The following day, Black Tuesday, was a day of chaos. Forced to liquidate their stocks because of margin calls, overextended investors flooded the exchange with sell orders. The Dow fell 30.57 points to close at 230.07 on that day. The glamour stocks of the age saw their values plummet. Across the two days, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 23% – from Wikipedia
Though we don't know what will motivate a future market crash, it's likely to be something that will ultimately be recovered from if history is any guide. The economy and society are very flexible. Industries, and even countries, can rise and fall over time, but if you have a global, well-diversified and lower cost portfolio, then you should be well-positioned. This is an area where diversification helps. If you spread your bets it will likely help. You'll probably find that the next crisis centers on a specific country, part of the globe or investment theme. If you've spread your bets through diversification, then you'll undoubtedly have some assets that fall in value, perhaps alarmingly, but often certain assets can do well during certain crises such as high-quality bonds, more defensive or inexpensive parts of the stock market, or commodities including gold.

In July 2008, the crisis threatened government-sponsored agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. They required a government bailout. The Treasury Department guaranteed $25 billion of their loans and bought shares of Fannie's and Freddie's stock. The Federal Housing Authority guaranteed $300 billion in new loans. On July 15, the Dow fell to 10,962.54. It rebounded and remained above 11,000 for the rest of the summer.

There is no numerically specific definition of a stock market crash but the term commonly applies to steep double-digit percentage losses in a stock market index over a period of several days. Crashes are often distinguished from bear markets by panic selling and abrupt, dramatic price declines. Bear markets are periods of declining stock market prices that are measured in months or years. Crashes are often associated with bear markets, however, they do not necessarily go hand in hand. The crash of 1987, for example, did not lead to a bear market. Likewise, the Japanese bear market of the 1990s occurred over several years without any notable crashes.


As a former portfolio manager, I have seen many hedges for your portfolio. From buying puts to selling calls and using a myriad of ETFs, the choices in the hedging world are limitless.  Now with Bitcoin we need to see if this proves to be a flight to quality in the times of panic.  The best example would be to look at the events around Brexit last year. We saw a major flight to quality, and many managers chose to grab some downside protection.
It’s surprising how unruffled homeowner’s were in the GTA during the trade negotiations, however if you check out the city prices of each city below you can see who was panicking. Aurora, where Magna auto parts is headquartered saw detached home prices plummet $173,000 last month. In one month, in Toronto central where homes are most expensive, we saw an uncharacteristic drop of $111,000. Other districts saw rises so it could be those sellers bought in less expensive areas. See the district stats chart.
Analysts say it's possible about 1 million barrels could be off the market by year-end. A much larger amount would squeeze supply and affect prices, Harris said. Already, companies have announced that they will step back from dealing with Iran, and Harris said the sanctions could create tensions between the U.S. and five countries that remain in the Iran nuclear deal. The U.S. broke from that group and decided on its own to reapply sanctions.
US data remains strong. Manufacturing conditions remained strong in the New York and Philadelphia regions and the Markit manufacturing PMI rose, the Conference Board’s leading indicator is continuing to rise, and jobless claims fell further. Housing-related data, like starts, permits and sales, doesn’t have a lot of momentum but it’s consistent with a flat/modest contribution to economic growth and at least it’s a long way from the pre-GFC housing boom that went bust.
i would completely disagree with you on the lending to people who should not have gotten loans part. I was a person who got a loan during that time. I made all my payments, but it was a stated income loan with almost no verification of income. I basically said I want to buy a house for this much and they said okay. Things are so much different now.
I have good reasons why i prep. I just dont have any confidence in govenment and am no convinved that covernment and city officials, etites etc are busy sitting around worry thier entitles asses off worry about me not eating or having a hard time. Or i am being too paranoid. Agency ass clowns think that you all are so dumb to relax and so that they can steer thinking by convine shtf-effers that i have bad grammar and can’t spell.

Obviously, if the market crashes, it's a good time to go shopping for bargains. The stocks tied to lots of wonderful businesses are likely to be depressed -- perhaps significantly so. But if you don't have some ready cash (or access to cash) to take advantage of that, you could be out of luck. Or you might find yourself selling out of some stocks at depressed prices (thus realizing losses or shrunken gains) in order to snap up shares of more compelling stocks. That's not ideal.
It is not a big surprise, however, that many investors today remain interested in the forecasts of financial analysts regardless of their success. Humans in the past consulted oracles, crystal balls and tea leaves. It’s in our nature: As the proverb goes, “tell me a fact, and I'll learn; tell me a truth, and I’ll believe; but tell me a story and it will live in my heart forever.” We are attracted to story-telling, and when it comes to investing we seem to be searching for the most compelling narratives about the unknowable future, regardless of how accurate they turn out to be.
Since the crashes of 1929 and 1987, safeguards have been put in place to prevent crashes due to panicked stockholders selling their assets. Such safeguards include trading curbs, or circuit breakers, which prevent any trade activity whatsoever for a certain period of time following a sharp decline in stock prices, in hopes of stabilizing the market and preventing it from falling further.

Second, given that the effect of tariffs is to make imported goods more expensive so as to reduce the amount of goods imported, China may retaliate by imposing its own tariffs. Who knows what those will be? Whatever the case, this will make US goods less attractive in Chinese markets, and US companies relying on sales in China will end up making less money.
Scenario:  Big money chases few homes, and when governments persist in stopping or not supporting land development, speculators become more confident prices will rise further. Then a politician or FED president steps in with their reactive solution, at the end of the business cycle where employment and profits will begin to drop. Speculators/investors pull out fast, and the slide begins.
Our deficit and debt as numbers alone are kind of meaningless.. It only matters relative to other countries and relative to our GDP. For better or worse current economic theory under globalization seems to expect every country to grow and amass more debt while keeping those two values in some kind of balance. So it is hard even for an economist to say how relevant the size of the number is. And a lot of that theory is working out rather poorly for many Euro countries right now.

With IL&FS getting closer to an absolute liquidity crunch and defaulting on its ICDs and CPs, the RBI has started tightening the vigilance on banks and other financial institutions. For starters, the RBI asked banks to be cautious about buying HFC bonds considering their exposure to IL&FS debt. IL&FS has outstanding debt to the tune of $12.5 billion and the market is rife with news that most of the HFCs have large exposure to IL&FS debt. Of course, the promoters of Indiabulls and DHFL have denied any exposure but the news refuses to go away. The mood was also sourced by a large Indian mutual fund selling DHFL bonds in the market at an above-market yield of almost 11%. That also took its toll on the markets.
Asian stock markets rose on Friday after Wall Street hit a new high and a survey showed Japanese manufacturing accelerating, an AP report said. Tokyo's Nikkei 225 rose 0.5% to 23,793.35, Hong Kong's Hang Seng added 0.9% to 27,712.47, China's Shanghai Composite Index climbed 0.3%, erasing earlier losses, to 2,737.27 while Seoul's Kospi was up 0.2% at 2,327.87. 
There are limits to examining historical data too. Nassim Taleb cites the error of believing that the highest mountain you’ve seen is the tallest. It’s far more likely that the tallest mountain is one you haven’t seen yet. In the same way with market crashes, we can look at market declines over different geographies and time periods, but it does not mean that there is necessarily any sort of hard limit there.
Personally, I believe that the S&P 500 will bounce back on Friday, but that doesn’t mean that the crisis is over.  Remember, some of the best days in stock market history happened right in the middle of the financial crisis of 2008.  During market panics, we should expect to see dramatic ups and downs.  When markets are calm, that is good news for stocks, but when markets start swinging wildly that is usually a sign to start heading for the exits.
Share Market Live: Indian stock markets (Sensex and Nifty) closed lower on Friday facing a knee-jerk reaction in the intraday deals with Sensex closing 280 points lower and Nifty slipping below 11,150. During the day, a market-wide sell-off was seen in stocks with the benchmark Sensex plummetting 1,128 points and Nifty tripping below 10,900. Shares of Yes Bank, collapsed 34% intraday, settled down 29% while DHFL shares ended down 42% after nosediving 60% intraday.
HELL ONFRICKING EARTH AND THE END OF ALL LIFE ON EARTH AS WE KNOW IT IS NOW LITERALLY UP IN OUR FACES, JESUS HELP OUR SORRY ASSES THAT WE are in the 3-5,000,000 shtf survivors. Then comes Planet X, Nibiru showing up in April 2016, tips the poles on the plante 24′, erases the planets magnetic field, meltdown the ice caps and causes 1000 mph fu.///i…g winds trashing up the entire city centers of the all countries of the globe. Flooding, windstorm, hail, Hurricane, sunamis, etc, Crop destruction, anmimals running and migrating to the center of the Country to safe areas, futher depleting animal stocks in coastline cites, leaving the only avaible meat source to eat, fat, larger over women and men who did not prep, now the new food source to sustain the Dred Lock and lantino, ganstar drug dealing survivors.
If you are concerned about how much you could lose on some of your largest positions, you can also think about using stop loss orders to mitigate potential losses. For each stock, you can set a few price levels below technical support where you will begin to reduce the size of the position. It’s best to do this long before stock prices begin to fall so that your decisions are rational and not driven by emotions. Stop losses are not generally a strategy used by long term investors. However, they can help you manage the emotional pain of a bear market.

Its pretty obvious she's completely failed. She may as well have said she never wrote the current Brexit deal, Barnier did or Merkel did. In more enlightened times her head would be on a spike by now, down by the Thames. But what do we expect from just the latest traitor to Sovereignty on the list, that includes: Heath, Major, Brown and the rest . . We need a new broom to sweep all this rubbish away, once and for all . .
The Dow was already down 20 percent from its September 3 high, according to Yahoo Finance DJIA Historical Prices. That signaled a bear market. In late September, investors had been worried about massive declines in the British stock market. Investors in Clarence Hatry's company lost billions when they discovered he used fraudulent collateral to buy United Steel. A few days later, Great Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer, Philip Snowden, described America's stock market as "a perfect orgy of speculation." The next day, U.S. newspapers agreed.
All the main stock indexes of the future G7 bottomed out between September and December 1974, having lost at least 34% of their value in nominal terms and 43% in real terms.[1] In all cases, the recovery was a slow process. Although West Germany's market was the fastest to recover, returning to the original nominal level within eighteen months, it did not return to the same real level until June 1985.[1] The United Kingdom didn't return to the same market level until May 1987 (only a few months before the Black Monday crash), whilst the United States didn't see the same level in real terms until August 1993, over twenty years after the 1973–74 crash began.[1]
A market collapse can wipe out what economists call "paper wealth." Paper wealth is money tied up in investments like the stock market or the real estate market that could be sold for a gain, but hasn't yet. In contrast, "real wealth" refers to actual, physical assets, like the money in your bank account, or a vehicle you own that is fully paid off and can be sold for a definite financial gain.

And just when you think that this may all be a bunch of bul…h…t. A free energy inventer gets a phone call from a Tv morning show, calling him raising hell on his ass telling him, that he needs to buy up all the free energy electrical devices now, the free energy inventor declines his offer, Host hangs up on him pissed and then calls him back asking him nicely if he could allow him to send him a truck to empty his entire store inventory, the owner declines. Store owner inventor is told by said talk show host, that the elites are getting everything in place to plug the plug. Its obvious that its a planned calapse. The inventor tells us that we will be needing electicity to power up devices, because he was told that the grid will go down, and obvious planned EMP ATTACK on all our major cites, “planned” it seems.


But what about the risk of a property price crash as suggested by the recent Sixty Minutes report? Several things are worth noting in relation to this: predictions of a 30-50% property price crash have been wheeled out regularly in Australian media over the last decade including on Sixty Minutes; the anecdotes of mortgage stress and defaults don’t line up well with actual data showing low levels of arrears; borrowers have already been moving from interest only to principle and interest loans over the last few years, without a lot of stress; and the 40-45% price fall call on the program was “if everything turns against us”. Our view remains that in the absence of much higher interest rates, much higher unemployment, or a multi-year supply surge (none of which are expected) a property crash is unlikely. But the risks are now greater than when property crash calls started to be made a decade or so ago and so deeper price falls than the 15% top to bottom fall we expect for Sydney and Melbourne are a high risk. This is particularly so given the risk that post the Royal Commission bank lending standards become excessively tight, negative gearing is restricted and the capital gains tax discount is halved after a change in government in Canberra. There is also a big risk that FOMO (fear of missing out) becomes FONGO (fear of not getting out) for some.
Since Trump has already started a trade war with China and wouldn’t dare attack nuclear-armed North Korea, his last best target would be Iran. By provoking a military confrontation with that country, he would trigger a stagflationary geopolitical shock not unlike the oil-price spikes of 1973, 1979 and 1990. Needless to say, that would make the oncoming global recession even more severe.
Good harvests had built up a mass of 250 million bushels of wheat to be "carried over" when 1929 opened. By May there was also a winter-wheat crop of 560 million bushels ready for harvest in the Mississippi Valley. This oversupply caused a drop in wheat prices so heavy that the net incomes of the farming population from wheat were threatened with extinction. Stock markets are always sensitive to the future state of commodity markets, and the slump in Wall Street predicted for May by Sir George Paish arrived on time. In June 1929, the position was saved by a severe drought in the Dakotas and the Canadian West, plus unfavorable seed times in Argentina and eastern Australia. The oversupply would now be wanted to fill the big gaps in the 1929 world wheat production. From 97¢ per bushel in May, the price of wheat rose to $1.49 in July. When it was seen that at this figure American farmers would get rather more for their smaller crop than for that of 1928, stocks went up again.

If you break up the components of the correction, the entire fall was concentrated in financials and other sectors where there are valuation concerns. Even within the large cap space, the correction was sharpest in stocks like Kotak Bank, Adani Ports, Bajaj Finserv, Bajaj Finance etc where there already are valuation concerns. The basket selling was largely restricted to stocks like Yes Bank, Indiabulls and DHFL, which were in the news as well as stocks where valuation concerns have been around for quite some time.


If you could only listen to one person's advice during a stock market crash, let that person be famed investor, Warren Buffett. Not only will the Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-B) (NYSE: BRK-A) chairman and CEO's advice serve you well, but his knack for keeping a clear head -- and even getting a bit greedy (more on that later) -- when everyone else is selling, may make his the only advice you need to navigate uncertain times.
Over time, we can correlate historical trends in the stock market to the global business cycle. When times are good, stocks as a whole tend to go up—bull markets. When times are bad, stocks as a whole tend to go down—bear markets. This doesn't predict the behavior of any individual company's stock over time, however, nor does it suggest what any stock will do on any given day.
If you could only listen to one person's advice during a stock market crash, let that person be famed investor, Warren Buffett. Not only will the Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-B) (NYSE: BRK-A) chairman and CEO's advice serve you well, but his knack for keeping a clear head -- and even getting a bit greedy (more on that later) -- when everyone else is selling, may make his the only advice you need to navigate uncertain times.

Perhaps the likeliest reason for the next stock market crash could be an escalating trade spat between the United States and China. After the U.S. initially placed tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods, China retaliated with tariffs of its own on an equal value of imported U.S. goods. Now the two sides are threatening to one-up the other with tariffs.


The Canadian government hasn’t come up with a plan to stop investment money fleeing to “low tax” United States.  The US economy and the US stock market and USD have all soared with Trump’s strategy. With the border blocked, there will be no reason to invest in Canada. Trudeau has refused to look at tax reductions. That has severe implications for the financial markets here.
Thanks Ben. If I knew I’d be rich! Yes, everyone’s looking ahead to 2019 and I’m developing a post on the topic right now. We likely won’t see a crash anytime soon, unless the G7 get carried away by all the tariff talk. Which could happen. The rest of the world has become addicted to US spending, although they describe that as “beneficial interdependent trade.” They’re actually getting surly about it, (G7 meeting) so we can’t say this won’t escalate into something bad. It looks like they’re going to threaten Trump with Tariffs and numbers and see if he bites. He hasn’t even dealt with China yet, so this does look scary. As you said, prices are rising and the demand is there. As long as Millennials are able to buy, this boom could go on a long time. However, how many of the G7 would enjoy seeing the US economy plummet?

In a sense, it's understandable why panic occurs. In fact, one key ingredient for crashes is often panicked investors. First off, there is typically something big and scary associated with a crash. Yet, it's often temporary. It's important to remember that the markets have endured world wars, nuclear weapons, disease epidemics, inflation spikes, mass unemployment and presidential assassinations and in each case global markets have generally come back to make new highs.
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