Perhaps the best way to hedge your portfolio against a crash, is to make sure you always have a healthy portion of it allocated to cash. The amount you allocate to cash really depends on how much volatility you are happy to tolerate. More cash means you stand to lose less, but you will probably lose out on returns in the long run. A lower cash balance will probably lead to higher overall returns, but will also mean higher volatility.
This also means that it is a mistake to think of investors as a bunch of clueless, greed-driven lemmings falling off a cliff during a market crash. For example, during the real estate boom of the mid-2000s people kept buying homes despite an abundance of media articles pointing out that the property market was swept in a mania. There was no question, even then, that the market was overheated. So why did people continue to buy homes?
The Fed didn't realize a collapse was brewing until March 2007. It realized that hedge fund housing losses could threaten the economy. Throughout the summer, banks became unwilling to lend to each other. They were afraid that they would receive bad MBS in return. Bankers didn't know how much bad debt they had on their books. No one wanted to admit it. If they did, then their credit rating would be lowered. Then, their stock price would fall, and they would be unable to raise more funds to stay in business.
Not only has subprime lending seen a major decline, but mortgages have also become much harder to attain due to stringent lending standards. According to CoreLogic’s Housing Credit Index, loans originated in 2016 were among the highest quality originated in the last 15 years. This is greatly due to the type of borrowers able to qualify for loans. The current average credit score for borrowers being granted mortgages is 739. In October 2009, the average FICO score was 686, according to Fair Isaac. The lowest one percent of mortgages issued have credit scores averaging 622-624. Compared to the average range in 2001 of 490-510, the standard to get financing has risen substantially, and as a result, the likelihood of default has dropped. Lenders have done this to ensure the economy doesn’t again become propped on bad loans like it was leading up to the Great Recession.
Predicting housing prices is famously difficult. And forecasting housing meltdowns like the one that nearly brought down the global financial system in 2008 may be downright impossible. For now, though, the way experts cautiously paint the future for next year is closer to the picture of a landing plane than that of a rocket ship plummeting earthward.
Hi Gord. Thanks for this informative piece. Its best info I’ve found on the net. I plan to invest in a $250K – $300K property in Ontario without living in it as I am in UAE. Which town of Ontario do you suggest I should invest in to keep my rental income coming, along with chance of property appreciation. Toronto is surely very expensive now so we are think about these towns: Oshawa, Guelp, berries or Milton…what would you do if you had this much of savings and wanted to invest in Ontario Market for 2 years
No mention of the paper trading driving the price down while banks and foreign governments are buying big time on this manipulated market. If these entities are buying these metals they see the value, not to mention that every major nation has a currency based on huge deficits. So where is the value? Precious metals that have retained value for thousands or years or paper currency that is backed by nothing more that a politicians promise?
Investors bore the emotional scars from the crash for the next four years. On June 1, 2012, they panicked over a poor May jobs report and the eurozone debt crisis. The Dow dropped 275 points. The 10-year benchmark Treasury yield dropped to 1.443 during intraday trading. This was the lowest rate in more than 200 years. It signaled that the confidence that evaporated during 2008 had not quite returned to Wall Street. 
Housing supply is also an important dynamic to consider when looking at a then-and-now analysis of the housing market. Since mortgages were being given out with little regard to the borrower’s ability to pay back the loan, new home building skyrocketed to meet the new demand. In 2005, new home sales hit a 52 year high with 1.28 million new homes being built. Ten years later, only 500,000 new homes were constructed, dropping 61 percent from the peak ten years prior. An overall lack of inventory continues to be a driver in price appreciation.
Another thing you can do if you're anticipating a market crash is to include a bunch of defensive stocks in your portfolio, as they tend to get less punished during a market downturn. Defensive stocks belong to companies whose fortunes aren't very tied to the economy's movements. For example, people might put off buying refrigerators or cars during a recession, but they'll still buy groceries, socks, soaps, gas, medicine, electricity and diapers. Thus, food, tobacco, energy, and pharmaceuticals are some defensive industries, seen as more stable than their "cyclical" counterparts, such as the homebuilding, steel, automobile, and airline industries. You don't have to avoid cyclical industries in your investing, but know that they can move sharply in relationship to the economy.
I’m a first time buyer and i’m exploring to purchase a condo in downtown Toronto. A one decent 550sqft condo sells for about 450k (which i find absurd). Would you advise waiting till mid 2018, with the new stress test rules, in hopes that the prices will decrease? I can’t justify paying so much, but at the same time the prices seem to be going up every month.

This year’s rate rises however are a bit alarming as this graphic shows — 70% in the last year. When you consider that such rises always accompany recessions, it’s no surprise to see a stock market correction or pullback and even a housing market slide. To investors, this scenario doesn’t look good. It can affect stock prices and discourage investment in new US businesses.


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The 1987 crash was so big that the stock market ended up losing almost $1/2 trillion. Now, what could be the probable reason for such an unnatural crash in the stock market? Market analysts over the years have deduced the reasons which could have resulted in this market crash. The first and foremost reason they found out was that the market lacked liquidity. The market failed to manage the sudden and extremely high volume of sell orders. It seemed that almost all the investors needed to sell their stocks at that particular time. This became difficult for the market to handle and resulted in the crash.
The critical point where bubbles end happens as investors begin to think that the rally is over. It is when this opinion travels deep into the system and becomes generalized that the system ends up in a crash. The paradox here is that a crash is often (and mistakenly) characterized as “market chaos.” In fact, it is the opposite: a crash reflects a highly ordered market, when everyone does the same thing (i.e. sell). A truly “chaotic” market is one where everyone is doing something different, interactions offset each other and price volatility remains low.
The bottom line for macro-investors is that rising rates may slow an already-sluggish economy, which, in turn may depress corporate earnings. Normally that would be a paramount concern, but with corporations swimming in record amounts of cash - with more on the way from the business-friendly GOP tax law - the market's extreme reaction may be overstated.
The housing market peaked somewhere in 2006. We were beginning to see some of the early signs of trouble when some types of subprime loans started to go into default. There wasn’t worry at that time since never in history have prices for housing market gone down nationally. Once the credit markets froze in summer 2007, things began to deteriorate rapidly. Subprime credit stopped completely and interest rates for credit for other types of borrowing including corporate loans as well as consumer loans rose dramatically.
But if U.S. GDP growth were to falter -- let’s say dip to 1% or lower on an annual basis -- then it would be really difficult to support existing valuations for companies in the technology and biotech arenas. And since tech and biotech have played such a critical role over the past nine-plus years in pushing stocks higher, they could easily be responsible for dragging the stock market into a correction.
Conversely, if production issues strike a major producer (imagine, for example, a civil war in Libya), then skyrocketing oil prices could also have a detrimental impact. Rising crude prices could lead to significantly higher inflation levels and sap consumers of discretionary income at the pump or in their homes via fuel oil. We saw something similar to this in 2008, when West Texas Intermediate made a run at $150 per barrel following escalating tensions between Iran and the United States.
In Australia, ABS data confirmed that home prices fell again in the June quarter, skilled vacancies rose slightly and population growth remained strong in the March quarter. In terms of house prices, our assessment remains that the combination of tighter bank lending standards, rising supply, poor affordability and falling capital growth expectations point to more falls ahead, with Melbourne and Sydney likely to see top to bottom home price falls of around 15% out to 2020.

It is not a big surprise, however, that many investors today remain interested in the forecasts of financial analysts regardless of their success. Humans in the past consulted oracles, crystal balls and tea leaves. It’s in our nature: As the proverb goes, “tell me a fact, and I'll learn; tell me a truth, and I’ll believe; but tell me a story and it will live in my heart forever.” We are attracted to story-telling, and when it comes to investing we seem to be searching for the most compelling narratives about the unknowable future, regardless of how accurate they turn out to be.

Stock markets witnessed a sudden sell-off in the afternoon dealings on Friday with Sensex crashing 1,128 points and Nifty falling well below 11,000-mark while DHFL nosedived 60% following the rout in NBFCs and housing finance companies. DHFL share price saw the biggest intraday plunge in its stock market trading history on Friday. Most of the housing finance companies bottomed to their respective multi-year lows in the trades. Shares of Yes Bank, Maruti Suzuki, HDFC, Infosys and Sun Pharma were the biggest negative point contributors to the headline indices.
What on earth could be responsible for such optimism? After all, the oft-repeated adage that Trump’s tax cuts have been feeding the bulls on Wall Street has run its course. The tax cuts have not been approved and with the divide in Congress—a divide also within Republicans themselves—there’s little chance of the major reductions occurring. Moreover, the U.S. debt now exceeds $20.0 trillion.

I am very frightened. This past June, I allowed a financial advisor to convince me that my portfolio made up of primarily stocks was risky for a retiree. I have been retired since 2005 and had held the same stocks since then. These stocks included 2 Canadian banks, BCE, TransAlta, and Emera. I was receiving dividends o $4,800 per year and all the stocks consistently raised their dividends. The financial advisor put me in2 costly mutual funds which proceeded to lose me $ 1800 within days and also swallowed up up my incoming dividends from the former portfolio. By the time I was down $6,000 I panicked and pulled out of the mutual funds. And! This was in 2017. What I have left and what I thought would carry me through my retirement is now in a money market making very little and I am terrified daily as to reinvesting it.
To be able to make good decisions amid a stock market crash, investors will need to be able to remain calm. As Buffett has said, "Investing is not a game where the guy with the 160 IQ beats the guy with the 130 IQ. Once you have ordinary intelligence, what you need is the temperament to control the urges that get other people into trouble in investing."
Finally, higher rates are especially problematic for so-called growth stocks, which includes tech stocks. "The lure for these stocks is growth in earnings down the road, but when interest rates are higher, the future value of those earnings streams declines," Hickey says. On Wednesday, video streamer Netflix fell 8.4 percent, Facebook tumbled 4.1 percent and Apple fell 4.6 percent.
The next day, "Black Tuesday", October 29, 1929, about 16 million shares traded as the panic selling reached its peak. Some stocks actually had no buyers at any price that day ("air pockets"[citation needed]). The Dow lost an additional 30 points, or 12 percent.[11][12][13][14] The volume of stocks traded on October 29, 1929, was a record that was not broken for nearly 40 years.[12]
After nearly a decade of historically low interest rates and slow economic growth, the U.S. economy is picking up speed, bolstered by President Donald Trump's policies, such as tax cuts and less regulation of businesses. The economy grew 4.2 percent in the second quarter, its fastest pace in four years. And the job market is robust, with the September unemployment rate of 3.7 percent the lowest in nearly 50 years.
While every care has been taken in the preparation of this article, AMP Capital Investors Limited (ABN 59 001 777 591, AFSL 232497) and AMP Capital Funds Management Limited (ABN 15 159 557 721, AFSL 426455) makes no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or completeness of any statement in it including, without limitation, any forecasts. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance. This article has been prepared for the purpose of providing general information, without taking account of any particular investor’s objectives, financial situation or needs. An investor should, before making any investment decisions, consider the appropriateness of the information in this article, and seek professional advice, having regard to the investor’s objectives, financial situation and needs. This article is solely for the use of the party to whom it is provided.
"Panic is already starting to set in, which is kind of incredible when you actually think about it," said Michael Yoshikami, CEO of Destination Wealth Management. "The S&P is trading where it was in sometime in December. So it's not like we're retracing an entire 12 months of returns here. I think investors are just understandably nervous. It probably is programmed trading kicking in at this point."
I live in a housing bubble market with everyone attempting to buy at sky high prices. I bought 4.5 years ago, and am looking at selling for over a 100% gain in that amount of time. Yes attempting to sit on the sidelines waiting for the market to change may not seem the best, but rather than being intent on jumping back into the poker game because you like the action, take your earnings off the table. Markets can remain irrational for exuberant amounts of time, but you have to weigh it out. At the moment a 30% retrace would mean I lose $140,000 worth of equity currently available. I’ll rather that liquidity in the bank any day over paying the mortgage of an asset still owned by a lender, which to me is a liability.
In other words, bear markets are part of investing. You can’t avoid them – but you can make sure a bear market doesn’t wipe you out. Rule number one is to diversify, and periodically rebalance your portfolio. When a correction, stock market crash or bear market comes along, the stocks that fall the most are those that are trading at the highest valuations, those with the most debt, and those with the lowest margins.
The turbulence of the election, rising interest rates against overheated housing markets does give some plausibility to a US housing crash in 2018 or 2019. Proponents of an upcoming crash point to too many Americans living lavish lifestyles, still buying expensive foreign luxury cars on a $40,000 salary, while sitting on over-leveraged monster mortgages that could be subject to quickly rising mortgage rates.
My wife an I are looking to buy our first home and to know surprise, yes we are millennials. We live in Omaha, NE. According to CNBC it is one of the top 5 most difficult cities for millennials to buy their first home thanks to very low supply and high prices. Should we opt to continue to rent a 1 bedroom apt for $800 per month while waiting out this craziness. Or should we buy a home now to get locked in a historically low interest rate? We are torn, because we want to get into a home, but are patient and disciplined enough to wait if that’s the best financial decision. Do you see this overvalued market correcting anytime soon? Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated.
The failure set off a worldwide run on US gold deposits (i.e. the dollar), and forced the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates into the slump. Some 4,000 banks and other lenders ultimately failed. Also, the uptick rule,[37] which allowed short selling only when the last tick in a stock's price was positive, was implemented after the 1929 market crash to prevent short sellers from driving the price of a stock down in a bear raid.[38]
Consequently, we believe, that irrespective of technology, markets can become fragile when imbalances arise as a result of large traders seeking to buy or sell quantities larger than intermediaries are willing to temporarily hold, and simultaneously long-term suppliers of liquidity are not forthcoming even if significant price concessions are offered.

For example, the United States has a set of thresholds in place to guard against crashes. If the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) falls 2,400 points (threshold 2) before 1:00 p.m., the market will be frozen for an hour. If it falls below 3,600 points (threshold 3), the market closes for the day. Other countries have similar measures in place. The problem with this method today is that if one stock exchange closes, shares can often still be bought or sold in other exchanges, which can cause the preventative measures to backfire.

You are obviously a banker of some sort. The bankers and the bank owners are fucking greedy bastards. PERIOD. Look at the situation. They make billions but cant provide benefits. It is the obligation of owners and investors to provide for workers. Its is supposed to work that way. But they and you KEEP it all and give the people swill. You al suck and have been compared to serial killers on a psychological level.. Stop defending the indefensible! you bought the bailout in 08 and the took bonuses for causing it. You put people and kids in th street then went sailing. So fuck you and your bastard cronies!!!!!
Hi Lavanya. Some believe the sky over Toronto will fall in 2018, but with rentals disappearing, it’s safe to say rental income property owners will get their price. Prices won’t go down, and may actually boom if the economy takes off in 2018. Buying a rental income property, living in the upper floor and getting tenants to help with the mortgage is just plain smart. That helps with the housing crisis as well! Good luck with your rental property.
Though, again, that may be generally true, at times of severe market moves, surprisingly, often there is very little new news to justify the price change. Research on what moves stock prices, has found that prices can often move a lot without news. Also, in his book Irrational Exuberance, Robert Shiller finds that one of the biggest stock market moves of all time, 1987's Black Monday decline wasn't driven by any obvious economic event. Therefore, it's not clear that market crashes are the result of some unanticipated bad news that shocks investors.
Technical glitches: An analysis of trading on the exchanges during the moments immediately prior to the flash crash reveals technical glitches in the reporting of prices on the NYSE and various alternative trading systems (ATSs) that might have contributed to the drying up of liquidity. According to this theory, technical problems at the NYSE led to delays as long as five minutes in NYSE quotes being reported on the Consolidated Quotation System (CQS) with time stamps indicating that the quotes were current. However, some market participants (those with access to NYSE's own quote reporting system, OpenBook) could see both correct current NYSE quotes, as well as the delayed but apparently current CQS quotes. At the same time, there were errors in the prices of some stocks (Apple Inc., Sothebys, and some ETFs). Confused and uncertain about prices, many market participants attempted to drop out of the market by posting stub quotes (very low bids and very high offers) and, at the same time, many high-frequency trading algorithms attempted to exit the market with market orders (which were executed at the stub quotes) leading to a domino effect that resulted in the flash crash plunge.[37][38]
Benchmark equity indices crashed on Friday after opening on a positive note. At 1:07 pm, the S&P BSE Sensex tanked 672.38 points or 1.81 per cent to trade at 36,448.84. The broader Nifty50 was trading at 11,042.55,  down 191.80 points or 1.71 per cent. Yes Bank was the top loser in the Sensex pack today by tumbling as much as 34.03 per cent in early trade today after the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) asked its managing director and CEO Rana Kapoor to step down after an extended term till January 31, 2019.
On September 20, the London Stock Exchange crashed when top British investor Clarence Hatry and many of his associates were jailed for fraud and forgery.[8] The London crash greatly weakened the optimism of American investment in markets overseas.[8] In the days leading up to the crash, the market was severely unstable. Periods of selling and high volumes were interspersed with brief periods of rising prices and recovery.

In Southern California, the pacific rim money has driven the market to a dark place. Dark in the sense that to afford an “average” home you need a household income of $170k annually and that has increased the number of people living in newly purchased homes. Chinese millionaires are dominating the market and the middle class citizens are living paycheck to paycheck or leaving California for better quality of life.
Obviously, some prediction of the market's downfall is going to turn out to be right. The market will go into a major slump again at some point. After all, since 1929 we've suffered through 20 bear markets where stock prices have fallen 20% or more, and even before the current turbulence, we've endured 26 corrections of at least 10% but less than 20%. But it's impossible to know in advance whether heightened volatility or even a decline that appears to gathering momentum will turn out to be The Next Big One.
In addition, the rapid growth of the video game industry led to an increased demand for video games, but which the manufacturers over-projected. An analyst for Goldman Sachs had stated in 1983 that the demand for video games was up 100% from 1982, but the manufacturing output increased by 175%, creating a surplus in the market.[4] Raymond Kassar, the CEO of Atari, had recognized in 1982 that there would become a point of saturation for the industry, but did not expect this to occur until about half of American households had a video game console; at the time, only about 15 million machines had been sold, far below this expected point.[4]

Editor’s Note: The following article has been contributed by Daisy Luther at The Organic Prepper web site. As always, Daisy has put together an excellent primer detailing the conditions we currently face, potential outcomes, and strategies you can implement to prepare for an inevitable crash in not just stocks markets, but the way of life we have come to know in America. 
After the experience of the 1929 crash, stock markets around the world instituted measures to suspend trading in the event of rapid declines, claiming that the measures would prevent such panic sales. However, the one-day crash of Black Monday, October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 22.6%, was worse in percentage terms than any single day of the 1929 crash (although the combined 25% decline of October 28–29, 1929 was larger than October 19, 1987, and remains the worst two-day decline ever).[citation needed]
Shares in public companies can be traded. The stock market is just like any market. Think of the ASX as Gumtree, but for pieces of ownership of massive companies. When shares change hands, the buyer and seller agree on a price, and we find out the share price. We get a new share price every time a new trade happens (which can be hundreds of times a minute). Over time that share price can go up or down.
The heads of the SEC and CFTC often point out that they are running an IT museum. They have photographic evidence to prove it—the highest-tech background that The New York Times (on September 21, 2010) could find for a photo of Gregg Berman, the SEC’s point man on the Flash, was a corner with five PCs, a Bloomberg, a printer, a fax, and three TVs on the wall with several large clocks.
"This is a kind of a panic sell-off occurs when the usually large amount of stop losses gets triggered as markets were not expecting such a drawdown in a single trading session," Mustafa Nadeem told FE Online. It was basically widespread to multiple companies, specifically, to NBFC space as there were concerns over credit risk coupled with that plunge in private banks, NBFC, and infrastructure housing finance companies, Nadeem said further. A lot of stop losses that were there in the market at much deeper levels of around 11,200 - 11,150, Mustafa Nadeem said. It was hardly 8-9 minutes of transactions that were much bigger that dragged the Benchmark index down. Though, on the flipside, There was buying seen at lower levels that pushed markets back above 11K level. Sensex was down almost a 1000 point within those few minutes, Mustafa Nadeem said. Technically this will change some technical setup in the medium term. If one would recall the same mode was seen in Early January this year. 

Until 1982, few third-party console games existed other than Activision's. Imagic and Games by Apollo demonstrated their own 2600 cartridges in January 1982, and Coleco announced several 2600 and Intellivision games. Parker Brothers, CBS Video Games, and Mattel also announced 2600 cartridges at the February Toy Fair, and Coleco announced the ColecoVision. At the Summer 1982 Consumer Electronics Show, 17 companies including MCA Inc. and Fox Video Games announced 90 new Atari games.[25] By 1983, an estimated 100 companies were vying to get a foothold in the video game market.[4]

Hey, thanks so much for the reply, Gord. I appreciate it. Yes, I’ve built one property and it’s a top vacation rental in its area. I’ll just have to be smart with the next one, and with looming fears of a recession (whether or not it happens) and stock market volitility, sellers appear to be spooked and dropped the price, so I’ll be able to buy the property for less. Timing might be good.
Terming the crash as a good opportunity to buy these stocks, Madhu Kela of Reliance Capital told ET Now,”Looks like a technical sell-off Their short-term liquidity is very very good; enough liquidity to match liability. Speculative unwinding Long term investor, if you understand the company and faith in management, excellent opportunity to buy these companies; if you think the management is good and will come out stronger, then it’s a good opportunity to buy the shares. Stock markets to worry about the liquidity of companies which have high credit ratings with good liquidity is purely speculative. Even if the interest rates are going up, the lending rates will also go up; to think that either the news is good, or the price is good.”

Adding to the problem is that much of the Chinese private debt is pledged with collateral from the stock market, which has been in free-fall this year. According to Reuters, more than 637 billion shares valued at $4.44 trillion yuan ($639.86 billion) were pledged for loans as of Oct. 12. As the air continues to pour out of the stock market, it will put additional pressure on the debt market.


HELL ONFRICKING EARTH AND THE END OF ALL LIFE ON EARTH AS WE KNOW IT IS NOW LITERALLY UP IN OUR FACES, JESUS HELP OUR SORRY ASSES THAT WE are in the 3-5,000,000 shtf survivors. Then comes Planet X, Nibiru showing up in April 2016, tips the poles on the plante 24′, erases the planets magnetic field, meltdown the ice caps and causes 1000 mph fu.///i…g winds trashing up the entire city centers of the all countries of the globe. Flooding, windstorm, hail, Hurricane, sunamis, etc, Crop destruction, anmimals running and migrating to the center of the Country to safe areas, futher depleting animal stocks in coastline cites, leaving the only avaible meat source to eat, fat, larger over women and men who did not prep, now the new food source to sustain the Dred Lock and lantino, ganstar drug dealing survivors.
October 2018 is turning out to be a lot like October 2008.  The S&P 500 has now fallen for 12 of the last 14 trading days, and it is on pace for its worst October since the last financial crisis.  But the U.S. is actually in much better shape than the rest of the world at this point.  Even though they have fallen precipitously in recent days, U.S. stocks are still up 3 percent for the year overall.  On the other hand, global stocks (excluding the U.S.) are now down more than 10 percent for the year, and they are down more than 15 percent from the peak of the market in January.  All it is going to take is a couple more really bad trading sessions to push global stocks into bear market territory.
However, there are a few qualifications to this: there is some risk that the migrant intake may be cut; while accelerating population growth in Queensland will support Brisbane property prices, population growth is slowing in NSW and Victoria so it’s becoming a bit less supportive of property prices in those states; and the supply of new dwellings has been catching up to strong population growth so undersupply is giving way to oversupply in some areas. The risk of the latter is highlighted by the continuing very high residential crane count which is still dominated by Sydney and Melbourne, indicating that there is still of lot of supply to hit the market ahead. Out of interest, Australia’s total residential crane count alone of 528 cranes is way above the total crane count (ie residential and non-residential) in the US of 300 and Canada of 123!
I’m less concerned than our friends at the Fed. Businesses are rebelling in mass against Trump’s punitive tariffs on steel, aluminum, and lumber. Trump is still blind to his own economic idiocy as I write. Given the torrent of negative press on tariffs in recent weeks, I suspect that a member or two of his retinue will force him to see the light. They’ll force him sooner than later.
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