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According to estimates from JPMorgan Chase in June 2017, just 10% of all stock-trading volume is the result of investors picking stocks to buy and sell. The remainder of trading volume primarily derives from quantitative-based computer trading. Essentially, we’re talking about computer programs that aim to secure small profits via high-frequency trading (HFT) hundreds or thousands of times a day.
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Using a simple options calculator (like that available at options-price.com) we can calculate how our put options purchased in the example above would perform after a 20% decline in the span of just a month. In this hypothetical example, SPY drops to 175 and implied volatility rises to 55 (for this example I took the VIX level of 45 in October 2002, as suggested by Spitznagel, and added 10 points for 10% out-of-the-money put options). Our puts have gone from $9 each in value to $328.10. We own 55 of them so they are now worth just over $18,000 in total.


After a one-day recovery on October 30, where the Dow regained an additional 28.40 points, or 12 percent, to close at 258.47, the market continued to fall, arriving at an interim bottom on November 13, 1929, with the Dow closing at 198.60. The market then recovered for several months, starting on November 14, with the Dow gaining 18.59 points to close at 217.28, and reaching a secondary closing peak (i.e., bear market rally) of 294.07 on April 17, 1930. The following year, the Dow embarked on another, much longer, steady slide from April 1931 to July 8, 1932, when it closed at 41.22—its lowest level of the 20th century, concluding an 89 percent loss rate for all of the market's stocks.
At first, while the regulatory agencies and the United States Congress announced investigations into the crash,[16] no specific reason for the six hundred point plunge was identified. Investigators focused on a number of possible causes, including a confluence of computer-automated trades, or possibly an error by human traders. By the first weekend, regulators had discounted the possibility of trader error and focused on automated trades conducted on exchanges other than the NYSE. However, CME Group, a large futures exchange, stated that, insofar as stock index futures traded on CME Group were concerned, its investigation found no evidence for this or that high-frequency trading played a role, and in fact concluded that automated trading had contributed to market stability during the period of the crash.[17] Others speculate that an intermarket sweep order may have played a role in triggering the crash.[18]
The benchmark S&P BSE Sensex swung from a 1 percent gain to a drop of as much as 3 percent -- its wildest intraday move in more than four years -- before closing with a 0.8 percent loss. Friday’s declines showed that investors remain jittery about Indian financial shares after a recent default by Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services Ltd. shook confidence in the sector.
In 2011 high-frequency traders moved away from the stock market as there had been lower volatility and volume. The combined average daily trading volume in the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market in the first four months of 2011 fell 15% from 2010, to an average of 6.3 billion shares a day. Trading activities declined throughout 2011, with April's daily average of 5.8 billion shares marking the lowest month since May 2008. Sharp movements in stock prices, which were frequent during the period from 2008 to the first half of 2010, were in a decline in the Chicago Board Options Exchange volatility index, the VIX, which fell to its lowest level in April 2011 since July 2007.[83]

BMO’s senior economist Benjamin Tal said in a Toronto Star report on October 14th, the Ontario Government’s Places to Grow program was primarily responsible for the fast rising prices in the GTA market. He also suggests other red tape factors worsened the situation. Prices in Newmarket, Markham, Mississauga, Richmond Hill, Bradford East Gwillimbury and Aurora have definitly crashed.
Some enduring red flags, Filia said, are in the form of politics and geopolitics — growing populism across Europe as well as Middle East and Asian tensions. But more than that he sees shrinking liquidity — central bank spending flows in reverse for the first time in a decade — as the "first real crash test" for momentum and volatility, as well as rising interest rates.
When Tobin’s Q is in its uppermost quartile, as it is today, it suggests this reward/risk equation is not at all favorable for investors. In other words, these “fat tails” get even fatter during these periods thus investors should look to hedge their portfolios against large declines. And this is precisely the “asset inflation” Taleb was referring to in the interview mentioned at the top of this post.
Now started the preparations for reforms to revive the market and pull it out from the huge crisis. The first and foremost reform that was suggested was the uniformity of the margin requirements. This was done so that the volatility of the stocks, stock options and index features could be reduced. Also, the installation of new computer systems was suggested so that the market could be pulled out from these difficult times as soon as possible. These computer systems that were newly installed in the stock exchanges needed just a single keystroke to enter the trade. Earlier this work would be tiresome and needed almost 25 keystrokes. These new computer systems rejected the trade if a wrong input was made. Those ways these computers helped increase the efficiency of data management. They also helped to minimize errors and maximize productivity. Overall these new computer systems were helping to manage the data with much ease decreasing chances of mistakes to a great extent.
When you think of oil production, the Middle East or OPEC is probably what comes to mind. But substantial shale finds in the United States in recent decades have pushed the nation the No. 3 spot in terms of daily production as of 2016, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. At 8.88 million barrels of oil production per day, the U.S. is responsible for more than 10% of global production. 
The transition to a US centered economy puts the country into a vulnerable period of uncertainty and GDP risk. Companies are hoarding products from China right now while the tariff is 10%, but on January 1st 2019, it will be 25% and that should stop imports completely, especially if the US dollar should weaken. Will companies build factories here or instead hold off and hope for a Trump loss in 2020?
Sensex and Nifty observed a major crash in the afternoon trade today following a sharp fall in housing finance stocks. However, benchmark indices soon rebounded as Sensex recovered nearly 900 points after falling over 1,100 points and Nifty reclaimed 11,100-level within a matter of minutes in afternoon session. The 30-share index fell 1127.58 points, or 3.03 percent, to hit an intra-day low of 35,993.64. The index was trading 171.39 points, or 0.46 percent, lower at 36,949.83 at the time of reporting.
For example, the United States has a set of thresholds in place to guard against crashes. If the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) falls 2,400 points (threshold 2) before 1:00 p.m., the market will be frozen for an hour. If it falls below 3,600 points (threshold 3), the market closes for the day. Other countries have similar measures in place. The problem with this method today is that if one stock exchange closes, shares can often still be bought or sold in other exchanges, which can cause the preventative measures to backfire.
By the end of October, stock markets had fallen in Hong Kong (45.5%), Australia (41.8%), Spain (31%), the United Kingdom (26.45%), the United States (22.68%) and Canada (22.5%). New Zealand's market was hit especially hard, falling about 60% from its 1987 peak, and would take several years to recover.[5][6] The damage to the New Zealand economy was compounded by high exchange rates and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand's refusal to loosen monetary policy in response to the crisis, in contrast to countries such as West Germany, Japan and the United States, whose banks increased short-term liquidity to forestall recession and would experience economic growth in the following 2–3 years.[7]

“Hedging” simply means protecting your portfolio from just this sort of “fat tail” event. Taleb is an advisor to a hedge fund which specializes in “tail hedging.” The fund is run by Mark Spitznagel who wrote a book a few years ago called “The Dao of Capital” in which he argues there are times when stocks present very poor potential returns along with very high risk. His preferred gauge for this is Tobin’s Q (see: Why ‘Tobin’s Q’ Should Make You More Cautious Towards The Stock Market Today).


The stock market crash of 1929 – considered the worst economic event in world history – began on Thursday, October 24, 1929, with skittish investors trading a record 12.9 million shares. On October 28, dubbed “Black Monday,” the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged nearly 13 percent. The market fell another 12 percent the next day, “Black Tuesday.” While the crisis send shock waves across the financial world, there were numerous signs that a stock market crash was coming. What exactly caused the crash – and could it have been prevented?
When you think of oil production, the Middle East or OPEC is probably what comes to mind. But substantial shale finds in the United States in recent decades have pushed the nation the No. 3 spot in terms of daily production as of 2016, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. At 8.88 million barrels of oil production per day, the U.S. is responsible for more than 10% of global production. 
I am one of the victims of this mess. Bought new home Jan. 2006. By 2010 my Mortgage was sold and re-sold 4 times without anyone telling me or asking me for my permission. Just got a notice that my monthly auto payment was denied. Checking with the bank there was a new Financial Facility owning my home and wanting that payment. Also, from the first bank with the Mortgage, to the 4th Bank with the Mortgage, each of them, (1 was Natl. City Bank) also sold and went under moving my Accounts with my Money each time. Again without my approval or knowledge. I am now 66 trying to get a Harp Loan with lower interest rate while on Social Security and I’m told I can’t because my loan shows it is only 5 years old and it is really 10 years old. I’m screwed and will have to sell now at this time of life because I was a pawn on the board of this crappy game they all played and have to pay the price. NOT FAIR AT ALL!!!
Shares of tech companies, including the so-called FAANG stocks – Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google-parent Alphabet – have been market darlings for years. So when a sell-off gains steam, the stocks with the biggest gains are among the ones that investors sell first to lock in profits. Tech stocks have also been caught in the trade fight with China, as Trump's tough stance on Beijing is causing disruptions in their supply chain. Technology companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Alphabet are also facing intense regulatory scrutiny from the U.S. government.

“My sense is that the bottom that we were unable to find, chances are that we have found it. Often things tend to panic and sell of, unless it’s a black swan event My sense is that whatever information is there is not so serious; may be a couple of stocks may remain dicey but overall if there is no systemic risk, what we are doing is we are buying back nifty now; because it’s not like the whole world is coming to an end May be there is a problem; it can be contained; but once the news is out that news is irrelevant. Given that we are now near the 200-DMA, we could now have that sustainable rally. There is no value in worrying about what’s gone wrong. Try to buy because prices tend to factor in most things. My sense is that by the close we should recover some more Buy the good quality NBFCs, such as Bajaj Finance, L&T finance I would be a buyer now that the fall is already over,” investment advisor Ashwini Gujral told CNBC TV18.
Many of these Toronto neighbourhoods are in such strategic locations for employment, that given the housing shortage, urban intensification, poor transit and roadways, that the condos and homes in them will never see a significant price drop. The events of the last 3 months with the Liberal’s fair housing act was an acid test. These Toronto neighbourhoods look to be the best neighbourhoods for safe real estate investment.
The housing market experienced modest but steady growth from the period of 1995 to 1999. When the stock market crashed in 2000, there was a shift in dollars going away from the stock market into housing. To further fuel the housing bubble there was plenty of cheap money available for new loans in the wake of the economic recession. The federal reserve and banks praised the housing market for helping to create wealth and provide a secured asset that people could borrow money to help the economy grow. There was a lot of financial innovation at the time which included all sorts of new lending types such as interest adjustable loans, interest-only loans and zero down loans. As people saw housing prices going up, they were stepping over each other to buy to get in on the action. Some were flipping homes in an effort to take advantage of market conditions. If you understand fractional banking, you would know that with a 10% reserve requirement, in theory, it would mean that 10 times that money can be created for each dollar. With 0% down needed to buy new homes, an unlimited supply of money could be created. With each loan, banks would quickly securitize the loan and pass the risk off to someone else. Rating agencies put AAA ratings on these loans that made them highly desirable to foreign investors and pension funds. The total amount of derivatives held by the financial institutions exploded and the total % cash reserves grew smaller and smaller. In large areas of CA and FL, there were multiple years of prices going up 20% per year. Some markets like Las Vegas saw the housing market climb up 40% in just one year. In California, over ½ of the new loans were interest only or negative-amortization. From 2003 to 2007 the number of subprime loans had increased a whopping 292% from 332 billion to 1.3 trillion.
You have to pay ~2.5-4% in unavoidable ownership fees as an owner even with your mortgage paid off (property taxes, insurance, maintenance, amortized transaction costs, etc). Even if we’re generous and assume that’s just 2.5%, that means all that that equity is only making you 2.5% (1.5% in Vancouver) in rent savings. If you don’t have the equity, you have to pay more than than to borrow it from the bank (or take on the risk of paying more). If you do and you invest it, then that can be substantial savings.
Personally, I believe that the S&P 500 will bounce back on Friday, but that doesn’t mean that the crisis is over.  Remember, some of the best days in stock market history happened right in the middle of the financial crisis of 2008.  During market panics, we should expect to see dramatic ups and downs.  When markets are calm, that is good news for stocks, but when markets start swinging wildly that is usually a sign to start heading for the exits.
The S&P BSE Sensex surged 368 points on Friday, the recovery after 970-point fall in this week earlier, to a day's high of 37,489.24 tracking the strongness in Indian rupee value against US dollar, lower crude oil prices, government's directive to oil marketers to book future prices of crude oil and positive Asian cues. Shares of ICICI Bank, Reliance Industries, HDFC Bank, ITC, Axis Bank, HDFC and SBI were the biggest positive point contributors to the benchmark index, as these stocks collectively added about 350 points. 
For a few years now, the reason for fast rising home prices have been blamed on tight inventory. After seeing what has happened in Toronto, I’m starting to question these claims of tight inventory in almost all major housing markets (US and globally). In Toronto, within two weeks, they went from having very low inventory to having a 50% increase. Where did all of their extra inventory come from? Could the same happen to other major cities as well? It’s possible that there are low inventory in so many places due to aggressive investor speculation, which is then causing locals to panic buy. Very similar to the irrational exuberance happening before the housing crash 10 years ago. Something can trigger these property investors to sell all at the same time, and cause buyers to pull back, similar to what’s happening in Toronto. Another housing crash is possible, and it doesn’t have to be caused by bad loans like last time.
With IL&FS getting closer to an absolute liquidity crunch and defaulting on its ICDs and CPs, the RBI has started tightening the vigilance on banks and other financial institutions. For starters, the RBI asked banks to be cautious about buying HFC bonds considering their exposure to IL&FS debt. IL&FS has outstanding debt to the tune of $12.5 billion and the market is rife with news that most of the HFCs have large exposure to IL&FS debt. Of course, the promoters of Indiabulls and DHFL have denied any exposure but the news refuses to go away. The mood was also sourced by a large Indian mutual fund selling DHFL bonds in the market at an above-market yield of almost 11%. That also took its toll on the markets.
PropertyUpdate.com.au is Australia's leading property investment wealth creation website with tips, advice and strategies from leading real estate investment experts. Featuring topics like property investment, property development (helping you understand the process), negative gearing and finance (so you can borrow more from the banks), property tax (allowing you to structure for legal tax deductions and asset protections), negotiation, property management (assisting landlords and tenants understand their right responsibilities), commercial property (for experienced property investment individuals), personal development and the psychology of property investment success.
A sudden sell-off was seen in most of the NBFCs (Non-Banking Finance Companies) with DHFL plummetting as much as 45%. In the Nifty Financial Services index, 14 of 20 stocks fell into negative territory with Indiabulls Housing Finance losing more than 11% followed by Shriram Transport Finance (down 6%), Edelweiss Financial Services (down 4%), Bajaj Finserv & Bajaj Finance, down 4%, M&M Financial Services down 4%. 
IMF has cut global growth forecasts for 2018 and 2019, saying that the US-China trade war was taking a toll and emerging markets were struggling with tighter liquidity and capital outflows. IMF in an update to its World Economic Outlook predicted a 3.7 per cent global growth in 2018 and 2019, down from its July forecast of 3.9 per cent growth for both years.

For a few years now, the reason for fast rising home prices have been blamed on tight inventory. After seeing what has happened in Toronto, I’m starting to question these claims of tight inventory in almost all major housing markets (US and globally). In Toronto, within two weeks, they went from having very low inventory to having a 50% increase. Where did all of their extra inventory come from? Could the same happen to other major cities as well? It’s possible that there are low inventory in so many places due to aggressive investor speculation, which is then causing locals to panic buy. Very similar to the irrational exuberance happening before the housing crash 10 years ago. Something can trigger these property investors to sell all at the same time, and cause buyers to pull back, similar to what’s happening in Toronto. Another housing crash is possible, and it doesn’t have to be caused by bad loans like last time.


The past week saw “risk on” with the latest escalation in the US/China trade conflict being less than feared. This saw shares rally, bond yields rise, commodity prices gain, the US$ fall and the A$ rise. US shares rose 0.9%, Eurozone shares gained 2.1%, Japanese shares rose 3.4%, Chinese shares rose 5.2% and Australian shares rose 0.5%. While the Australian share market participated in the global share market rebound, over the last week it has gone back to underperforming again, reflecting its relatively defensive/high-yield characteristics.
It looks like it could be another tough week for global financial markets.  As the week began, markets were down all over the world, and relations between the United States and Saudi Arabia have taken a sudden turn for the worse.  That could potentially mean much, much higher oil prices, and needless to say that would be a very bad thing for the U.S. economy.  It has really surprised many of us how dramatically events have begun to accelerate here in the month of October, and the mood on Wall Street has taken a decidedly negative turn.  Yes, U.S. stocks did bounce back a bit on Friday (as I correctly anticipated), but it was much less of a bounce than many investors were hoping for.  And this week got off to a rough start with all of the major markets in Asia down significantly…

Refraining from tinkering with your portfolio, or even making dramatic changes such as fleeing to cash or switching to different investments altogether, may be challenging at times. That can especially be the case when the market appears to be going haywire and every news story and TV financial show you see seems to suggest that the market is on the verge of Armageddon.


The Roaring Twenties, the decade that followed World War I that led to the crash,[3] was a time of wealth and excess. Building on post-war optimism, rural Americans migrated to the cities in vast numbers throughout the decade with the hopes of finding a more prosperous life in the ever-growing expansion of America's industrial sector.[4] While the American cities prospered, the overproduction of agricultural produce created widespread financial despair among American farmers throughout the decade.[4] This would later be blamed as one of the key factors that led to the 1929 stock market crash.[5]
Everyone seems to have an explanation for why stock prices rise and fall. People are happy about the economy. People are worried about the economy. People want interest rates to rise. People want interest rates to fall. Europe looks good. Europe looks bad. Canada's raising tariffs. Canada reported extraordinary growth. Company A met its earnings goals. Company B didn't. Inflation numbers looked bad. Inflation numbers looked good. Gold is hot. Silver prices fell. Oil supplies are running low—or high. Unemployment numbers changed too much or too little. Euros went up against the dollar. Who knows?
Shares of tech companies, including the so-called FAANG stocks – Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google-parent Alphabet – have been market darlings for years. So when a sell-off gains steam, the stocks with the biggest gains are among the ones that investors sell first to lock in profits. Tech stocks have also been caught in the trade fight with China, as Trump's tough stance on Beijing is causing disruptions in their supply chain. Technology companies such as Facebook, Twitter and Alphabet are also facing intense regulatory scrutiny from the U.S. government.
Meanwhile, domestic stock markets were closed on Thursday on account of Muharram. On Wednesday, the indices ended on a lower note. The S&P BSE Sensex settled at 37,121.22, down 169.45 points and the Nifty50 index of the National Stock Exchange (NSE) ended at 11,234.35, with a loss of 44.55 points. This was the lowest closing levels for markets since late July. (With agencies inputs)
The 1987 Stock Market Crash was really huge and resulted in millions of people to lose wealth. The reforms that were introduced needed to be strictly followed so that the market could get over the losses soon. To date, the 1987 stock market crash is mentioned to be one of worst crashes in the history of stock trading. After the 1929 stock market crash this was the biggest crash to occur resulting in a huge loss.

"Charlie and I view the marketable common stocks that Berkshire owns as interests in businesses, not as ticker symbols to be bought or sold based on their 'chart' patterns, the 'target' prices of analysts or the opinions of media pundits. Instead, we simply believe that if the businesses of the investees are successful (as we believe most will be) our investments will be successful as well."
Nifty and the Sensex saw a sharp correction on Friday, the last trading day of the week as financials rocked the Nifty boat. The Sensex at one point of time was down by over 1000 points and the Nifty had plunged below the 11,000 mark before semblance of sanity returned to the markets. There were 5 principal factors behind the sharp crash in the market on Friday.
Thanks for writing the article. It makes some sense. but how about if the amounts are very different? I am currently considering selling my home which will now sell for $1.7 mil. when I purchased 6 years ago it was just under $600k. a 20% drop would be a gain of $340k which would be nice. But the main reason I would consider selling is to re purpose the tax free gains and invest in a range of different investments. I never intended for my house to be an investment tool, but as it has given me such large gains it seems foolish not to take them. In the perhaps 5% to 10% chance the housing market does continue to soar upwards then I guess I’ll never own again! but I will still have considerable assets that will secure me for life.
It look really bad in 2012 and I took everything and pushed it conservative. Bad timing. I wasn’t thinking and I wasn’t looking at the charts. I am now and I know exactly what to do. I retire in just about 15 years. By then, if we don’t have a full on collapse, I expect to be STINKING RICH. Everyone could be. All you have to do is look at the charts. The right ones of course. I’ve been sworn to secrecy and that is all the clue I will give, but, suffice it to say that there is a pattern that even a monkey could see if he looked.

I have good reasons why i prep. I just dont have any confidence in govenment and am no convinved that covernment and city officials, etites etc are busy sitting around worry thier entitles asses off worry about me not eating or having a hard time. Or i am being too paranoid. Agency ass clowns think that you all are so dumb to relax and so that they can steer thinking by convine shtf-effers that i have bad grammar and can’t spell.
If the market went down, is it because one company changed its business model or its forecasts? Because a mutual fund changed its strategy? Because a glitch triggered a wave of selling? Because yesterday it went up a lot and people decided to take their profits and invest elsewhere? Because one large investor decided to cash out on high valuations? Because another round of stock options for Facebook employees matured, and they sold? On the whole, we can't say why the market went down today is due to a single reason.

But don’t be paranoid either over the inaction. In fact, certain individual stocks are apparently overvalued with unreasonable PE ratios – including Amazon (AMZN) and Netflix (NFLX) – that have the right ingredients to form a bubble. Now don’t get this wrong. We are not saying that Amazon or Netflix is a bubble, but given a potential crash, it would be wise to stay away from overvalued stocks.
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