At least you are realistic about a mild softening of prices in the major capitals and a long overdue rise in Brisbane,unlike the doom and gloom people interviewed on 60 Minutes recently.Fear generating predictions about price falls goes on every few years and some so-called news and current events programs are irresponsible in making these out to be accurate forecasts from experts.
The affordability index continues to be stacked against potential home buyers. As housing and rental prices steadily increase, wages continue to stay relatively stagnant. Historically, the average income-to-housing cost ratio in the U.S. has hovered near 30 percent, but in some metro areas, that number is currently closer to 40 and even 50 percent! This strips away the opportunity to save money as a significant portion of a person’s monthly income is going to keeping a roof over their head.
I have been an agent and real estate investor since 2001. I have seen the good times in the early 2000’s, worked through the housing crash, and the good times again. A lot of people think we are due for anther housing market crash because housing prices have increased in many areas of the country. Besides prices, there are many things that drive the housing market. In fact, prices cannot be used as an indicator of what the market will do because they are just a result of many other factors. Supply and demand are what push prices up or down. Supply is affected by foreclosures, homeowners’ willingness to move, new construction, and many other factors. Demand is driven by the economy, lending guidelines, potential homeowners confidence, wages, and much more. I believe the supply and demand affecting today’s’ housing market is much different than what drove the last housing boom. While prices could level out or decrease in some areas, I do not think we are in for a nationwide crash.
Another criticism of certain conventional risk models, is that they regard market crashes as extremely unlikely. Market models suggested 2008 was an incredibly rare event. However, the 1930s crash was fairly similar. Having extremely improbable events just eighty years apart makes very little sense. Of course, we could be massively unlucky, but it is of course far more likely that the model is wrong. And by wrong, we should be clear that we mean inappropriate for the high stress environments of a crash. Most of the time these models hold up just fine, but at the extremes they don't.
If you break up the components of the correction, the entire fall was concentrated in financials and other sectors where there are valuation concerns. Even within the large cap space, the correction was sharpest in stocks like Kotak Bank, Adani Ports, Bajaj Finserv, Bajaj Finance etc where there already are valuation concerns. The basket selling was largely restricted to stocks like Yes Bank, Indiabulls and DHFL, which were in the news as well as stocks where valuation concerns have been around for quite some time.
In the 694 days between 11 January 1973 and 6 December 1974, the New York Stock Exchange's Dow Jones Industrial Average benchmark suffered the seventh-worst bear market in its history, losing over 45% of its value.[2] 1972 had been a good year for the DJIA, with gains of 15% in the twelve months. 1973 had been expected to be even better, with Time magazine reporting just 3 days before the crash began that it was 'shaping up as a gilt-edged year'.[3] In the two years from 1972 to 1974, the American economy slowed from 7.2% real GDP growth to −2.1% contraction, while inflation (by CPI) jumped from 3.4% in 1972 to 12.3% in 1974.[1]
Note that the source of increasing "order flow toxicity" on May 6, 2010, is not determined in Easley, Lopez de Prado, and O'Hara's 2011 publication.[50] Whether a dominant source of toxic order flow on May 6, 2010, was from firms representing public investors or whether a dominant source was intermediary or other proprietary traders could have a significant effect on regulatory proposals put forward to prevent another Flash Crash. According to Bloomberg, the VPIN metric is the subject of a pending patent application filed by the paper's three authors, Maureen O'Hara and David Easley of Cornell University, and Marcos Lopez de Prado, of Tudor Investment Corporation.[58]
— The Big Picture is Being Obscured By Short-Term Fears. "Animal Spirits" are ruling the stock market. Millions of investors are afraid that the torrent of cash created by low interest rates, hefty piles of corporate reserves and even more giveaways in the new U.S. tax code won't be enough to juice up a world economy (outside of the developing world) that may be slowing down.
Now started the preparations for reforms to revive the market and pull it out from the huge crisis. The first and foremost reform that was suggested was the uniformity of the margin requirements. This was done so that the volatility of the stocks, stock options and index features could be reduced. Also, the installation of new computer systems was suggested so that the market could be pulled out from these difficult times as soon as possible. These computer systems that were newly installed in the stock exchanges needed just a single keystroke to enter the trade. Earlier this work would be tiresome and needed almost 25 keystrokes. These new computer systems rejected the trade if a wrong input was made. Those ways these computers helped increase the efficiency of data management. They also helped to minimize errors and maximize productivity. Overall these new computer systems were helping to manage the data with much ease decreasing chances of mistakes to a great extent.
The turbulence in India follows bursts of market volatility across Asian and developing countries this year. While a record-breaking surge in U.S. stocks has kept equity markets largely buoyant, some investors are growing skittish as global interest rates rise. The Hong Kong dollar posted its biggest swing since 2003 on Friday, while markets from Turkey to Argentina have endured big spikes in volatility in recent months.
This year’s rate rises however are a bit alarming as this graphic shows — 70% in the last year. When you consider that such rises always accompany recessions, it’s no surprise to see a stock market correction or pullback and even a housing market slide. To investors, this scenario doesn’t look good. It can affect stock prices and discourage investment in new US businesses.
In 1907 and in 1908, the NYSE fell by nearly 50% due to a variety of factors, led by the manipulation of copper stocks by the Knickerbocker company.[21] Shares of United Copper rose gradually up to October, and thereafter crashed, leading to panic.[22][23] A number of investment trusts and banks that had invested their money in the stock market fell and started to close down. Further bank runs were prevented due to the intervention of J.P.Morgan.[24] The panic continued to 1908 finally and led to the formation of the Federal reserve in 1913.[25]

Futures and options markets are hedging and risk transfer markets. The report references a series of bona fide hedging transactions, totaling 75,000 contracts, entered into by an institutional asset manager to hedge a portion of the risk in its $75 billion investment portfolio in response to global economic events and the fundamentally deteriorating market conditions that day. The 75,000 contracts represented 1.3% of the total E-Mini S&P 500 volume of 5.7 million contracts on May 6 and less than 9% of the volume during the time period in which the orders were executed. The prevailing market sentiment was evident well before these orders were placed, and the orders, as well as the manner in which they were entered, were both legitimate and consistent with market practices. These hedging orders were entered in relatively small quantities and in a manner designed to dynamically adapt to market liquidity by participating in a target percentage of 9% of the volume executed in the market. As a result of the significant volumes traded in the market, the hedge was completed in approximately twenty minutes, with more than half of the participant's volume executed as the market rallied—not as the market declined. Additionally, the aggregate size of this participant's orders was not known to other market participants.

You haven’t seen the effects of *any* of Trumps decisions yet. And Obama’s decisions had virtually zero impact on creating the Great Recession. There wasn’t time. Unless you believe in teleportation, magic, and instantaneous changes to the marketplace and if that’s the case, I’m a nigerian prince building a bridge and boy have I got a business proposition for you…
The last week of January 2018 and the first week of February 2018, the Dow Jones dropped several hundred points. It looks to close out February 2 down hundreds of points, with other indexes (S&P 500, NASDAQ) to follow. While this may seem like a crisis, it is more than likely to reflect short-term investors taking their profits (in the long run up to this point) and shuffling them to other types of investments to prepare for improved bond yields.

The Dow Jones is flying, but the risks of a crash are many and ready to materialize. Donald Trump was elected almost a year ago, at the time of writing. The markets were supposed to have crashed. They did for a few hours. Despite the many protests, marches, and witch hunts that the 2016 presidential election has caused, the Dow has gained about 30% since November 8, 2016.
As a result, while some stores sold new games and machines, most retailers stopped selling video game consoles or reduced their stock significantly, reserving floor or shelf space for other products. This was the most formidable barrier that confronted Nintendo, as it tried to market its Famicom system in the United States. Retailer opposition to video games was directly responsible for causing Nintendo to brand its product an "Entertainment System" rather than a "console", using terms such as "control deck" and "Game Pak", as well as producing a toy robot called R.O.B. to convince toy retailers to allow it in their stores. Furthermore, the design for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) used a front-loading cartridge slot to mimic how video cassette recorders, popular at that time, were loaded, further pulling the NES away from previous console designs.[35][36][37]
Housing crash warnings have been sounding for many years both here and in China, which means the pressure for a big crash has been building.  China is in trouble and so is Canada. With pressure, the human element, the human reaction, built on expectations built up by obsessively negative anti-Trump propaganda, could be sufficient to launch a panic-induced collapse.  A panic meter might be the most significant crash signal.
Hi Tamara, a vacation rental property owner in San Diego County I knew did well during the recession. Prices are much higher now and you’ll need to be a very good rental property manager. Take a look at the San Diego Housing market report if you didn’t read it. San Diego’s fantastic and the shortage there will never ease. My opinion is that you need to be a good marketer to keep it rented. If you build up a good database of returning renters, you should be okay. With VRBO and Airbnb, you’ll have extra reach too. With Trump bringing jobs and investment money back home, I can’t see a recession, just volatility and maybe some trade wars!

Currently, the U.S. stock market is in the midst of one of the longest bull markets in its history. Since bottoming out in March 2009, the broad-based S&P 500 (INDEX: ^GSPC), led by a strong rally in technology stocks and other growth industries, has surged by more than 325%! Mind you, the stock market has historically returned 7% a year, inclusive of dividend reinvestment and adjusted for inflation. So, to say that things are going well right now would be an understatement.

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Not only has subprime lending seen a major decline, but mortgages have also become much harder to attain due to stringent lending standards. According to CoreLogic’s Housing Credit Index, loans originated in 2016 were among the highest quality originated in the last 15 years. This is greatly due to the type of borrowers able to qualify for loans. The current average credit score for borrowers being granted mortgages is 739. In October 2009, the average FICO score was 686, according to Fair Isaac. The lowest one percent of mortgages issued have credit scores averaging 622-624. Compared to the average range in 2001 of 490-510, the standard to get financing has risen substantially, and as a result, the likelihood of default has dropped. Lenders have done this to ensure the economy doesn’t again become propped on bad loans like it was leading up to the Great Recession.

A truly stunning result of these investigations is that the real-life frequency and size of market returns bear a notable resemblance to what is obtained by running very simple computer models. This also goes for earthquakes, solar flares, forest fires, and river floods: most of the simulations yield similar results to real life where events are frequent but small, but occasionally some gigantic one appears from nowhere.
The heads of the SEC and CFTC often point out that they are running an IT museum. They have photographic evidence to prove it—the highest-tech background that The New York Times (on September 21, 2010) could find for a photo of Gregg Berman, the SEC’s point man on the Flash, was a corner with five PCs, a Bloomberg, a printer, a fax, and three TVs on the wall with several large clocks.
The North American video game crash had two long-lasting results. The first result was that dominance in the home console market shifted from the United States to Japan. By 1986, three years after its introduction, 6.5 million Japanese homes—19% of the population—owned a Family Computer, and Nintendo began exporting it to the U.S.;[44] by 1987 the Nintendo Entertainment System was very popular in North America.[48] When the U.S. video game market recovered in the late 1980s the NES was by far the dominant console, leaving only a fraction of the market to a resurgent Atari. By 1989, home video game sales in the United States had reached $5 billion, surpassing the 1982 peak of $3 billion during the previous generation. A large majority of the market was controlled by Nintendo; it sold more than 35 million units in the United States, exceeding the sales of other consoles and personal computers by a considerable margin.[49] Other Japanese companies also rivaled Nintendo's success in the United States, with Sega's Mega Drive/Genesis in 1989 and NEC's PC Engine/TurboGrafx 16 released the same year.
But it's during those times when you need to guard against overriding the rational process you went through to build your portfolio. If you want to re-evaluate the portfolio mix you arrived at earlier just to confirm that it's right for you and even possibly make a small tweak or two, fine. But you don't want to let fear and emotions dictate your investing strategy and lead you to make impulsive decisions you may rue later.

You might be wondering if we’ve endured one too many ghost apparitions. To suggest that no less than Warren Buffett, whose net worth is north of $80.0 billion, expects the market to reverse its bullish course seems not just scary, it seems silly. But Warren Buffett’s predictions for 2018 call for at least a market correction—if not an outright crash.


6750 ft up on top of a mountain lends some perspective that’s for sure, The quiet is great for the sole. We still have to work during the week. On the weekends we work for ourselves, gathering firewood learning how to grow food etc. Freedom at least for me is eliminating the need for outside inputs. We have just enough solar power to be comfortable running our house. Woodstove for heat, well for our water. Growing some vegetables for food. Every year is easier than the year before.
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Market crashes present great shopping opportunities for those who are ready for them. Consulting your trusty watch list, you'll be reminded of all the stocks you're interested in buying, and you can see how far they've fallen, too. You're likely to run across some other stocks to consider, also, when reading, watching, or listening to financial media.
But what about the risk of a property price crash as suggested by the recent Sixty Minutes report? Several things are worth noting in relation to this: predictions of a 30-50% property price crash have been wheeled out regularly in Australian media over the last decade including on Sixty Minutes; the anecdotes of mortgage stress and defaults don’t line up well with actual data showing low levels of arrears; borrowers have already been moving from interest only to principle and interest loans over the last few years, without a lot of stress; and the 40-45% price fall call on the program was “if everything turns against us”. Our view remains that in the absence of much higher interest rates, much higher unemployment, or a multi-year supply surge (none of which are expected) a property crash is unlikely. But the risks are now greater than when property crash calls started to be made a decade or so ago and so deeper price falls than the 15% top to bottom fall we expect for Sydney and Melbourne are a high risk. This is particularly so given the risk that post the Royal Commission bank lending standards become excessively tight, negative gearing is restricted and the capital gains tax discount is halved after a change in government in Canberra. There is also a big risk that FOMO (fear of missing out) becomes FONGO (fear of not getting out) for some.
Of course, that's an average and the market's return is seldom steady and predictable. Yet, it's important to remember that these attractive returns include many periods when the markets have lost a quarter or half their value, or worse. As a result, even if you know a crash is coming at some point, which it very likely is at some point in the coming years, then it's not a reason to avoid stocks. Provided you can stick with it you'll likely see decent returns from diversified global stocks even including the catastrophic crashes that scare you.
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