There was a chart floating around in early 2014 that had a 97.5% correlation between the stock market of 1928-29 and the stock market of 2013-14. That chart boldly predicted a massive stock market crash in 2014. Instead, from when the market was supposed to crash into the end of the year, stocks rose nearly 10%, and were in the middle of the longest bull market in history.
If you make 6% after taxes and fees on your investments, then you’re ahead by 3.5%, or $20k/year after the transaction fees are taken off. In Vancouver, like the couple from the G&M article, you’re ahead by more not only in percentage terms due to a higher price-to-rent, but also because the amounts are higher ($1M houses rather than $650k), so you’re even further ahead in dollar terms ($45k per year).
Japanese asset price bubble 1991 Lasting approximately twenty years, through at least the end of 2011, share and property price bubble bursts and turns into a long deflationary recession. Some of the key economic events during the collapse of the Japanese asset price bubble include the 1997 Asian financial crisis and the Dot-com bubble. In addition, more recent economic events, such as the late-2000s financial crisis and August 2011 stock markets fall have prolonged this period.
The second reason is that it is impossible to predict the beginning of a bull market. By sitting through the crash, you are basically ensuring that your investments are safe and rolling. History teaches us that stocks rally back to their old levels, given some time. Also, stock crashes in the last 100 years have lasted an average of just over ten months. So if waiting is an option, it would be the best one.
A market collapse can wipe out what economists call "paper wealth." Paper wealth is money tied up in investments like the stock market or the real estate market that could be sold for a gain, but hasn't yet. In contrast, "real wealth" refers to actual, physical assets, like the money in your bank account, or a vehicle you own that is fully paid off and can be sold for a definite financial gain.
I am one of the victims of this mess. Bought new home Jan. 2006. By 2010 my Mortgage was sold and re-sold 4 times without anyone telling me or asking me for my permission. Just got a notice that my monthly auto payment was denied. Checking with the bank there was a new Financial Facility owning my home and wanting that payment. Also, from the first bank with the Mortgage, to the 4th Bank with the Mortgage, each of them, (1 was Natl. City Bank) also sold and went under moving my Accounts with my Money each time. Again without my approval or knowledge. I am now 66 trying to get a Harp Loan with lower interest rate while on Social Security and I’m told I can’t because my loan shows it is only 5 years old and it is really 10 years old. I’m screwed and will have to sell now at this time of life because I was a pawn on the board of this crappy game they all played and have to pay the price. NOT FAIR AT ALL!!!
The heads of the SEC and CFTC often point out that they are running an IT museum. They have photographic evidence to prove it—the highest-tech background that The New York Times (on September 21, 2010) could find for a photo of Gregg Berman, the SEC’s point man on the Flash, was a corner with five PCs, a Bloomberg, a printer, a fax, and three TVs on the wall with several large clocks.

Using a simple options calculator (like that available at options-price.com) we can calculate how our put options purchased in the example above would perform after a 20% decline in the span of just a month. In this hypothetical example, SPY drops to 175 and implied volatility rises to 55 (for this example I took the VIX level of 45 in October 2002, as suggested by Spitznagel, and added 10 points for 10% out-of-the-money put options). Our puts have gone from $9 each in value to $328.10. We own 55 of them so they are now worth just over $18,000 in total.


On October 19th 1987, $500 billion in market capitalization was evaporated from the Dow Jones stock index. Markets in nearly every country around the world plunged in a similar fashion. When individual investors heard that a massive stock market crash was occurring, they rushed to call their brokers to sell their stocks. This was unsuccessful because each broker had many clients. Many people lost millions of dollars instantly. There are stories of some unstable individuals who had lost large amounts of money who went to their broker’s office with a gun and started shooting. A few brokers were killed despite the fact that they had no control over the market action. The majority of investors who were selling did not even know why they were selling except for the fact that “everyone else was selling.” This emotionally-charged behavior is one of the main reasons that the stock market crashed so dramatically. After the October 19th plunge, many futures and stock exchanges were shut down for a day.

Many factors likely contributed to the collapse of the stock market. Among the more prominent causes were the period of rampant speculation (those who had bought stocks on margin not only lost the value of their investment, they also owed money to the entities that had granted the loans for the stock purchases), tightening of credit by the Federal Reserve (in August 1929 the discount rate was raised from 5 percent to 6 percent), the proliferation of holding companies and investment trusts (which tended to create debt), a multitude of large bank loans that could not be liquidated, and an economic recession that had begun earlier in the summer.
TREB’s own survey found that foreign buyers actually had little effect on the market, and it was the chilling effect of the fair housing act that destroyed what was a healthy Toronto real estate market. Although Doug Ford originally promised to free up land, lower prices, and cut red tape, he quickly recanted. He has announced a new buck a beer program.
Marc, I hope you and your kids can stay in So Cal, but can you see how the money and people are being vilified for wanting to be part of California’s successful economy and lifestyle. The real villains are those who are preventing development. And that new development really drives the economy, thus giving California a chance to compete in the global age. Other cities in Canada and the UK have the same problem and in each case it’s politicians squeezing supply. And the actions they’re taking does point to a recession eventually. If California’s polticians remove constraints, you’ll have lower prices in San Diego, LA and the SF Bay Area. The market alway solves itself.
The failure set off a worldwide run on US gold deposits (i.e. the dollar), and forced the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates into the slump. Some 4,000 banks and other lenders ultimately failed. Also, the uptick rule,[37] which allowed short selling only when the last tick in a stock's price was positive, was implemented after the 1929 market crash to prevent short sellers from driving the price of a stock down in a bear raid.[38]

At first, while the regulatory agencies and the United States Congress announced investigations into the crash,[16] no specific reason for the six hundred point plunge was identified. Investigators focused on a number of possible causes, including a confluence of computer-automated trades, or possibly an error by human traders. By the first weekend, regulators had discounted the possibility of trader error and focused on automated trades conducted on exchanges other than the NYSE. However, CME Group, a large futures exchange, stated that, insofar as stock index futures traded on CME Group were concerned, its investigation found no evidence for this or that high-frequency trading played a role, and in fact concluded that automated trading had contributed to market stability during the period of the crash.[17] Others speculate that an intermarket sweep order may have played a role in triggering the crash.[18]

So, I should go ahead and take that last $15 I have in the bank out?? (better yet ill use it to fill up a gas can) Looks like this isn’t going to end well. The problem is the talking bimbos on the idiot box keep telling the lotus eaters of this world that everything is fine. (And they believe them!!) Have you tried to wake some of these people up to the fact that this will not end well?? My friends all thought I was crazy when I decided to move to the country to an off grid cabin in the woods two years ago, still not 100% ready but at least I don’t have to walk among them. God bless and prep on!


I’m less concerned than our friends at the Fed. Businesses are rebelling in mass against Trump’s punitive tariffs on steel, aluminum, and lumber. Trump is still blind to his own economic idiocy as I write. Given the torrent of negative press on tariffs in recent weeks, I suspect that a member or two of his retinue will force him to see the light. They’ll force him sooner than later.
×