Is funny, the tropical depression is well away from us but we are getting an extremely wet weather system over the state, they call it an anti-cyclone, whatever that is, all i know is i could use some sunshine, been raining for weeks, only one or two days here and there that didnt rain. Too damn wet, crops rotting in the field, at least the market crops, oh well, such is life as a farmer!
But you should also crunch a few numbers and then do a little soul searching. Estimate how Vanguard's suggested mix would have performed during the late 2007-through-early 2009 slump, when stock prices declined nearly 60% in value and investment-grade bonds gained about 7%. If you think you would cave and begin selling in the face of such a loss, you might want to dial back your target stock position a bit.
So, the way to prepare for a market crash is not necessarily to artfully predict in advance, and step aside when the crash comes. That's virtually impossible. Rather, it can be useful to consider your overall investment strategy ahead of time, so that you know you could stomach the next inevitable crash when it comes. Ideally, through proper diversification and forethought you'll have an investment approach that will enable you to ride out a crash, rather than turning you into another panicked seller. If you only act on these issues when the crash comes, it will likely be too late.
Admittedly, getting to the right mix can be tricky. The percentage of stocks you're perfectly comfortable with when the market is going gangbusters may leave you frightened and anxious when stock prices plummet. One way to arrive at a portfolio mix that jibes with your risk tolerance and financial needs is to go to a tool like Vanguard's risk tolerance-asset allocation questionnaire. The tool suggests a percentage of stocks and bonds that should make sense for you. It will also show you how various mixes of stocks and bonds have fared over the long term and in up and down markets.

Economic effects of the September 11 attacks (2001) Stock market downturn of 2002 Chinese stock bubble of 2007 United States bear market of 2007–09 Financial crisis of 2007–08 Dubai debt standstill European debt crisis 2010 Flash Crash 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami (Aftermath) August 2011 stock markets fall 2011 Bangladesh share market scam 2015–16 Chinese stock market turbulence 2015–16 stock market crash 2016 United Kingdom EU referendum (Aftermath) 2018 Cryptocurrency crash
DSP Mutual Fund sold Dewan Housing bonds this week to boost its cash holdings before an expected tightening of market liquidity in September, Kalpen Parekh, president of DSP, said in an interview. The firm sold 3 billion rupees ($41.6 million) of the bonds to express “our interest view, not a credit view,” Parekh said. “This has been done across issuers over last few days.”
The failure set off a worldwide run on US gold deposits (i.e. the dollar), and forced the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates into the slump. Some 4,000 banks and other lenders ultimately failed. Also, the uptick rule,[37] which allowed short selling only when the last tick in a stock's price was positive, was implemented after the 1929 market crash to prevent short sellers from driving the price of a stock down in a bear raid.[38]
If you could only listen to one person's advice during a stock market crash, let that person be famed investor, Warren Buffett. Not only will the Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-B) (NYSE: BRK-A) chairman and CEO's advice serve you well, but his knack for keeping a clear head -- and even getting a bit greedy (more on that later) -- when everyone else is selling, may make his the only advice you need to navigate uncertain times.
"I've been in retailing 30 years and I have never seen any category of goods get on a self-destruct pattern like this", a Service Merchandise executive told The New York Times in June 1983.[12] The price war was so severe that in September Coleco CEO Arnold Greenberg welcomed rumors of an IBM 'Peanut' home computer because "IBM is a company that knows how to make money". "I look back a year or two in the videogame field, or the home-computer field", Greenberg added, "how much better everyone was, when most people were making money, rather than very few".[15] Companies reduced production in the middle of the year because of weak demand even as prices remained low, causing shortages as sales suddenly rose during the Christmas season;[16] only the Commodore 64 was widely available, with an estimated more than 500,000 computers sold during Christmas.[17] The 99/4A was such a disaster for TI, that the company's stock immediately rose by 25% after the company discontinued it and exited the home-computer market in late 1983.[18] JC Penney announced in December 1983 that it would soon no longer sell home computers, because of the combination of low supply and low prices.[19]
A stock market anomaly, the major market indexes dropped by over 9% (including a roughly 7% decline in a roughly 15-minute span at approximately 2:45 p.m., on May 6, 2010)[68][69] before a partial rebound.[8] Temporarily, $1 trillion in market value disappeared.[70] While stock markets do crash, immediate rebounds are unprecedented. The stocks of eight major companies in the S&P 500 fell to one cent per share for a short time, including Accenture, CenterPoint Energy and Exelon; while other stocks, including Sotheby's, Apple Inc. and Hewlett-Packard, increased in value to over $100,000 in price.[7][71][72] Procter & Gamble in particular dropped nearly 37% before rebounding, within minutes, back to near its original levels. The drop in P&G was broadcast live on CNBC at the time, with commentator Jim Cramer commenting:

Each of these consoles had its own library of games produced by the console maker, and many had large libraries of games produced by third-party developers. In 1982, analysts noticed trends of saturation, mentioning that the amount of new software coming in will only allow a few big hits, that retailers had too much floor space for systems, along with price drops for home computers could result in an industry shakeup.[3]


Thanks for writing the article. It makes some sense. but how about if the amounts are very different? I am currently considering selling my home which will now sell for $1.7 mil. when I purchased 6 years ago it was just under $600k. a 20% drop would be a gain of $340k which would be nice. But the main reason I would consider selling is to re purpose the tax free gains and invest in a range of different investments. I never intended for my house to be an investment tool, but as it has given me such large gains it seems foolish not to take them. In the perhaps 5% to 10% chance the housing market does continue to soar upwards then I guess I’ll never own again! but I will still have considerable assets that will secure me for life.
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If you are concerned about how much you could lose on some of your largest positions, you can also think about using stop loss orders to mitigate potential losses. For each stock, you can set a few price levels below technical support where you will begin to reduce the size of the position. It’s best to do this long before stock prices begin to fall so that your decisions are rational and not driven by emotions. Stop losses are not generally a strategy used by long term investors. However, they can help you manage the emotional pain of a bear market.
It’s beyond Black Monday. The next stock market crash will combine the effects of Black Monday with the tech bubble of 1999-2000 and the recession that resulted from the crash of 2007-2008. The Shiller CAPE ratio, which measures a stock’s performance by comparing its price against earnings over a 10-year period, has reached the very point when Alan Greenspan pronounced his famous “irrational exuberance” speech. (Source: “The stock market’s valuation is back to the point where Greenspan warned of ‘irrational exuberance’,” CNBC, October 31, 2017.)
At the time of the Flash Crash, in May 2010, high-frequency traders were taking advantage of unintended consequences of the consolidation of the U.S. financial regulations into Regulation NMS,[3][13] designed to modernize and strengthen the United States National Market System for equity securities.[14]:641 The Reg NMS, promulgated and described by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, was intended to assure that investors received the best price executions for their orders by encouraging competition in the marketplace, created attractive new opportunities for high-frequency-traders. Activities such as spoofing, layering and front-running were banned by 2015.[citation needed] This rule was designed to give investors the best possible price when dealing in stocks, even if that price was not on the exchange that received the order.[15]:171
Hi Mike, I would say yes, see the https://gordcollins.com/real-estate/mississauga-real-estate-forecast/ post on those trends. Milton has no room to grow with everyone wanting to live there. They’ll get the free trade deal resolved and Doug Fords new plan to expand northward into farm country will stimulate the economy like crazy. Detached in Mississauga/Milton are rare finds so not surprising Milton has the 3rd lowest days on market in the GTA. Once Ford is in, the prices will rise because he probably will turn the economy on.

I am very frightened. This past June, I allowed a financial advisor to convince me that my portfolio made up of primarily stocks was risky for a retiree. I have been retired since 2005 and had held the same stocks since then. These stocks included 2 Canadian banks, BCE, TransAlta, and Emera. I was receiving dividends o $4,800 per year and all the stocks consistently raised their dividends. The financial advisor put me in2 costly mutual funds which proceeded to lose me $ 1800 within days and also swallowed up up my incoming dividends from the former portfolio. By the time I was down $6,000 I panicked and pulled out of the mutual funds. And! This was in 2017. What I have left and what I thought would carry me through my retirement is now in a money market making very little and I am terrified daily as to reinvesting it.


In 2011 high-frequency traders moved away from the stock market as there had been lower volatility and volume. The combined average daily trading volume in the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market in the first four months of 2011 fell 15% from 2010, to an average of 6.3 billion shares a day. Trading activities declined throughout 2011, with April's daily average of 5.8 billion shares marking the lowest month since May 2008. Sharp movements in stock prices, which were frequent during the period from 2008 to the first half of 2010, were in a decline in the Chicago Board Options Exchange volatility index, the VIX, which fell to its lowest level in April 2011 since July 2007.[83]

So take this time to go over your holdings and tally up how much you have in stocks and how much in bonds. If you're not sure of the asset make-up in some of your investments — which may be the case if you own funds that invest in a combination of stocks and bonds — plug the names or ticker symbols of your funds into Morningstar's Instant X-Ray tool, and you'll see how your portfolio overall is divvied up between stocks, bonds and cash.
The increase in internet trading also led to the crash of 2000. The internet served an easy access to trading for a lot of traders who lacked the required experience. Their trial and error methods of trading lead to losses in the stock trading market. Another supposed reason is that the research firms had a conflict of interest. The investment bankers had the research firms put not so honest ratings on the stocks, thus leading to an overall loss of wealth in the market.
If you really believe the market is headed for an imminent crash, there are all sorts of places you could invest your money. You could move it all into cash, you could buy gold or real estate or for that matter you could even take an aggressive approach and try to capitalize on stocks' carnage by loading up on investments designed to rise when the market falls, such as bear market funds or put options.

The critical point where bubbles end happens as investors begin to think that the rally is over. It is when this opinion travels deep into the system and becomes generalized that the system ends up in a crash. The paradox here is that a crash is often (and mistakenly) characterized as “market chaos.” In fact, it is the opposite: a crash reflects a highly ordered market, when everyone does the same thing (i.e. sell). A truly “chaotic” market is one where everyone is doing something different, interactions offset each other and price volatility remains low.
Hi Christine, I can’t offer advice. There is a lot of risk in 2020. Trudeau may botch the trade negotiations and that could could start a Toronto slide. Without the auto sector, Whitby and Oshawa could get hit hard. Good thing is Trudeau could be gone next year and the Americans might listen to a new conservative government. Harper’s already visited the back door at the white house. From here to 2020 could be rough in Canada. Good luck with your sale.

If you could only listen to one person's advice during a stock market crash, let that person be famed investor, Warren Buffett. Not only will the Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK-B) (NYSE: BRK-A) chairman and CEO's advice serve you well, but his knack for keeping a clear head -- and even getting a bit greedy (more on that later) -- when everyone else is selling, may make his the only advice you need to navigate uncertain times.
Finally, higher rates are especially problematic for so-called growth stocks, which includes tech stocks. "The lure for these stocks is growth in earnings down the road, but when interest rates are higher, the future value of those earnings streams declines," Hickey says. On Wednesday, video streamer Netflix fell 8.4 percent, Facebook tumbled 4.1 percent and Apple fell 4.6 percent.
You are obviously a banker of some sort. The bankers and the bank owners are fucking greedy bastards. PERIOD. Look at the situation. They make billions but cant provide benefits. It is the obligation of owners and investors to provide for workers. Its is supposed to work that way. But they and you KEEP it all and give the people swill. You al suck and have been compared to serial killers on a psychological level.. Stop defending the indefensible! you bought the bailout in 08 and the took bonuses for causing it. You put people and kids in th street then went sailing. So fuck you and your bastard cronies!!!!!
Buy when others sell. Historically, stocks rebound much higher than their price levels just before a bear market. This was the case in 1987, 1990, 2001, and in 2008 (just after the Great Recession began) after severe market collapses in those years. By contributing regularly to your 401k plan, your IRA plan and your stock and mutual fund investments, you're "buying at the dip," as Wall Street traders like to say. That means you're buying when prices are low, thus giving you significantly more bang for your investment buck. Remember, stocks become overpriced as bull markets mature. They become cheap in bear markets.
With a Real Wealth Strategist subscription Matt will be your guide to making the kinds of profits many investors only dream about. You’ll get access to his education and experience: Over 20 years in the natural resource industry, expertise in mining, industry and agriculture, and the chance to travel with him as he visits mines, oil projects and company headquarters, in search of the perfect investment idea. Real Wealth Strategist’s portfolio focuses on all natural resources. Essentially, if there’s a way to maximize profits, he’s going to find it and recommend it.
This crisis is rooted in the failure to learn the lessons of 2008 and of every other recession since the Fed’s creation: A secretive central bank should not be allowed to manipulate interest rates and distort economic signals regarding market conditions. Such action leads to malinvestment and an explosion of individual, business, and government debt. This may cause a temporary boom, but the boom soon will be followed by a bust. The only way this cycle can be broken without a major crisis is for Congress both to restore people’s right to use the currency of their choice and to audit and then end the Fed.
That was six years ago. Funnily enough, the author of this blog, David Haggith, recently posted an article titled I Bet My Blog on a 2018 Economic Collapse. Basically, he is going to throw sh*t at the wall until something finally sticks – then he’ll pontificate to everyone about how his prediction was correct. It is worth noting that he also predicted that 2016 would be the year of the economic apocalypse and that he was “fairly sure” that stocks would slump in January, 2017.
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