In 2011 trades by high-frequency traders accounted for 28% of the total volume in the futures markets, which included currencies and commodities, an increase from 22% in 2009. However, the growth of computerized and high-frequency trading in commodities and currencies coincided with a series of "flash crashes" in those markets. The role of human market makers, who match buyers and sellers and provide liquidity to the market, was more and more played by computer programs. If those program traders pulled back from the market, then big "buy" or "sell" orders could have led to sudden, big swings. It would have increased the probability of surprise distortions, as in the equity markets, according to a professional investor.[citation needed] In February 2011, the sugar market took a dive of 6% in just one second. On March 1, 2011, cocoa futures prices dropped 13% in less than a minute on the Intercontinental Exchange. Cocoa plunged $450 to a low of $3,217 a metric ton before rebounding quickly. The U.S. dollar tumbled against the yen on March 16, 2011, falling 5% in minutes, one of its biggest moves ever. According to a former cocoa trader: ' "The electronic platform is too fast; it doesn't slow things down" like humans would. '[81]

2015–16 stock market selloff 18 August 2015 The Dow Jones fell 588 points during a two-day period, 1,300 points from August 18–21. On Monday, August 24, world stock markets were down substantially, wiping out all gains made in 2015, with interlinked drops in commodities such as oil, which hit a six-year price low, copper, and most of Asian currencies, but the Japanese yen, losing value against the United States dollar. With this plunge, an estimated ten trillion dollars had been wiped off the books on global markets since June 3. [30] [31] [32]

Share Market Live: Indian stock markets (Sensex and Nifty) closed lower on Friday facing a knee-jerk reaction in the intraday deals with Sensex closing 280 points lower and Nifty slipping below 11,150. During the day, a market-wide sell-off was seen in stocks with the benchmark Sensex plummetting 1,128 points and Nifty tripping below 10,900. Shares of Yes Bank, collapsed 34% intraday, settled down 29% while DHFL shares ended down 42% after nosediving 60% intraday.
The S&P 500 ended 1999 at  1,469 and was recently at 2,814. That's an increase of 92% -- almost doubling -- over the nearly 19 years represented in the table, and it represents an average annual gain of about 3.5%. That's well below the average annual gain, driving home the lesson that over any particular investment period, your average returns may be well above or below average.
Adjust accordingly. If you have to take some course of action, change the stocks you're buying. Historically, some stock sectors do better than others in declining markets. For example, high-dividend stocks tend to be less volatile than other stocks. They are usually insulated from big bear market drops due to the dividend alone. Sector-wise, utility stocks, consumer cyclicals, service-oriented companies, food and pharmaceutical stocks tend to do better during an economic downturn than other companies. Some stock sectors just tend to outperform others during a bear market. The bad news is that when the market does turn bearish again these stocks won't rise as fast and as high as, say, technology or emerging market stocks.
However, independent studies published in 2013 strongly disputed the last claim.[52][53][54] In particular, in 2011 Andersen and Bondarenko conducted a comprehensive investigation of the two main versions of VPIN used by its creators, one based on the standard tick-rule (or TR-VPIN)[50][55][56] and the other based on Bulk Volume Classification (or BVC-VPIN).[57] They find that the value of TR-VPIN (BVC-VPIN) one hour before the crash "was surpassed on 71 (189) preceding days, constituting 11.7% (31.2%) of the pre-crash sample". Similarly, the value of TR-VPIN (BVC-VPIN) at the start of the crash was "topped on 26 (49) preceding days, or 4.3% (8.1%) of the pre-crash sample."[53]
These Tranche’s were nothing more than whipped cream on chit. Standard & Poors along with Moody knew all too well these loans weren’t as secure as advertised. At the risk of shareholder devaluation they were both falsely applying ratings to all of them. That’s called greed. CDO’S – synthetic CDO’S all in bad. I read it few times and know there are many reputable banks out there. The facts are however, they created and implemented what they could get away with. When the gun fired there was plenty of blame to go around. Now regulation has taken solid control of this and hopefully we will never experience this kind of meltdown again.
In addition, the rapid growth of the video game industry led to an increased demand for video games, but which the manufacturers over-projected. An analyst for Goldman Sachs had stated in 1983 that the demand for video games was up 100% from 1982, but the manufacturing output increased by 175%, creating a surplus in the market.[4] Raymond Kassar, the CEO of Atari, had recognized in 1982 that there would become a point of saturation for the industry, but did not expect this to occur until about half of American households had a video game console; at the time, only about 15 million machines had been sold, far below this expected point.[4]
Terming the crash as a good opportunity to buy these stocks, Madhu Kela of Reliance Capital told ET Now,”Looks like a technical sell-off Their short-term liquidity is very very good; enough liquidity to match liability. Speculative unwinding Long term investor, if you understand the company and faith in management, excellent opportunity to buy these companies; if you think the management is good and will come out stronger, then it’s a good opportunity to buy the shares. Stock markets to worry about the liquidity of companies which have high credit ratings with good liquidity is purely speculative. Even if the interest rates are going up, the lending rates will also go up; to think that either the news is good, or the price is good.”
The video game crash of 1983 (known as the Atari shock in Japan) was a large-scale recession in the video game industry that occurred from 1983 to 1985, primarily in North America. The crash was attributed to several factors, including market saturation in the number of game consoles and available games, and waning interest in console games in favor of personal computers. Revenues peaked at around $3.2 billion in 1983, then fell to around $100 million by 1985 (a drop of almost 97 percent). The crash was a serious event that brought an abrupt end to what is retrospectively considered the second generation of console video gaming in North America.
Hi Lavanya. Some believe the sky over Toronto will fall in 2018, but with rentals disappearing, it’s safe to say rental income property owners will get their price. Prices won’t go down, and may actually boom if the economy takes off in 2018. Buying a rental income property, living in the upper floor and getting tenants to help with the mortgage is just plain smart. That helps with the housing crisis as well! Good luck with your rental property.

Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology suggests that there is evidence the frequency of stock market crashes follows an inverse cubic power law.[15] This and other studies such as Prof. Didier Sornette's work suggest that stock market crashes are a sign of self-organized criticality in financial markets.[16] In 1963, Mandelbrot proposed that instead of following a strict random walk, stock price variations executed a Lévy flight.[17] A Lévy flight is a random walk that is occasionally disrupted by large movements. In 1995, Rosario Mantegna and Gene Stanley analyzed a million records of the S&P 500 market index, calculating the returns over a five-year period.[18] Researchers continue to study this theory, particularly using computer simulation of crowd behaviour, and the applicability of models to reproduce crash-like phenomena.
“My view is that the markets are extremely overvalued, and can fall even 2,000 points from here. (Sensex). The Nifty can correct by about 1,000 points. Nothing has changed fundamentally, I mean we have the same macro-economic situation, etc, but when a sell-off happens, nobody can predict. Financials, especially NBFCs are overvalued,” Rajat Sharma, founder, Sana Securities told FE Online.

We have entered a time when global events appear to be accelerating significantly.  Earlier today, bombs were mailed to major political leaders all over the United States.  In the Middle East, it looks like Israel and Hamas could go to war at any moment.  And we continue to see a rise in major seismic events – including three very large earthquakes that just hit the Cascadia Subduction Zone.
One factor which supports the argument against a property price crash is ongoing strong population growth. Over the year to the March quarter it remained high at 1.6%, which is at the top end of developed countries. As can be seen in the next chart, net overseas migration has become an increasingly important driver of population growth in recent years.

Adding to the problem is that much of the Chinese private debt is pledged with collateral from the stock market, which has been in free-fall this year. According to Reuters, more than 637 billion shares valued at $4.44 trillion yuan ($639.86 billion) were pledged for loans as of Oct. 12. As the air continues to pour out of the stock market, it will put additional pressure on the debt market.
Our deficit and debt as numbers alone are kind of meaningless.. It only matters relative to other countries and relative to our GDP. For better or worse current economic theory under globalization seems to expect every country to grow and amass more debt while keeping those two values in some kind of balance. So it is hard even for an economist to say how relevant the size of the number is. And a lot of that theory is working out rather poorly for many Euro countries right now.
Lana, a lot of people are talking housing crash in many markets, but that could take the whole economy down. Even with a crash, it would still be tough for buyers. The right approach to bring prices down is more housing supply. The governments should provide tax breaks and other incentives for housing development and legislation which promotes new housing projects. Good finding a place you can afford.
Thank you Dan. Congrats on the new member of the family. Yes, so many people are facing the decision to leave the GTA entirely. Might be agonizing at first, but it might be better for your kids. With the Internet, they won’t miss much. What do you think of Calgary? Buy low and and wait for oil to come back? Isn’t that how big fortunes are made? I don’t know of any such lists but perhaps I should make one:). What’s the first place that comes to mind when you think about moving?
In April 2015, Navinder Singh Sarao, a London-based point-and-click trader,[62] was arrested for his alleged role in the flash crash. According to criminal charges brought by the United States Department of Justice, Sarao allegedly used an automated program to generate large sell orders, pushing down prices, which he then cancelled to buy at the lower market prices. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission filed civil charges against Sarao.[63][64] In August 2015, Sarao was released on a £50,000 bail with a full extradition hearing scheduled for September with the US Department of Justice. Sarao and his company, Nav Sarao Futures Limited, allegedly made more than $40 million in profit from trading during the Flash Crash.[65]
Jump up ^ Coleco Presents The Adam Computer System. YouTube. May 3, 2016 [1983-09-28]. Event occurs at 1:06:55. Archived from the original on January 3, 2017. IBM is just not another strong company making a positive statement about the home-computer field's future. IBM is a company that knows how to make money. IBM is a company that knows how to make money in hardware, and makes more money in software. What IBM can bring to the home-computer field is something that the field collectively needs, particularly now: A respect for profitability. A capability to earn money. That is precisely what the field needs ... I look back a year or two in the videogame field, or the home-computer field, how much better everyone was, when most people were making money, rather than very few were making money.
Ok but i understand this, banks were selling Mortages for up to 100 times what they were worth even to foreign investors, right/! Ok then they were loaning the money to sell these mortages right with an interest, whereas, the loanee was paying alot of money to buy a house. right and investors were not investing in the stock market they were investing in the housing market. so then where does unemployment really take off here? why did investors suddenly pull there monies out of jobs? and when did the wealthy decide we all needed an overhaul and that disabled americans needed to go without teeth and glasses for 4 years so that the newly displaced homeowners and unemployed americans could jump on the poverty bandwagon. really!

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