.
Though the Trump administration has looked to tariffs to help balance out a huge trade deficit with China, these added costs on aluminum, steel, and potentially other Chinese goods, could come back to haunt businesses and U.S. consumers. As material costs rise as a result of tariffs, businesses have little choice but to pass along these higher costs to consumers. That will likely result in less consumption, and an eventual pullback in spending from businesses, which may lead to a borderline recession.

We continue to see the trend in shares remaining up, as global growth remains solid helping drive good earnings growth and monetary policy remains easy. However, the risk of a correction over the next two months still remains significant given the threats around trade, emerging market contagion, ongoing Fed rate hikes, the Mueller inquiry in the US, the US mid-term elections and Italian budget negotiations. Property price weakness and approaching election uncertainty add to the risks around the Australian share market.
Trying to time a market crash or correction is pretty much impossible, and trying to estimate how much will be lost in that crash is even more difficult. If you had listened to David Haggith’s  doom and gloom warnings back in 2012, you would have missed out on one of the greatest bull runs in history. You also have to realise that permabear “experts” such as Marc Faber exist and that they will constantly make predictions about how the next big market crash is just seconds away. To sum it up: Nobody really knows when it’s going to happen or if it’s worth staying on the sidelines while the market continues to grow upwards. Well, everyone except me of course. I’m 100% certain that a market crash is going to happen in 2018.
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